The mark of luxury 
I suppose my obsession with tailored clothing boils down to simplicity. Truly - when a few basic principles are diligently applied - it is a simple matter for a man wearing traditional suiting to emerge smelling of anything other than roses.
The gradual evolution (as opposed to revolution) of tailored clothing can be glimpsed in small details. There are no grand flourishes to evoke a sense of clever design, but small tweaks to fabrication. Maybe an elevated skirt here, a higher rise there, a spongier fabric elsewhere. Change in good tailored clothing is incremental, and thus much more weighty. 
thearmoury team have long exercised an eye for such careful progression. Mark and his band select products of indisputable longevity, but poke a little deeper and you’ll find artifacts that competently straddle the happy divide between trad and modernity. 
The OTR Ring Jacket ‘184’ is the perfect staple suit. Nowadays, menswear buyers are obsessed with by seasonal offerings. However I’ve long been excited by the prospect of a truly essential piece of clothing, good for all seasons. Available in gray and mid-navy, the 184 suit boasts a number of signature details synonymous with Ring style. 
With a clean chest, generous sleevehead, and reduced body, this is suiting that will flatter all but the tallest man. Made in a versatile 4 season wool (by Loro Piana) the 184 confirms Ring Jacket’s commitment to sourcing excellent fabrics. To be sure, an all year wool sounds neither as cool (no pun intended) as ‘ice twist’ nor as innovative as ‘creamy waffle’ but it is a sensible choice vital for young men who wish to feel good without a fuss.
Absolutely beautiful.
(Source: The Armoury Store)
STYLE | ETERNITY 
The mark of luxury 
I suppose my obsession with tailored clothing boils down to simplicity. Truly - when a few basic principles are diligently applied - it is a simple matter for a man wearing traditional suiting to emerge smelling of anything other than roses.
The gradual evolution (as opposed to revolution) of tailored clothing can be glimpsed in small details. There are no grand flourishes to evoke a sense of clever design, but small tweaks to fabrication. Maybe an elevated skirt here, a higher rise there, a spongier fabric elsewhere. Change in good tailored clothing is incremental, and thus much more weighty. 
thearmoury team have long exercised an eye for such careful progression. Mark and his band select products of indisputable longevity, but poke a little deeper and you’ll find artifacts that competently straddle the happy divide between trad and modernity. 
The OTR Ring Jacket ‘184’ is the perfect staple suit. Nowadays, menswear buyers are obsessed with by seasonal offerings. However I’ve long been excited by the prospect of a truly essential piece of clothing, good for all seasons. Available in gray and mid-navy, the 184 suit boasts a number of signature details synonymous with Ring style. 
With a clean chest, generous sleevehead, and reduced body, this is suiting that will flatter all but the tallest man. Made in a versatile 4 season wool (by Loro Piana) the 184 confirms Ring Jacket’s commitment to sourcing excellent fabrics. To be sure, an all year wool sounds neither as cool (no pun intended) as ‘ice twist’ nor as innovative as ‘creamy waffle’ but it is a sensible choice vital for young men who wish to feel good without a fuss.
Absolutely beautiful.
(Source: The Armoury Store)
STYLE | ETERNITY 

The mark of luxury 

I suppose my obsession with tailored clothing boils down to simplicity. Truly - when a few basic principles are diligently applied - it is a simple matter for a man wearing traditional suiting to emerge smelling of anything other than roses.

The gradual evolution (as opposed to revolution) of tailored clothing can be glimpsed in small details. There are no grand flourishes to evoke a sense of clever design, but small tweaks to fabrication. Maybe an elevated skirt here, a higher rise there, a spongier fabric elsewhere. Change in good tailored clothing is incremental, and thus much more weighty. 

thearmoury team have long exercised an eye for such careful progression. Mark and his band select products of indisputable longevity, but poke a little deeper and you’ll find artifacts that competently straddle the happy divide between trad and modernity. 

The OTR Ring Jacket ‘184’ is the perfect staple suit. Nowadays, menswear buyers are obsessed with by seasonal offerings. However I’ve long been excited by the prospect of a truly essential piece of clothing, good for all seasons. Available in gray and mid-navy, the 184 suit boasts a number of signature details synonymous with Ring style. 

With a clean chest, generous sleevehead, and reduced body, this is suiting that will flatter all but the tallest man. Made in a versatile 4 season wool (by Loro Piana) the 184 confirms Ring Jacket’s commitment to sourcing excellent fabrics. To be sure, an all year wool sounds neither as cool (no pun intended) as ‘ice twist’ nor as innovative as ‘creamy waffle’ but it is a sensible choice vital for young men who wish to feel good without a fuss.

Absolutely beautiful.

(Source: The Armoury Store)

STYLE | ETERNITY 

tornandfrayed:

Miles Davis by Piter Doele.

RAPID REBLOGS- (‘A series where we talk some more about what we decide to reblog’)
"For me, music and life are all about style"- Miles Davis 
STYLE | ETERNITY

tornandfrayed:

Miles Davis by Piter Doele.

RAPID REBLOGS
- (‘A series where we talk some more about what we decide to reblog’)

"For me, music and life are all about style"
- Miles Davis 

STYLE | ETERNITY

Four Horsemen & the essential non-essential noragi 
Like most menswear nerds, I am in a constant and turbulent battle to control my reckless spending habits. More often than not cooler heads prevail and knee-jerk expenditures can - with enough Scottish courage and staring into mirrors - be controlled.
However, a couple days ago, whilst browsing the ol’ Four Pins Alma Mater I (like the collective menswear universe) took complete leave of my senses and fell madly in lust with the newest noragi to be dropped by Canadian heavyweight 4 Horsemen.
Allow us to be frank for a moment. This is hardly an essential piece of clothing. But, viewed as a statement piece, it suddenly becomes an irrefutable object of desire. It is essentially non-essential, if you will.
Made in incredibly small runs by a single local manufacturer (a tailor, to be exact) the 2-ply crinkle cut noragi is the ultimate layering device, particularly in temperate climates.
Unlike more conventional warm layers it is much less bulky and is hemmed at the top of the natural seat. And, unlike sweaters of every ilk, piling is a mere distant memory with this thing. 
It is very light on detail, save for two slash pockets, and a heavy duty internal pocket cut with white leaf motif. Perfect for channeling your best Yojimbo vibes without taking the whole enterprise to hitherto unheard of levels of cultural appropriation. 
The bad news? The motherfuckers are 100% permanently sold out. At this point - yes, I know, its a very weak move - I’d be comfortable signing up to 4 Horsemen’s mailing list just to be notified of the next opportunity I have to recklessly spend over $200. 
The heart wants what the heart wants, right?
STYLE | ETERNITY
Four Horsemen & the essential non-essential noragi 
Like most menswear nerds, I am in a constant and turbulent battle to control my reckless spending habits. More often than not cooler heads prevail and knee-jerk expenditures can - with enough Scottish courage and staring into mirrors - be controlled.
However, a couple days ago, whilst browsing the ol’ Four Pins Alma Mater I (like the collective menswear universe) took complete leave of my senses and fell madly in lust with the newest noragi to be dropped by Canadian heavyweight 4 Horsemen.
Allow us to be frank for a moment. This is hardly an essential piece of clothing. But, viewed as a statement piece, it suddenly becomes an irrefutable object of desire. It is essentially non-essential, if you will.
Made in incredibly small runs by a single local manufacturer (a tailor, to be exact) the 2-ply crinkle cut noragi is the ultimate layering device, particularly in temperate climates.
Unlike more conventional warm layers it is much less bulky and is hemmed at the top of the natural seat. And, unlike sweaters of every ilk, piling is a mere distant memory with this thing. 
It is very light on detail, save for two slash pockets, and a heavy duty internal pocket cut with white leaf motif. Perfect for channeling your best Yojimbo vibes without taking the whole enterprise to hitherto unheard of levels of cultural appropriation. 
The bad news? The motherfuckers are 100% permanently sold out. At this point - yes, I know, its a very weak move - I’d be comfortable signing up to 4 Horsemen’s mailing list just to be notified of the next opportunity I have to recklessly spend over $200. 
The heart wants what the heart wants, right?
STYLE | ETERNITY

Four Horsemen & the essential non-essential noragi 

Like most menswear nerds, I am in a constant and turbulent battle to control my reckless spending habits. More often than not cooler heads prevail and knee-jerk expenditures can - with enough Scottish courage and staring into mirrors - be controlled.

However, a couple days ago, whilst browsing the ol’ Four Pins Alma Mater I (like the collective menswear universe) took complete leave of my senses and fell madly in lust with the newest noragi to be dropped by Canadian heavyweight 4 Horsemen.

Allow us to be frank for a moment. This is hardly an essential piece of clothing. But, viewed as a statement piece, it suddenly becomes an irrefutable object of desire. It is essentially non-essential, if you will.

Made in incredibly small runs by a single local manufacturer (a tailor, to be exact) the 2-ply crinkle cut noragi is the ultimate layering device, particularly in temperate climates.

Unlike more conventional warm layers it is much less bulky and is hemmed at the top of the natural seat. And, unlike sweaters of every ilk, piling is a mere distant memory with this thing. 

It is very light on detail, save for two slash pockets, and a heavy duty internal pocket cut with white leaf motif. Perfect for channeling your best Yojimbo vibes without taking the whole enterprise to hitherto unheard of levels of cultural appropriation. 

The bad news? The motherfuckers are 100% permanently sold out. At this point - yes, I know, its a very weak move - I’d be comfortable signing up to 4 Horsemen’s mailing list just to be notified of the next opportunity I have to recklessly spend over $200. 

The heart wants what the heart wants, right?

STYLE | ETERNITY

Third time is the charm (sort of)
Way back when, in 2009, Uniqlo partnered with Jil Sander for a designer collaboration that resurrected the latter’s career. The fast fashion capsule itself was received with widespread acclaim. It brought affordable, minimalist, disproportionately well made couture to the mainstream and in doing so solidified Uniqlo’s place at the top of the fast fashion pantheon. 
While the last collaboration between the two brands was in 2011, consumers will get a quasi third coming this year with the +J ‘best of’ collection. Likely, an amalgamation of all the most popular offerings from the collaboration rolled into a single release.
I myself never had the opportunity to cop any of the initial +J releases. Uniqlo was not known to me back in 2009, and the geographical distribution of the brand’s international stores means that Australians have (for the longest time) missed out on even mainline offerings from the Japanese retailer.
So, while others are inclined to disagree I’m very excited about the chance to get my hands on some of the more directional classics that Uniqlo’s best designer collaboration has previously produced. Sure, the $200 wool/cashmere sportcoat is unlikely to survive the scrutiny of most #menswear nerds but from all the coverage the collab’s pieces have received there seem to be a few interesting outerwear options well worth the entry level price.
(Source: The GQ Eye) 
STYLE | ETERNITY 
Third time is the charm (sort of)
Way back when, in 2009, Uniqlo partnered with Jil Sander for a designer collaboration that resurrected the latter’s career. The fast fashion capsule itself was received with widespread acclaim. It brought affordable, minimalist, disproportionately well made couture to the mainstream and in doing so solidified Uniqlo’s place at the top of the fast fashion pantheon. 
While the last collaboration between the two brands was in 2011, consumers will get a quasi third coming this year with the +J ‘best of’ collection. Likely, an amalgamation of all the most popular offerings from the collaboration rolled into a single release.
I myself never had the opportunity to cop any of the initial +J releases. Uniqlo was not known to me back in 2009, and the geographical distribution of the brand’s international stores means that Australians have (for the longest time) missed out on even mainline offerings from the Japanese retailer.
So, while others are inclined to disagree I’m very excited about the chance to get my hands on some of the more directional classics that Uniqlo’s best designer collaboration has previously produced. Sure, the $200 wool/cashmere sportcoat is unlikely to survive the scrutiny of most #menswear nerds but from all the coverage the collab’s pieces have received there seem to be a few interesting outerwear options well worth the entry level price.
(Source: The GQ Eye) 
STYLE | ETERNITY 

Third time is the charm (sort of)

Way back when, in 2009, Uniqlo partnered with Jil Sander for a designer collaboration that resurrected the latter’s career. The fast fashion capsule itself was received with widespread acclaim. It brought affordable, minimalist, disproportionately well made couture to the mainstream and in doing so solidified Uniqlo’s place at the top of the fast fashion pantheon. 

While the last collaboration between the two brands was in 2011, consumers will get a quasi third coming this year with the +J ‘best of’ collection. Likely, an amalgamation of all the most popular offerings from the collaboration rolled into a single release.

I myself never had the opportunity to cop any of the initial +J releases. Uniqlo was not known to me back in 2009, and the geographical distribution of the brand’s international stores means that Australians have (for the longest time) missed out on even mainline offerings from the Japanese retailer.

So, while others are inclined to disagree I’m very excited about the chance to get my hands on some of the more directional classics that Uniqlo’s best designer collaboration has previously produced. Sure, the $200 wool/cashmere sportcoat is unlikely to survive the scrutiny of most #menswear nerds but from all the coverage the collab’s pieces have received there seem to be a few interesting outerwear options well worth the entry level price.

(Source: The GQ Eye

STYLE | ETERNITY 

Nikon D700

Cosy

(Source: MAAS & Stacks

STYLE | ETERNITY 

Tagliatore coming in hot with the credible endorsement from Beams 

A chesterfield paired with rollneck (far left) is a combination that’s always going to be a-okay in my book 

(Source: Men’s Ex)

STYLE | ETERNITY

Philippe Le Sourd’s cinematography 
Traditional Asian portraiture 
Special mention goes to Yi “The Razor” Xian Tian (3rd from top) for doing his best Take Ivy impression 
The changshan (长衫) that Master Ip favours throughout most of the film is typical of the unique Shanghainese style that immigrants brought to Hong Kong in the 1950’s. It’s also a killer piece of clothing with great practicality
(Source: FilmGrab)STYLE | ETERNITY
Philippe Le Sourd’s cinematography 
Traditional Asian portraiture 
Special mention goes to Yi “The Razor” Xian Tian (3rd from top) for doing his best Take Ivy impression 
The changshan (长衫) that Master Ip favours throughout most of the film is typical of the unique Shanghainese style that immigrants brought to Hong Kong in the 1950’s. It’s also a killer piece of clothing with great practicality
(Source: FilmGrab)STYLE | ETERNITY
Philippe Le Sourd’s cinematography 
Traditional Asian portraiture 
Special mention goes to Yi “The Razor” Xian Tian (3rd from top) for doing his best Take Ivy impression 
The changshan (长衫) that Master Ip favours throughout most of the film is typical of the unique Shanghainese style that immigrants brought to Hong Kong in the 1950’s. It’s also a killer piece of clothing with great practicality
(Source: FilmGrab)STYLE | ETERNITY

Philippe Le Sourd’s cinematography 

Traditional Asian portraiture 

Special mention goes to Yi “The Razor” Xian Tian (3rd from top) for doing his best Take Ivy impression 

The changshan () that Master Ip favours throughout most of the film is typical of the unique Shanghainese style that immigrants brought to Hong Kong in the 1950’s. It’s also a killer piece of clothing with great practicality

(Source: FilmGrab)

STYLE | ETERNITY

Church is in session ⛪️ #vscocam #yeezus

"Young enough to still sell dope, but old enough that I nose better" #vscocam #pushat #yeezus (at Brisbane Entertainment Centre)

Club Monaco now being offered via 3rd party 
The last couple of years have been fortuitous ones for Club Monaco. The North American sportswear haberdasher has substantially expanded its menswear offering since Aaron Levine came on board, culminating in their latest partnership with everybody’s favourite men’s e-shop Mr Porter. 
CM continues to excel in its chosen medium. Staples like the humble sweatshirt are elevated to dangerous levels of coppability and while the gear here is as good as ever - the initial online offering includes 15 pieces - the emphasis is on brand recognition. 
One of the world’s most successful - albeit highly unconventional - mall brands, its a sign of genuine credibility that CM are now being offered by a fanciful retailer like Mr Porter. CM have been difficult to acquire outside of North America, and to my knowledge this is the first time they have partnered with a 3rd party retailer. 
With a brand roster consisting typically of more high end luxury goods, my assumption is that the company’s buying team are stocking CM purely on its technical merits. While its affordability is relative, there is an immediate sense of longevity that comes with buying CM gear. It’s spendy yet sensible purchasing at its low-key best. 
I purchased a pair of simple sweatpants from them last fall and ever since then they’ve been heavy in daily rotation. Zero signs of degradation with a great value for money factor attached. 
It is incredibly exciting that men all over the world will now have readier access to a brand that has long been touted as an indispensable first stepping stone into menswear. 
(Source: Mr Porter)
STYLE | ETERNITY
Club Monaco now being offered via 3rd party 
The last couple of years have been fortuitous ones for Club Monaco. The North American sportswear haberdasher has substantially expanded its menswear offering since Aaron Levine came on board, culminating in their latest partnership with everybody’s favourite men’s e-shop Mr Porter. 
CM continues to excel in its chosen medium. Staples like the humble sweatshirt are elevated to dangerous levels of coppability and while the gear here is as good as ever - the initial online offering includes 15 pieces - the emphasis is on brand recognition. 
One of the world’s most successful - albeit highly unconventional - mall brands, its a sign of genuine credibility that CM are now being offered by a fanciful retailer like Mr Porter. CM have been difficult to acquire outside of North America, and to my knowledge this is the first time they have partnered with a 3rd party retailer. 
With a brand roster consisting typically of more high end luxury goods, my assumption is that the company’s buying team are stocking CM purely on its technical merits. While its affordability is relative, there is an immediate sense of longevity that comes with buying CM gear. It’s spendy yet sensible purchasing at its low-key best. 
I purchased a pair of simple sweatpants from them last fall and ever since then they’ve been heavy in daily rotation. Zero signs of degradation with a great value for money factor attached. 
It is incredibly exciting that men all over the world will now have readier access to a brand that has long been touted as an indispensable first stepping stone into menswear. 
(Source: Mr Porter)
STYLE | ETERNITY

Club Monaco now being offered via 3rd party 

The last couple of years have been fortuitous ones for Club Monaco. The North American sportswear haberdasher has substantially expanded its menswear offering since Aaron Levine came on board, culminating in their latest partnership with everybody’s favourite men’s e-shop Mr Porter. 

CM continues to excel in its chosen medium. Staples like the humble sweatshirt are elevated to dangerous levels of coppability and while the gear here is as good as ever - the initial online offering includes 15 pieces - the emphasis is on brand recognition. 

One of the world’s most successful - albeit highly unconventional - mall brands, its a sign of genuine credibility that CM are now being offered by a fanciful retailer like Mr Porter. CM have been difficult to acquire outside of North America, and to my knowledge this is the first time they have partnered with a 3rd party retailer. 

With a brand roster consisting typically of more high end luxury goods, my assumption is that the company’s buying team are stocking CM purely on its technical merits. While its affordability is relative, there is an immediate sense of longevity that comes with buying CM gear. It’s spendy yet sensible purchasing at its low-key best. 

I purchased a pair of simple sweatpants from them last fall and ever since then they’ve been heavy in daily rotation. Zero signs of degradation with a great value for money factor attached. 

It is incredibly exciting that men all over the world will now have readier access to a brand that has long been touted as an indispensable first stepping stone into menswear. 

(Source: Mr Porter)

STYLE | ETERNITY

xrxxxx:

Self portrait.

on me

Lock & co. straw hat

Ring Jacket navy mohair stripe double breasted suit

Sorley R navy knit tie and Ascot shirt.

RAPID REBLOGS
- (‘A series where we talk some more about what we decide to reblog’)

Every member of thearmoury family has his own unique personal style. There is Jake’s popped polo, Mark & Alan’s patinova lapel chains, and now xrxxxx seems to have cemented his place within the canon of well dressed gentlemen with a well deployed Lock & Co straw hat. 

This image gives me heavy ‘In The Mood For Love’ feels. That’s never a bad thing. 

STYLE | ETERNITY 

On guncheck cloths & sentimentality
Yesterday, as a consequence of procrastination, I found myself staring dumbly for maybe a good twenty minutes at Aaron’s beautiful guncheck sportcoat. 
Made in a visually arresting Aberchalder style cloth, Aaron’s jacket recalls the sort of rigs worn by my father during the latter days of my childhood. Black and white checks, overlaid with red windowpane, were a keystone image during those years of infancy. They spoke to me at once of elegance, nonchalance, and perhaps just a hint of my father’s Anglo-Scottish education.
Honestly, I am excessively sentimental when it comes to such rustic cloths, because my height and girth forbid me the possibility of ever wearing much of my father’s tailored clothing. 
Such gunchecks have an intense but nonetheless harmonious visual complexity. In a way, dressing down such a jacket requires more than navy trousers and a simple twill/poplin shirt. This is undoubtedly where Aaron’s #menswear savvy proved effective. His sportcoat separate is fashioned with patch pockets - a detail my father would have eschewed in favour of more ‘sensible’ affectations from The Row - and in the first shot, he foregoes a tie altogether.
Multiple patterns are not so much the problem. The Duke of Windsor said it best when he alleged the skill is in gauging each pattern’s scale relative to another. Here, Aaron has worked an interesting circular motif in via his foulard, and its wide spacing harmonises exceptionally well with the guncheck jacket. 
(Source: Aaron Cheung) 
STYLE | ETERNITY 
On guncheck cloths & sentimentality
Yesterday, as a consequence of procrastination, I found myself staring dumbly for maybe a good twenty minutes at Aaron’s beautiful guncheck sportcoat. 
Made in a visually arresting Aberchalder style cloth, Aaron’s jacket recalls the sort of rigs worn by my father during the latter days of my childhood. Black and white checks, overlaid with red windowpane, were a keystone image during those years of infancy. They spoke to me at once of elegance, nonchalance, and perhaps just a hint of my father’s Anglo-Scottish education.
Honestly, I am excessively sentimental when it comes to such rustic cloths, because my height and girth forbid me the possibility of ever wearing much of my father’s tailored clothing. 
Such gunchecks have an intense but nonetheless harmonious visual complexity. In a way, dressing down such a jacket requires more than navy trousers and a simple twill/poplin shirt. This is undoubtedly where Aaron’s #menswear savvy proved effective. His sportcoat separate is fashioned with patch pockets - a detail my father would have eschewed in favour of more ‘sensible’ affectations from The Row - and in the first shot, he foregoes a tie altogether.
Multiple patterns are not so much the problem. The Duke of Windsor said it best when he alleged the skill is in gauging each pattern’s scale relative to another. Here, Aaron has worked an interesting circular motif in via his foulard, and its wide spacing harmonises exceptionally well with the guncheck jacket. 
(Source: Aaron Cheung) 
STYLE | ETERNITY 

On guncheck cloths & sentimentality

Yesterday, as a consequence of procrastination, I found myself staring dumbly for maybe a good twenty minutes at Aaron’s beautiful guncheck sportcoat. 

Made in a visually arresting Aberchalder style cloth, Aaron’s jacket recalls the sort of rigs worn by my father during the latter days of my childhood. Black and white checks, overlaid with red windowpane, were a keystone image during those years of infancy. They spoke to me at once of elegance, nonchalance, and perhaps just a hint of my father’s Anglo-Scottish education.

Honestly, I am excessively sentimental when it comes to such rustic cloths, because my height and girth forbid me the possibility of ever wearing much of my father’s tailored clothing. 

Such gunchecks have an intense but nonetheless harmonious visual complexity. In a way, dressing down such a jacket requires more than navy trousers and a simple twill/poplin shirt. This is undoubtedly where Aaron’s #menswear savvy proved effective. His sportcoat separate is fashioned with patch pockets - a detail my father would have eschewed in favour of more ‘sensible’ affectations from The Row - and in the first shot, he foregoes a tie altogether.

Multiple patterns are not so much the problem. The Duke of Windsor said it best when he alleged the skill is in gauging each pattern’s scale relative to another. Here, Aaron has worked an interesting circular motif in via his foulard, and its wide spacing harmonises exceptionally well with the guncheck jacket. 

(Source: Aaron Cheung

STYLE | ETERNITY 

Night at the Museum II: Loafer Boogalloo #vscocam #georgecleverley (at House of Pain )

Circle motifs by Drake’s in the most sublime shade of cream #tbt #vscocam #patrickjohnsontailors

OOTD 02-09-2014
As a law kid and fetishist for rule based deductions, I inevitably lump everything into categories.
So it goes, with outfits, I find my style diffusing at any given time into one of two categories. A more traditional tailored offering - ties, pochettes, hardbottoms. Then, increasingly, lightweight outerwear coupled with some form of technical sneakers. I’m hardly reinventing the wheel but the clear delineation between the two makes all the difference when getting dressed in a hurry. With winter well and truly over, afternoons in the sunshine state can get rather humid. Despite the relative humidity, rain can kick in at a moment’s notice. This coupled with strong winds means a secondary layer - while not crucial - is always ideal.
Lately I’ve been getting a lot of utility from my Folk raincoat. The UK based ready-to-wear brand has always had a robust selection of outerwear and this staple certainly doesn’t buck that trend. Made with wooden buttons and a storm shield, it maintains its elasticity at all times. This makes it perfect to scrunch up in a bag and drape over whatever outfit you’ve decided on for the day. And in the navy colourway: well, blocking is a non-issue.
I was also lucky enough to score a hooded sweatshirt from NY’s Aimé Leon Dore. While I regret my inability to purchase it earlier in the year, wherein its heft would have proved useful, there’s no denying it’s a well made piece. Insulated with denim fabric and made of a heavyweight terry cotton it forms a crucial foundation in casual outfits meant for tackling wind, rain, and sudden cold snaps. The side vents, though not asymmetric, are a nice detail that don’t scream out for attention. Best to let people notice these things gradually.
Overall I’ve been indulging my fledgling appetite for casual clothing more these days. With precious little time left at university I need to make up for lost opportunities by dressing as cosily as possible. It’s just a shame that, in this part of the world, the next few months (leading toward Christmas) are going to make playing the layer game so difficult. Nobody wants to be that guy with a bad case of swamp butt. 
Folk coated mac (raincoat/throwover/all-purpose straight up banger)
Aime Leon Dore hooded sweatshirt 
Maison Kitsune marled grey tee
Everest Isles ‘Mayol’ trunks (they make great shorts, cut with a high rise)
Nike Lunarglide All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 26-08-2014 
STYLE | ETERNITY
OOTD 02-09-2014
As a law kid and fetishist for rule based deductions, I inevitably lump everything into categories.
So it goes, with outfits, I find my style diffusing at any given time into one of two categories. A more traditional tailored offering - ties, pochettes, hardbottoms. Then, increasingly, lightweight outerwear coupled with some form of technical sneakers. I’m hardly reinventing the wheel but the clear delineation between the two makes all the difference when getting dressed in a hurry. With winter well and truly over, afternoons in the sunshine state can get rather humid. Despite the relative humidity, rain can kick in at a moment’s notice. This coupled with strong winds means a secondary layer - while not crucial - is always ideal.
Lately I’ve been getting a lot of utility from my Folk raincoat. The UK based ready-to-wear brand has always had a robust selection of outerwear and this staple certainly doesn’t buck that trend. Made with wooden buttons and a storm shield, it maintains its elasticity at all times. This makes it perfect to scrunch up in a bag and drape over whatever outfit you’ve decided on for the day. And in the navy colourway: well, blocking is a non-issue.
I was also lucky enough to score a hooded sweatshirt from NY’s Aimé Leon Dore. While I regret my inability to purchase it earlier in the year, wherein its heft would have proved useful, there’s no denying it’s a well made piece. Insulated with denim fabric and made of a heavyweight terry cotton it forms a crucial foundation in casual outfits meant for tackling wind, rain, and sudden cold snaps. The side vents, though not asymmetric, are a nice detail that don’t scream out for attention. Best to let people notice these things gradually.
Overall I’ve been indulging my fledgling appetite for casual clothing more these days. With precious little time left at university I need to make up for lost opportunities by dressing as cosily as possible. It’s just a shame that, in this part of the world, the next few months (leading toward Christmas) are going to make playing the layer game so difficult. Nobody wants to be that guy with a bad case of swamp butt. 
Folk coated mac (raincoat/throwover/all-purpose straight up banger)
Aime Leon Dore hooded sweatshirt 
Maison Kitsune marled grey tee
Everest Isles ‘Mayol’ trunks (they make great shorts, cut with a high rise)
Nike Lunarglide All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 26-08-2014 
STYLE | ETERNITY
OOTD 02-09-2014
As a law kid and fetishist for rule based deductions, I inevitably lump everything into categories.
So it goes, with outfits, I find my style diffusing at any given time into one of two categories. A more traditional tailored offering - ties, pochettes, hardbottoms. Then, increasingly, lightweight outerwear coupled with some form of technical sneakers. I’m hardly reinventing the wheel but the clear delineation between the two makes all the difference when getting dressed in a hurry. With winter well and truly over, afternoons in the sunshine state can get rather humid. Despite the relative humidity, rain can kick in at a moment’s notice. This coupled with strong winds means a secondary layer - while not crucial - is always ideal.
Lately I’ve been getting a lot of utility from my Folk raincoat. The UK based ready-to-wear brand has always had a robust selection of outerwear and this staple certainly doesn’t buck that trend. Made with wooden buttons and a storm shield, it maintains its elasticity at all times. This makes it perfect to scrunch up in a bag and drape over whatever outfit you’ve decided on for the day. And in the navy colourway: well, blocking is a non-issue.
I was also lucky enough to score a hooded sweatshirt from NY’s Aimé Leon Dore. While I regret my inability to purchase it earlier in the year, wherein its heft would have proved useful, there’s no denying it’s a well made piece. Insulated with denim fabric and made of a heavyweight terry cotton it forms a crucial foundation in casual outfits meant for tackling wind, rain, and sudden cold snaps. The side vents, though not asymmetric, are a nice detail that don’t scream out for attention. Best to let people notice these things gradually.
Overall I’ve been indulging my fledgling appetite for casual clothing more these days. With precious little time left at university I need to make up for lost opportunities by dressing as cosily as possible. It’s just a shame that, in this part of the world, the next few months (leading toward Christmas) are going to make playing the layer game so difficult. Nobody wants to be that guy with a bad case of swamp butt. 
Folk coated mac (raincoat/throwover/all-purpose straight up banger)
Aime Leon Dore hooded sweatshirt 
Maison Kitsune marled grey tee
Everest Isles ‘Mayol’ trunks (they make great shorts, cut with a high rise)
Nike Lunarglide All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 26-08-2014 
STYLE | ETERNITY
OOTD 02-09-2014
As a law kid and fetishist for rule based deductions, I inevitably lump everything into categories.
So it goes, with outfits, I find my style diffusing at any given time into one of two categories. A more traditional tailored offering - ties, pochettes, hardbottoms. Then, increasingly, lightweight outerwear coupled with some form of technical sneakers. I’m hardly reinventing the wheel but the clear delineation between the two makes all the difference when getting dressed in a hurry. With winter well and truly over, afternoons in the sunshine state can get rather humid. Despite the relative humidity, rain can kick in at a moment’s notice. This coupled with strong winds means a secondary layer - while not crucial - is always ideal.
Lately I’ve been getting a lot of utility from my Folk raincoat. The UK based ready-to-wear brand has always had a robust selection of outerwear and this staple certainly doesn’t buck that trend. Made with wooden buttons and a storm shield, it maintains its elasticity at all times. This makes it perfect to scrunch up in a bag and drape over whatever outfit you’ve decided on for the day. And in the navy colourway: well, blocking is a non-issue.
I was also lucky enough to score a hooded sweatshirt from NY’s Aimé Leon Dore. While I regret my inability to purchase it earlier in the year, wherein its heft would have proved useful, there’s no denying it’s a well made piece. Insulated with denim fabric and made of a heavyweight terry cotton it forms a crucial foundation in casual outfits meant for tackling wind, rain, and sudden cold snaps. The side vents, though not asymmetric, are a nice detail that don’t scream out for attention. Best to let people notice these things gradually.
Overall I’ve been indulging my fledgling appetite for casual clothing more these days. With precious little time left at university I need to make up for lost opportunities by dressing as cosily as possible. It’s just a shame that, in this part of the world, the next few months (leading toward Christmas) are going to make playing the layer game so difficult. Nobody wants to be that guy with a bad case of swamp butt. 
Folk coated mac (raincoat/throwover/all-purpose straight up banger)
Aime Leon Dore hooded sweatshirt 
Maison Kitsune marled grey tee
Everest Isles ‘Mayol’ trunks (they make great shorts, cut with a high rise)
Nike Lunarglide All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 26-08-2014 
STYLE | ETERNITY
OOTD 02-09-2014
As a law kid and fetishist for rule based deductions, I inevitably lump everything into categories.
So it goes, with outfits, I find my style diffusing at any given time into one of two categories. A more traditional tailored offering - ties, pochettes, hardbottoms. Then, increasingly, lightweight outerwear coupled with some form of technical sneakers. I’m hardly reinventing the wheel but the clear delineation between the two makes all the difference when getting dressed in a hurry. With winter well and truly over, afternoons in the sunshine state can get rather humid. Despite the relative humidity, rain can kick in at a moment’s notice. This coupled with strong winds means a secondary layer - while not crucial - is always ideal.
Lately I’ve been getting a lot of utility from my Folk raincoat. The UK based ready-to-wear brand has always had a robust selection of outerwear and this staple certainly doesn’t buck that trend. Made with wooden buttons and a storm shield, it maintains its elasticity at all times. This makes it perfect to scrunch up in a bag and drape over whatever outfit you’ve decided on for the day. And in the navy colourway: well, blocking is a non-issue.
I was also lucky enough to score a hooded sweatshirt from NY’s Aimé Leon Dore. While I regret my inability to purchase it earlier in the year, wherein its heft would have proved useful, there’s no denying it’s a well made piece. Insulated with denim fabric and made of a heavyweight terry cotton it forms a crucial foundation in casual outfits meant for tackling wind, rain, and sudden cold snaps. The side vents, though not asymmetric, are a nice detail that don’t scream out for attention. Best to let people notice these things gradually.
Overall I’ve been indulging my fledgling appetite for casual clothing more these days. With precious little time left at university I need to make up for lost opportunities by dressing as cosily as possible. It’s just a shame that, in this part of the world, the next few months (leading toward Christmas) are going to make playing the layer game so difficult. Nobody wants to be that guy with a bad case of swamp butt. 
Folk coated mac (raincoat/throwover/all-purpose straight up banger)
Aime Leon Dore hooded sweatshirt 
Maison Kitsune marled grey tee
Everest Isles ‘Mayol’ trunks (they make great shorts, cut with a high rise)
Nike Lunarglide All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 26-08-2014 
STYLE | ETERNITY

OOTD 02-09-2014

As a law kid and fetishist for rule based deductions, I inevitably lump everything into categories.

So it goes, with outfits, I find my style diffusing at any given time into one of two categories. A more traditional tailored offering - ties, pochettes, hardbottoms. Then, increasingly, lightweight outerwear coupled with some form of technical sneakers. I’m hardly reinventing the wheel but the clear delineation between the two makes all the difference when getting dressed in a hurry. With winter well and truly over, afternoons in the sunshine state can get rather humid. Despite the relative humidity, rain can kick in at a moment’s notice. This coupled with strong winds means a secondary layer - while not crucial - is always ideal.

Lately I’ve been getting a lot of utility from my Folk raincoat. The UK based ready-to-wear brand has always had a robust selection of outerwear and this staple certainly doesn’t buck that trend. Made with wooden buttons and a storm shield, it maintains its elasticity at all times. This makes it perfect to scrunch up in a bag and drape over whatever outfit you’ve decided on for the day. And in the navy colourway: well, blocking is a non-issue.

I was also lucky enough to score a hooded sweatshirt from NY’s Aimé Leon Dore. While I regret my inability to purchase it earlier in the year, wherein its heft would have proved useful, there’s no denying it’s a well made piece. Insulated with denim fabric and made of a heavyweight terry cotton it forms a crucial foundation in casual outfits meant for tackling wind, rain, and sudden cold snaps. The side vents, though not asymmetric, are a nice detail that don’t scream out for attention. Best to let people notice these things gradually.

Overall I’ve been indulging my fledgling appetite for casual clothing more these days. With precious little time left at university I need to make up for lost opportunities by dressing as cosily as possible. It’s just a shame that, in this part of the world, the next few months (leading toward Christmas) are going to make playing the layer game so difficult. Nobody wants to be that guy with a bad case of swamp butt. 

Folk coated mac (raincoat/throwover/all-purpose straight up banger)

Aime Leon Dore hooded sweatshirt 

Maison Kitsune marled grey tee

Everest Isles ‘Mayol’ trunks (they make great shorts, cut with a high rise)

Nike Lunarglide 
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 26-08-2014 

STYLE | ETERNITY