Whether there is an intended rivalry between Garrett and Larry Leight is debatable, but the father and son duo continue to one-up each other in a market infected with big logos, garish colorways and staid design (something to do with Luxxotica’s domination over the luxury eyewear market). Their competitors are many, their equals few. 
Both Oliver Peoples and Garrett Leight represent a standard of production that has become something of a historical rarity. Two tone acetate, machine welded temples and hand finishing are not commonalities in today’s average sunglass - I can name maybe 2 other brands (of this size) that are this exacting.  
I also have a fondness for their versatility (an admittedly overused word): both pairs may be worn as prescription glasses - with that great keyhole bridge - and come in unobtrusive darker shades of tortoiseshell. Its a colorway that is often mishandled, but here the graduation of mottling (on both pairs) makes for a very authentic sense of antiquing.  
Obviously, as a poor no name student, I gravitate more toward the Garrett Leights (which are less than half the price of their OP counterparts) but for the man with the wallet and an appreciation of accoutrements the OP x Maison Kitsune pair is excellent. The multiple gold wire details on the detachable front are nothing short of classic. 
Available at Mr Porter
Whether there is an intended rivalry between Garrett and Larry Leight is debatable, but the father and son duo continue to one-up each other in a market infected with big logos, garish colorways and staid design (something to do with Luxxotica’s domination over the luxury eyewear market). Their competitors are many, their equals few. 
Both Oliver Peoples and Garrett Leight represent a standard of production that has become something of a historical rarity. Two tone acetate, machine welded temples and hand finishing are not commonalities in today’s average sunglass - I can name maybe 2 other brands (of this size) that are this exacting.  
I also have a fondness for their versatility (an admittedly overused word): both pairs may be worn as prescription glasses - with that great keyhole bridge - and come in unobtrusive darker shades of tortoiseshell. Its a colorway that is often mishandled, but here the graduation of mottling (on both pairs) makes for a very authentic sense of antiquing.  
Obviously, as a poor no name student, I gravitate more toward the Garrett Leights (which are less than half the price of their OP counterparts) but for the man with the wallet and an appreciation of accoutrements the OP x Maison Kitsune pair is excellent. The multiple gold wire details on the detachable front are nothing short of classic. 
Available at Mr Porter

Whether there is an intended rivalry between Garrett and Larry Leight is debatable, but the father and son duo continue to one-up each other in a market infected with big logos, garish colorways and staid design (something to do with Luxxotica’s domination over the luxury eyewear market). Their competitors are many, their equals few.

Both Oliver Peoples and Garrett Leight represent a standard of production that has become something of a historical rarity. Two tone acetate, machine welded temples and hand finishing are not commonalities in today’s average sunglass - I can name maybe 2 other brands (of this size) that are this exacting. 

I also have a fondness for their versatility (an admittedly overused word): both pairs may be worn as prescription glasses - with that great keyhole bridge - and come in unobtrusive darker shades of tortoiseshell. Its a colorway that is often mishandled, but here the graduation of mottling (on both pairs) makes for a very authentic sense of antiquing. 

Obviously, as a poor no name student, I gravitate more toward the Garrett Leights (which are less than half the price of their OP counterparts) but for the man with the wallet and an appreciation of accoutrements the OP x Maison Kitsune pair is excellent. The multiple gold wire details on the detachable front are nothing short of classic.

Available at Mr Porter

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