Product In Review: Oscar Wylee ‘Jarvis’ eyeglasses

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Buying eyeglasses is one of the more polarising purchases in the digital age. The days of a single evil corporation dominating the eyewear market are waning, losing ground to independent companies that exploit the power of the internet in order to obtain a competitive financial edge.

While American label Warby Parker immediately springs to mind, other non-vertical eyewear businesses have since emerged around the world. In our neck of the woods, that title falls to Oscar Wylee. An obscurely titled start-up out of Sydney, giving Aussies a taste of acceptably made optics at a reasonable price. 

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GQ Japan’s 8 modernist looks for Fall 2014 

Styled by Naoki Ikeda 

The outfits 3rd (minus the pocket square detail on the outerwear) and 6th from the left are my favourites. To be honest, anything involving Mackintosh outerwear quickly harnesses my attention. 

Japanese casualwear brand JOURNAL STANDARD makes frequent appearances in this feature, with due exposure given over to their Aqualinc and Trisect sub-labels. Notoriously difficult to find overseas.

For those big into the directional styling of sportswear brands like Club Monaco and Gant Rugger, this stuff is going to be pure crack cocaine. Click through the link for a detailed breakdown of the featured brands and individual outfits. Hopefully, your Kanji game is stronger than mine. 

(Source: GQ Japan

STYLE | ETERNITY 

Son Of Warby - if you’re posted up down under and have a hankering for affordable optics, peep the review blogside (later this week) for some options.. #vscocam #oscarwylee #jarvis (at House of Pain )

Moriyama/Shinjuku/Street level #daidomoriyama #vscocam (at Gallery of Modern Art)

Outfit grid at @pjohnsontailors - featuring chalkstripe separates, cream trou, and snuff suede. Compromise on formality, not elegance. #tbt #vscocam #walkerlane

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And now for something completely different.

A few years ago - when I was a wee young nipper (read a filthy fresher) - I started a semi regular radio show with a dear friend of mine at university.

Long before I succumbed to the joys of a well knotted four in hand or comprehended the difference between ‘Max’ and ‘Force’ I reviewed films and television. As you can imagine, high school fucking sucked for this guy. 

While this blog certainly has come to consume the most of my time, the-doubletake (a successor to what was originally known on campus as ‘Camera & Controller’) holds a certain place in my heart. The aforementioned mate, Conor, continues to run the site and aggregate all things pop culture and film related. Including - yes, you guessed it - recordings of my pretentious voice talking smack about media I have absolutely zero qualification to critique.

If that’s not to your liking the guys put in a lot of work and have dozens of other funny reviews and articles on what’s happening in the world of film and television. 

On a more serious note, cinema has greatly influenced my aesthetic proclivities and it is for this reason I wanted to take the time to share this with anyone who happens upon styleternity. I’ve talked at length about clothes on film, so it’s only natural that I’d expand that some day and share with you all the horrible misfortune of listening to my not quite Aussie voice.

Now, back to overpriced noragis and loafers.

You can find more reviews by Conor & The Double Take gang on Soundcloud

STYLE | ETERNITY

Pensive Sadboy stance 👦 ft. terrible hand placement #10percentpeople #byungjunkim (at Burnett Lane)

The mark of luxury 
I suppose my obsession with tailored clothing boils down to simplicity. Truly - when a few basic principles are diligently applied - it is a simple matter for a man wearing traditional suiting to emerge smelling only of roses.
The gradual evolution (as opposed to revolution) of tailored clothing can be glimpsed in small details. There are no grand flourishes to evoke a sense of clever design, but small tweaks to fabrication. Maybe an elevated skirt here, a higher gorge there, a spongier fabric elsewhere. Change in good tailored clothing is incremental, and thus much more weighty. 
thearmoury team have long exercised an eye for such careful progression. Mark and his band select products of indisputable longevity, but poke a little deeper and you’ll find artifacts that competently straddle the happy divide between trad and modernity. 
The OTR Ring Jacket ‘184’ is the perfect staple suit. Nowadays, menswear buyers are obsessed by seasonal offerings. However I’ve long been excited by the prospect of a truly essential piece of clothing, good for all seasons. Available in gray and mid-navy, the 184 suit boasts a number of signature details synonymous with Ring style. 
With a clean chest, generous sleevehead, and reduced body, this is suiting that will flatter all but the tallest man. Made in a versatile 4 season wool (by Loro Piana) the 184 confirms Ring Jacket’s commitment to sourcing excellent fabrics. To be sure, an all year wool sounds neither as cool (no pun intended) as ‘ice twist’ nor as innovative as ‘creamy waffle’ but it is a sensible choice vital for young men who wish to feel good without a fuss.
Absolutely beautiful.
(Source: The Armoury Store)
STYLE | ETERNITY 
The mark of luxury 
I suppose my obsession with tailored clothing boils down to simplicity. Truly - when a few basic principles are diligently applied - it is a simple matter for a man wearing traditional suiting to emerge smelling only of roses.
The gradual evolution (as opposed to revolution) of tailored clothing can be glimpsed in small details. There are no grand flourishes to evoke a sense of clever design, but small tweaks to fabrication. Maybe an elevated skirt here, a higher gorge there, a spongier fabric elsewhere. Change in good tailored clothing is incremental, and thus much more weighty. 
thearmoury team have long exercised an eye for such careful progression. Mark and his band select products of indisputable longevity, but poke a little deeper and you’ll find artifacts that competently straddle the happy divide between trad and modernity. 
The OTR Ring Jacket ‘184’ is the perfect staple suit. Nowadays, menswear buyers are obsessed by seasonal offerings. However I’ve long been excited by the prospect of a truly essential piece of clothing, good for all seasons. Available in gray and mid-navy, the 184 suit boasts a number of signature details synonymous with Ring style. 
With a clean chest, generous sleevehead, and reduced body, this is suiting that will flatter all but the tallest man. Made in a versatile 4 season wool (by Loro Piana) the 184 confirms Ring Jacket’s commitment to sourcing excellent fabrics. To be sure, an all year wool sounds neither as cool (no pun intended) as ‘ice twist’ nor as innovative as ‘creamy waffle’ but it is a sensible choice vital for young men who wish to feel good without a fuss.
Absolutely beautiful.
(Source: The Armoury Store)
STYLE | ETERNITY 

The mark of luxury 

I suppose my obsession with tailored clothing boils down to simplicity. Truly - when a few basic principles are diligently applied - it is a simple matter for a man wearing traditional suiting to emerge smelling only of roses.

The gradual evolution (as opposed to revolution) of tailored clothing can be glimpsed in small details. There are no grand flourishes to evoke a sense of clever design, but small tweaks to fabrication. Maybe an elevated skirt here, a higher gorge there, a spongier fabric elsewhere. Change in good tailored clothing is incremental, and thus much more weighty. 

thearmoury team have long exercised an eye for such careful progression. Mark and his band select products of indisputable longevity, but poke a little deeper and you’ll find artifacts that competently straddle the happy divide between trad and modernity. 

The OTR Ring Jacket ‘184’ is the perfect staple suit. Nowadays, menswear buyers are obsessed by seasonal offerings. However I’ve long been excited by the prospect of a truly essential piece of clothing, good for all seasons. Available in gray and mid-navy, the 184 suit boasts a number of signature details synonymous with Ring style. 

With a clean chest, generous sleevehead, and reduced body, this is suiting that will flatter all but the tallest man. Made in a versatile 4 season wool (by Loro Piana) the 184 confirms Ring Jacket’s commitment to sourcing excellent fabrics. To be sure, an all year wool sounds neither as cool (no pun intended) as ‘ice twist’ nor as innovative as ‘creamy waffle’ but it is a sensible choice vital for young men who wish to feel good without a fuss.

Absolutely beautiful.

(Source: The Armoury Store)

STYLE | ETERNITY 

tornandfrayed:

Miles Davis by Piter Doele.

RAPID REBLOGS- (‘A series where we talk some more about what we decide to reblog’)
"For me, music and life are all about style"- Miles Davis 
STYLE | ETERNITY

tornandfrayed:

Miles Davis by Piter Doele.

RAPID REBLOGS
- (‘A series where we talk some more about what we decide to reblog’)

"For me, music and life are all about style"
- Miles Davis 

STYLE | ETERNITY

Four Horsemen & the essential non-essential noragi 
Like most menswear nerds, I am in a constant and turbulent battle to control my reckless spending habits. More often than not cooler heads prevail and knee-jerk expenditures can - with enough Scottish courage and staring into mirrors - be controlled.
However, a couple days ago, whilst browsing the ol’ Four Pins Alma Mater I (like the collective menswear universe) took complete leave of my senses and fell madly in lust with the newest noragi to be dropped by Canadian heavyweight 4 Horsemen.
Allow us to be frank for a moment. This is hardly an essential piece of clothing. But, viewed as a statement piece, it suddenly becomes an irrefutable object of desire. It is essentially non-essential, if you will.
Made in incredibly small runs by a single local manufacturer (a tailor, to be exact) the 2-ply crinkle cut noragi is the ultimate layering device, particularly in temperate climates.
Unlike more conventional warm layers it is much less bulky and is hemmed at the top of the natural seat. And, unlike sweaters of every ilk, piling is a mere distant memory with this thing. 
It is very light on detail, save for two slash pockets, and a heavy duty internal pocket cut with white leaf motif. Perfect for channeling your best Yojimbo vibes without taking the whole enterprise to hitherto unheard of levels of cultural appropriation. 
The bad news? The motherfuckers are 100% permanently sold out. At this point - yes, I know, its a very weak move - I’d be comfortable signing up to 4 Horsemen’s mailing list just to be notified of the next opportunity I have to recklessly spend over $200. 
The heart wants what the heart wants, right?
STYLE | ETERNITY
Four Horsemen & the essential non-essential noragi 
Like most menswear nerds, I am in a constant and turbulent battle to control my reckless spending habits. More often than not cooler heads prevail and knee-jerk expenditures can - with enough Scottish courage and staring into mirrors - be controlled.
However, a couple days ago, whilst browsing the ol’ Four Pins Alma Mater I (like the collective menswear universe) took complete leave of my senses and fell madly in lust with the newest noragi to be dropped by Canadian heavyweight 4 Horsemen.
Allow us to be frank for a moment. This is hardly an essential piece of clothing. But, viewed as a statement piece, it suddenly becomes an irrefutable object of desire. It is essentially non-essential, if you will.
Made in incredibly small runs by a single local manufacturer (a tailor, to be exact) the 2-ply crinkle cut noragi is the ultimate layering device, particularly in temperate climates.
Unlike more conventional warm layers it is much less bulky and is hemmed at the top of the natural seat. And, unlike sweaters of every ilk, piling is a mere distant memory with this thing. 
It is very light on detail, save for two slash pockets, and a heavy duty internal pocket cut with white leaf motif. Perfect for channeling your best Yojimbo vibes without taking the whole enterprise to hitherto unheard of levels of cultural appropriation. 
The bad news? The motherfuckers are 100% permanently sold out. At this point - yes, I know, its a very weak move - I’d be comfortable signing up to 4 Horsemen’s mailing list just to be notified of the next opportunity I have to recklessly spend over $200. 
The heart wants what the heart wants, right?
STYLE | ETERNITY

Four Horsemen & the essential non-essential noragi 

Like most menswear nerds, I am in a constant and turbulent battle to control my reckless spending habits. More often than not cooler heads prevail and knee-jerk expenditures can - with enough Scottish courage and staring into mirrors - be controlled.

However, a couple days ago, whilst browsing the ol’ Four Pins Alma Mater I (like the collective menswear universe) took complete leave of my senses and fell madly in lust with the newest noragi to be dropped by Canadian heavyweight 4 Horsemen.

Allow us to be frank for a moment. This is hardly an essential piece of clothing. But, viewed as a statement piece, it suddenly becomes an irrefutable object of desire. It is essentially non-essential, if you will.

Made in incredibly small runs by a single local manufacturer (a tailor, to be exact) the 2-ply crinkle cut noragi is the ultimate layering device, particularly in temperate climates.

Unlike more conventional warm layers it is much less bulky and is hemmed at the top of the natural seat. And, unlike sweaters of every ilk, piling is a mere distant memory with this thing. 

It is very light on detail, save for two slash pockets, and a heavy duty internal pocket cut with white leaf motif. Perfect for channeling your best Yojimbo vibes without taking the whole enterprise to hitherto unheard of levels of cultural appropriation. 

The bad news? The motherfuckers are 100% permanently sold out. At this point - yes, I know, its a very weak move - I’d be comfortable signing up to 4 Horsemen’s mailing list just to be notified of the next opportunity I have to recklessly spend over $200. 

The heart wants what the heart wants, right?

STYLE | ETERNITY

Third time is the charm (sort of)
Way back when, in 2009, Uniqlo partnered with Jil Sander for a designer collaboration that resurrected the latter’s career. The fast fashion capsule itself was received with widespread acclaim. It brought affordable, minimalist, disproportionately well made couture to the mainstream and in doing so solidified Uniqlo’s place at the top of the fast fashion pantheon. 
While the last collaboration between the two brands was in 2011, consumers will get a quasi third coming this year with the +J ‘best of’ collection. Likely, an amalgamation of all the most popular offerings from the collaboration rolled into a single release.
I myself never had the opportunity to cop any of the initial +J releases. Uniqlo was not known to me back in 2009, and the geographical distribution of the brand’s international stores means that Australians have (for the longest time) missed out on even mainline offerings from the Japanese retailer.
So, while others are inclined to disagree I’m very excited about the chance to get my hands on some of the more directional classics that Uniqlo’s best designer collaboration has previously produced. Sure, the $200 wool/cashmere sportcoat is unlikely to survive the scrutiny of most #menswear nerds but from all the coverage the collab’s pieces have received there seem to be a few interesting outerwear options well worth the entry level price.
(Source: The GQ Eye) 
STYLE | ETERNITY 
Third time is the charm (sort of)
Way back when, in 2009, Uniqlo partnered with Jil Sander for a designer collaboration that resurrected the latter’s career. The fast fashion capsule itself was received with widespread acclaim. It brought affordable, minimalist, disproportionately well made couture to the mainstream and in doing so solidified Uniqlo’s place at the top of the fast fashion pantheon. 
While the last collaboration between the two brands was in 2011, consumers will get a quasi third coming this year with the +J ‘best of’ collection. Likely, an amalgamation of all the most popular offerings from the collaboration rolled into a single release.
I myself never had the opportunity to cop any of the initial +J releases. Uniqlo was not known to me back in 2009, and the geographical distribution of the brand’s international stores means that Australians have (for the longest time) missed out on even mainline offerings from the Japanese retailer.
So, while others are inclined to disagree I’m very excited about the chance to get my hands on some of the more directional classics that Uniqlo’s best designer collaboration has previously produced. Sure, the $200 wool/cashmere sportcoat is unlikely to survive the scrutiny of most #menswear nerds but from all the coverage the collab’s pieces have received there seem to be a few interesting outerwear options well worth the entry level price.
(Source: The GQ Eye) 
STYLE | ETERNITY 

Third time is the charm (sort of)

Way back when, in 2009, Uniqlo partnered with Jil Sander for a designer collaboration that resurrected the latter’s career. The fast fashion capsule itself was received with widespread acclaim. It brought affordable, minimalist, disproportionately well made couture to the mainstream and in doing so solidified Uniqlo’s place at the top of the fast fashion pantheon. 

While the last collaboration between the two brands was in 2011, consumers will get a quasi third coming this year with the +J ‘best of’ collection. Likely, an amalgamation of all the most popular offerings from the collaboration rolled into a single release.

I myself never had the opportunity to cop any of the initial +J releases. Uniqlo was not known to me back in 2009, and the geographical distribution of the brand’s international stores means that Australians have (for the longest time) missed out on even mainline offerings from the Japanese retailer.

So, while others are inclined to disagree I’m very excited about the chance to get my hands on some of the more directional classics that Uniqlo’s best designer collaboration has previously produced. Sure, the $200 wool/cashmere sportcoat is unlikely to survive the scrutiny of most #menswear nerds but from all the coverage the collab’s pieces have received there seem to be a few interesting outerwear options well worth the entry level price.

(Source: The GQ Eye

STYLE | ETERNITY 

Nikon D700

Cosy

(Source: MAAS & Stacks

STYLE | ETERNITY 

Tagliatore coming in hot with the credible endorsement from Beams 

A chesterfield paired with rollneck (far left) is a combination that’s always going to be a-okay in my book 

(Source: Men’s Ex)

STYLE | ETERNITY

Philippe Le Sourd’s cinematography 
Traditional Asian portraiture 
Special mention goes to Yi “The Razor” Xian Tian (3rd from top) for doing his best Take Ivy impression 
The changshan (长衫) that Master Ip favours throughout most of the film is typical of the unique Shanghainese style that immigrants brought to Hong Kong in the 1950’s. It’s also a killer piece of clothing with great practicality
(Source: FilmGrab)STYLE | ETERNITY
Philippe Le Sourd’s cinematography 
Traditional Asian portraiture 
Special mention goes to Yi “The Razor” Xian Tian (3rd from top) for doing his best Take Ivy impression 
The changshan (长衫) that Master Ip favours throughout most of the film is typical of the unique Shanghainese style that immigrants brought to Hong Kong in the 1950’s. It’s also a killer piece of clothing with great practicality
(Source: FilmGrab)STYLE | ETERNITY
Philippe Le Sourd’s cinematography 
Traditional Asian portraiture 
Special mention goes to Yi “The Razor” Xian Tian (3rd from top) for doing his best Take Ivy impression 
The changshan (长衫) that Master Ip favours throughout most of the film is typical of the unique Shanghainese style that immigrants brought to Hong Kong in the 1950’s. It’s also a killer piece of clothing with great practicality
(Source: FilmGrab)STYLE | ETERNITY

Philippe Le Sourd’s cinematography 

Traditional Asian portraiture 

Special mention goes to Yi “The Razor” Xian Tian (3rd from top) for doing his best Take Ivy impression 

The changshan () that Master Ip favours throughout most of the film is typical of the unique Shanghainese style that immigrants brought to Hong Kong in the 1950’s. It’s also a killer piece of clothing with great practicality

(Source: FilmGrab)

STYLE | ETERNITY

Church is in session ⛪️ #vscocam #yeezus