Stefano Pilati’s Paris Duplex After all the fanfare that Architectural Digest’s coverage of Thom Browne’s apartment drew, I spent a good couple of hours scrawling through the acclaimed design magazine looking for other designers and AD’s coverage of their homes. 
Enter Stefano Pilati, creative director for Yves Saint Laurent since 2001, now at Ermenegildo Zegna. Pilati’s ready to wear collections have always drawn from a wealth of eclectic inspiration: his penchant is for the use of varied cultural and geographical references which he employs to great effect inside his own home. North African masks share prime Parisian real estate with Imperial Chinese rugs and one off photographs by Juergen Teller. There’s even a beautifully maintained Louis XVI writing desk, from a time when the Bourbon Kings ruled France. 
The warmth and multifaceted inspirations in Pilati’s home are to my mind far more welcoming than TB’s sparse Greenwich apartment. There’s very little negative space in Pilati’s duplex, and an increased size allows the Zegna creative director a means to fill his home with all sorts of contrasting minutiae, a progression - never jarring - of color and cultures mingling in the space.  
These sometimes lavish, always luxurious living spaces inhabited by designers always strike a chord. Its reassuring to see that the aesthetic inclinations that inform Pilati’s work are also part of his day to day life. It could be said that there is some sincerity in that fact. 
(Source: Architectural Digest) 
STYLETERNITY
Stefano Pilati’s Paris Duplex After all the fanfare that Architectural Digest’s coverage of Thom Browne’s apartment drew, I spent a good couple of hours scrawling through the acclaimed design magazine looking for other designers and AD’s coverage of their homes. 
Enter Stefano Pilati, creative director for Yves Saint Laurent since 2001, now at Ermenegildo Zegna. Pilati’s ready to wear collections have always drawn from a wealth of eclectic inspiration: his penchant is for the use of varied cultural and geographical references which he employs to great effect inside his own home. North African masks share prime Parisian real estate with Imperial Chinese rugs and one off photographs by Juergen Teller. There’s even a beautifully maintained Louis XVI writing desk, from a time when the Bourbon Kings ruled France. 
The warmth and multifaceted inspirations in Pilati’s home are to my mind far more welcoming than TB’s sparse Greenwich apartment. There’s very little negative space in Pilati’s duplex, and an increased size allows the Zegna creative director a means to fill his home with all sorts of contrasting minutiae, a progression - never jarring - of color and cultures mingling in the space.  
These sometimes lavish, always luxurious living spaces inhabited by designers always strike a chord. Its reassuring to see that the aesthetic inclinations that inform Pilati’s work are also part of his day to day life. It could be said that there is some sincerity in that fact. 
(Source: Architectural Digest) 
STYLETERNITY
Stefano Pilati’s Paris Duplex After all the fanfare that Architectural Digest’s coverage of Thom Browne’s apartment drew, I spent a good couple of hours scrawling through the acclaimed design magazine looking for other designers and AD’s coverage of their homes. 
Enter Stefano Pilati, creative director for Yves Saint Laurent since 2001, now at Ermenegildo Zegna. Pilati’s ready to wear collections have always drawn from a wealth of eclectic inspiration: his penchant is for the use of varied cultural and geographical references which he employs to great effect inside his own home. North African masks share prime Parisian real estate with Imperial Chinese rugs and one off photographs by Juergen Teller. There’s even a beautifully maintained Louis XVI writing desk, from a time when the Bourbon Kings ruled France. 
The warmth and multifaceted inspirations in Pilati’s home are to my mind far more welcoming than TB’s sparse Greenwich apartment. There’s very little negative space in Pilati’s duplex, and an increased size allows the Zegna creative director a means to fill his home with all sorts of contrasting minutiae, a progression - never jarring - of color and cultures mingling in the space.  
These sometimes lavish, always luxurious living spaces inhabited by designers always strike a chord. Its reassuring to see that the aesthetic inclinations that inform Pilati’s work are also part of his day to day life. It could be said that there is some sincerity in that fact. 
(Source: Architectural Digest) 
STYLETERNITY
Stefano Pilati’s Paris Duplex After all the fanfare that Architectural Digest’s coverage of Thom Browne’s apartment drew, I spent a good couple of hours scrawling through the acclaimed design magazine looking for other designers and AD’s coverage of their homes. 
Enter Stefano Pilati, creative director for Yves Saint Laurent since 2001, now at Ermenegildo Zegna. Pilati’s ready to wear collections have always drawn from a wealth of eclectic inspiration: his penchant is for the use of varied cultural and geographical references which he employs to great effect inside his own home. North African masks share prime Parisian real estate with Imperial Chinese rugs and one off photographs by Juergen Teller. There’s even a beautifully maintained Louis XVI writing desk, from a time when the Bourbon Kings ruled France. 
The warmth and multifaceted inspirations in Pilati’s home are to my mind far more welcoming than TB’s sparse Greenwich apartment. There’s very little negative space in Pilati’s duplex, and an increased size allows the Zegna creative director a means to fill his home with all sorts of contrasting minutiae, a progression - never jarring - of color and cultures mingling in the space.  
These sometimes lavish, always luxurious living spaces inhabited by designers always strike a chord. Its reassuring to see that the aesthetic inclinations that inform Pilati’s work are also part of his day to day life. It could be said that there is some sincerity in that fact. 
(Source: Architectural Digest) 
STYLETERNITY

Stefano Pilati’s Paris Duplex
After all the fanfare that Architectural Digest’s coverage of Thom Browne’s apartment drew, I spent a good couple of hours scrawling through the acclaimed design magazine looking for other designers and AD’s coverage of their homes.

Enter Stefano Pilati, creative director for Yves Saint Laurent since 2001, now at Ermenegildo Zegna. Pilati’s ready to wear collections have always drawn from a wealth of eclectic inspiration: his penchant is for the use of varied cultural and geographical references which he employs to great effect inside his own home. North African masks share prime Parisian real estate with Imperial Chinese rugs and one off photographs by Juergen Teller. There’s even a beautifully maintained Louis XVI writing desk, from a time when the Bourbon Kings ruled France.

The warmth and multifaceted inspirations in Pilati’s home are to my mind far more welcoming than TB’s sparse Greenwich apartment. There’s very little negative space in Pilati’s duplex, and an increased size allows the Zegna creative director a means to fill his home with all sorts of contrasting minutiae, a progression - never jarring - of color and cultures mingling in the space. 

These sometimes lavish, always luxurious living spaces inhabited by designers always strike a chord. Its reassuring to see that the aesthetic inclinations that inform Pilati’s work are also part of his day to day life. It could be said that there is some sincerity in that fact.

(Source: Architectural Digest)

STYLETERNITY

AMI Spring Summer 2014 retrospective Despite one’s initial assumptions, I’ve been writing less and less about fashion week collections since I started on the Pinz. The majority of the collection reviews I conduct are no longer ‘fresh off the presses’ runway stuff and with an almanac of bloggers - each more eloquent than I - who actually get paid to give their opinions, there really isn’t a need for more subjective drivel poisoning the internet. For AMI though, I’ll make an exception and get down to brass tacks, just like the old days (but seriously, don’t ever go through my fucking archive, its embarrassing). 
At present, I only own two pieces (both from FW 2012) by the young French designer, but it would seem to me that Alexandre Mattiussi is hitting a consistent stride. AMI’s brand imagery is already quite strong, conjuring images of the nonchalantly well dressed man. The AMI style has a sort of unfussy and unctuous quality about it that makes the brand’s clothing feel like it exists in the real world, outside the bubble of haute couture and on the backs of real men, each a fleshed out individual. Mattiussi has opted to continue the theme of transportation in his SS 2014 offering, with an emphasis this time round on the sky rather than the ground. These are not the clothes of the movie star jet setting to Cannes, rather they encapsulate a wide array of quietly stylish travellers circa French airports in the 1960’s. 
A number of the collection’s items make repeat appearances, emphasizing the versatility of the sportcoat and trouser separates that pepper this season. Here, Mattiussi envisions a traveller, mixing a limited number of garments he has literally out of his suitcase, breathing new life into his style by mixing old gear in new ways. 
On a personal level, the integral test of good style involves a positive assessment from the everyman. An admission by those not necessarily interested/invested in menswear that a brand’s clothes still look good. Countless people who I have talked to love AMI, men from all walks of life (indeed the many types of men that Mattiussi was influenced by when designing his latest offering) can find some point of attack, whether it be bird prints or smartly tapered dad denim. This figures decisively in my glowing assessment of the brand: almost anybody can pick up an article of AMI clothing and recognise it not as a ‘luxury garment’, ‘a brand’ or ‘fashion’ but simply as relaxed and timeless clothing. Few ‘fashion’ designers are yet to master toeing the line between sincerity and contemporary cool, yet AMI is leaping ahead in this area.
You can peep the entirety of the collection here (including a similarly glowing yet much more succinct review) 
STYLETERNITY
AMI Spring Summer 2014 retrospective Despite one’s initial assumptions, I’ve been writing less and less about fashion week collections since I started on the Pinz. The majority of the collection reviews I conduct are no longer ‘fresh off the presses’ runway stuff and with an almanac of bloggers - each more eloquent than I - who actually get paid to give their opinions, there really isn’t a need for more subjective drivel poisoning the internet. For AMI though, I’ll make an exception and get down to brass tacks, just like the old days (but seriously, don’t ever go through my fucking archive, its embarrassing). 
At present, I only own two pieces (both from FW 2012) by the young French designer, but it would seem to me that Alexandre Mattiussi is hitting a consistent stride. AMI’s brand imagery is already quite strong, conjuring images of the nonchalantly well dressed man. The AMI style has a sort of unfussy and unctuous quality about it that makes the brand’s clothing feel like it exists in the real world, outside the bubble of haute couture and on the backs of real men, each a fleshed out individual. Mattiussi has opted to continue the theme of transportation in his SS 2014 offering, with an emphasis this time round on the sky rather than the ground. These are not the clothes of the movie star jet setting to Cannes, rather they encapsulate a wide array of quietly stylish travellers circa French airports in the 1960’s. 
A number of the collection’s items make repeat appearances, emphasizing the versatility of the sportcoat and trouser separates that pepper this season. Here, Mattiussi envisions a traveller, mixing a limited number of garments he has literally out of his suitcase, breathing new life into his style by mixing old gear in new ways. 
On a personal level, the integral test of good style involves a positive assessment from the everyman. An admission by those not necessarily interested/invested in menswear that a brand’s clothes still look good. Countless people who I have talked to love AMI, men from all walks of life (indeed the many types of men that Mattiussi was influenced by when designing his latest offering) can find some point of attack, whether it be bird prints or smartly tapered dad denim. This figures decisively in my glowing assessment of the brand: almost anybody can pick up an article of AMI clothing and recognise it not as a ‘luxury garment’, ‘a brand’ or ‘fashion’ but simply as relaxed and timeless clothing. Few ‘fashion’ designers are yet to master toeing the line between sincerity and contemporary cool, yet AMI is leaping ahead in this area.
You can peep the entirety of the collection here (including a similarly glowing yet much more succinct review) 
STYLETERNITY
AMI Spring Summer 2014 retrospective Despite one’s initial assumptions, I’ve been writing less and less about fashion week collections since I started on the Pinz. The majority of the collection reviews I conduct are no longer ‘fresh off the presses’ runway stuff and with an almanac of bloggers - each more eloquent than I - who actually get paid to give their opinions, there really isn’t a need for more subjective drivel poisoning the internet. For AMI though, I’ll make an exception and get down to brass tacks, just like the old days (but seriously, don’t ever go through my fucking archive, its embarrassing). 
At present, I only own two pieces (both from FW 2012) by the young French designer, but it would seem to me that Alexandre Mattiussi is hitting a consistent stride. AMI’s brand imagery is already quite strong, conjuring images of the nonchalantly well dressed man. The AMI style has a sort of unfussy and unctuous quality about it that makes the brand’s clothing feel like it exists in the real world, outside the bubble of haute couture and on the backs of real men, each a fleshed out individual. Mattiussi has opted to continue the theme of transportation in his SS 2014 offering, with an emphasis this time round on the sky rather than the ground. These are not the clothes of the movie star jet setting to Cannes, rather they encapsulate a wide array of quietly stylish travellers circa French airports in the 1960’s. 
A number of the collection’s items make repeat appearances, emphasizing the versatility of the sportcoat and trouser separates that pepper this season. Here, Mattiussi envisions a traveller, mixing a limited number of garments he has literally out of his suitcase, breathing new life into his style by mixing old gear in new ways. 
On a personal level, the integral test of good style involves a positive assessment from the everyman. An admission by those not necessarily interested/invested in menswear that a brand’s clothes still look good. Countless people who I have talked to love AMI, men from all walks of life (indeed the many types of men that Mattiussi was influenced by when designing his latest offering) can find some point of attack, whether it be bird prints or smartly tapered dad denim. This figures decisively in my glowing assessment of the brand: almost anybody can pick up an article of AMI clothing and recognise it not as a ‘luxury garment’, ‘a brand’ or ‘fashion’ but simply as relaxed and timeless clothing. Few ‘fashion’ designers are yet to master toeing the line between sincerity and contemporary cool, yet AMI is leaping ahead in this area.
You can peep the entirety of the collection here (including a similarly glowing yet much more succinct review) 
STYLETERNITY
AMI Spring Summer 2014 retrospective Despite one’s initial assumptions, I’ve been writing less and less about fashion week collections since I started on the Pinz. The majority of the collection reviews I conduct are no longer ‘fresh off the presses’ runway stuff and with an almanac of bloggers - each more eloquent than I - who actually get paid to give their opinions, there really isn’t a need for more subjective drivel poisoning the internet. For AMI though, I’ll make an exception and get down to brass tacks, just like the old days (but seriously, don’t ever go through my fucking archive, its embarrassing). 
At present, I only own two pieces (both from FW 2012) by the young French designer, but it would seem to me that Alexandre Mattiussi is hitting a consistent stride. AMI’s brand imagery is already quite strong, conjuring images of the nonchalantly well dressed man. The AMI style has a sort of unfussy and unctuous quality about it that makes the brand’s clothing feel like it exists in the real world, outside the bubble of haute couture and on the backs of real men, each a fleshed out individual. Mattiussi has opted to continue the theme of transportation in his SS 2014 offering, with an emphasis this time round on the sky rather than the ground. These are not the clothes of the movie star jet setting to Cannes, rather they encapsulate a wide array of quietly stylish travellers circa French airports in the 1960’s. 
A number of the collection’s items make repeat appearances, emphasizing the versatility of the sportcoat and trouser separates that pepper this season. Here, Mattiussi envisions a traveller, mixing a limited number of garments he has literally out of his suitcase, breathing new life into his style by mixing old gear in new ways. 
On a personal level, the integral test of good style involves a positive assessment from the everyman. An admission by those not necessarily interested/invested in menswear that a brand’s clothes still look good. Countless people who I have talked to love AMI, men from all walks of life (indeed the many types of men that Mattiussi was influenced by when designing his latest offering) can find some point of attack, whether it be bird prints or smartly tapered dad denim. This figures decisively in my glowing assessment of the brand: almost anybody can pick up an article of AMI clothing and recognise it not as a ‘luxury garment’, ‘a brand’ or ‘fashion’ but simply as relaxed and timeless clothing. Few ‘fashion’ designers are yet to master toeing the line between sincerity and contemporary cool, yet AMI is leaping ahead in this area.
You can peep the entirety of the collection here (including a similarly glowing yet much more succinct review) 
STYLETERNITY
AMI Spring Summer 2014 retrospective Despite one’s initial assumptions, I’ve been writing less and less about fashion week collections since I started on the Pinz. The majority of the collection reviews I conduct are no longer ‘fresh off the presses’ runway stuff and with an almanac of bloggers - each more eloquent than I - who actually get paid to give their opinions, there really isn’t a need for more subjective drivel poisoning the internet. For AMI though, I’ll make an exception and get down to brass tacks, just like the old days (but seriously, don’t ever go through my fucking archive, its embarrassing). 
At present, I only own two pieces (both from FW 2012) by the young French designer, but it would seem to me that Alexandre Mattiussi is hitting a consistent stride. AMI’s brand imagery is already quite strong, conjuring images of the nonchalantly well dressed man. The AMI style has a sort of unfussy and unctuous quality about it that makes the brand’s clothing feel like it exists in the real world, outside the bubble of haute couture and on the backs of real men, each a fleshed out individual. Mattiussi has opted to continue the theme of transportation in his SS 2014 offering, with an emphasis this time round on the sky rather than the ground. These are not the clothes of the movie star jet setting to Cannes, rather they encapsulate a wide array of quietly stylish travellers circa French airports in the 1960’s. 
A number of the collection’s items make repeat appearances, emphasizing the versatility of the sportcoat and trouser separates that pepper this season. Here, Mattiussi envisions a traveller, mixing a limited number of garments he has literally out of his suitcase, breathing new life into his style by mixing old gear in new ways. 
On a personal level, the integral test of good style involves a positive assessment from the everyman. An admission by those not necessarily interested/invested in menswear that a brand’s clothes still look good. Countless people who I have talked to love AMI, men from all walks of life (indeed the many types of men that Mattiussi was influenced by when designing his latest offering) can find some point of attack, whether it be bird prints or smartly tapered dad denim. This figures decisively in my glowing assessment of the brand: almost anybody can pick up an article of AMI clothing and recognise it not as a ‘luxury garment’, ‘a brand’ or ‘fashion’ but simply as relaxed and timeless clothing. Few ‘fashion’ designers are yet to master toeing the line between sincerity and contemporary cool, yet AMI is leaping ahead in this area.
You can peep the entirety of the collection here (including a similarly glowing yet much more succinct review) 
STYLETERNITY
AMI Spring Summer 2014 retrospective Despite one’s initial assumptions, I’ve been writing less and less about fashion week collections since I started on the Pinz. The majority of the collection reviews I conduct are no longer ‘fresh off the presses’ runway stuff and with an almanac of bloggers - each more eloquent than I - who actually get paid to give their opinions, there really isn’t a need for more subjective drivel poisoning the internet. For AMI though, I’ll make an exception and get down to brass tacks, just like the old days (but seriously, don’t ever go through my fucking archive, its embarrassing). 
At present, I only own two pieces (both from FW 2012) by the young French designer, but it would seem to me that Alexandre Mattiussi is hitting a consistent stride. AMI’s brand imagery is already quite strong, conjuring images of the nonchalantly well dressed man. The AMI style has a sort of unfussy and unctuous quality about it that makes the brand’s clothing feel like it exists in the real world, outside the bubble of haute couture and on the backs of real men, each a fleshed out individual. Mattiussi has opted to continue the theme of transportation in his SS 2014 offering, with an emphasis this time round on the sky rather than the ground. These are not the clothes of the movie star jet setting to Cannes, rather they encapsulate a wide array of quietly stylish travellers circa French airports in the 1960’s. 
A number of the collection’s items make repeat appearances, emphasizing the versatility of the sportcoat and trouser separates that pepper this season. Here, Mattiussi envisions a traveller, mixing a limited number of garments he has literally out of his suitcase, breathing new life into his style by mixing old gear in new ways. 
On a personal level, the integral test of good style involves a positive assessment from the everyman. An admission by those not necessarily interested/invested in menswear that a brand’s clothes still look good. Countless people who I have talked to love AMI, men from all walks of life (indeed the many types of men that Mattiussi was influenced by when designing his latest offering) can find some point of attack, whether it be bird prints or smartly tapered dad denim. This figures decisively in my glowing assessment of the brand: almost anybody can pick up an article of AMI clothing and recognise it not as a ‘luxury garment’, ‘a brand’ or ‘fashion’ but simply as relaxed and timeless clothing. Few ‘fashion’ designers are yet to master toeing the line between sincerity and contemporary cool, yet AMI is leaping ahead in this area.
You can peep the entirety of the collection here (including a similarly glowing yet much more succinct review) 
STYLETERNITY

AMI Spring Summer 2014 retrospective 

Despite one’s initial assumptions, I’ve been writing less and less about fashion week collections since I started on the Pinz. The majority of the collection reviews I conduct are no longer ‘fresh off the presses’ runway stuff and with an almanac of bloggers - each more eloquent than I - who actually get paid to give their opinions, there really isn’t a need for more subjective drivel poisoning the internet. For AMI though, I’ll make an exception and get down to brass tacks, just like the old days (but seriously, don’t ever go through my fucking archive, its embarrassing). 

At present, I only own two pieces (both from FW 2012) by the young French designer, but it would seem to me that Alexandre Mattiussi is hitting a consistent stride. AMI’s brand imagery is already quite strong, conjuring images of the nonchalantly well dressed man. The AMI style has a sort of unfussy and unctuous quality about it that makes the brand’s clothing feel like it exists in the real world, outside the bubble of haute couture and on the backs of real men, each a fleshed out individual. Mattiussi has opted to continue the theme of transportation in his SS 2014 offering, with an emphasis this time round on the sky rather than the ground. These are not the clothes of the movie star jet setting to Cannes, rather they encapsulate a wide array of quietly stylish travellers circa French airports in the 1960’s. 

A number of the collection’s items make repeat appearances, emphasizing the versatility of the sportcoat and trouser separates that pepper this season. Here, Mattiussi envisions a traveller, mixing a limited number of garments he has literally out of his suitcase, breathing new life into his style by mixing old gear in new ways. 

On a personal level, the integral test of good style involves a positive assessment from the everyman. An admission by those not necessarily interested/invested in menswear that a brand’s clothes still look good. Countless people who I have talked to love AMI, men from all walks of life (indeed the many types of men that Mattiussi was influenced by when designing his latest offering) can find some point of attack, whether it be bird prints or smartly tapered dad denim. This figures decisively in my glowing assessment of the brand: almost anybody can pick up an article of AMI clothing and recognise it not as a ‘luxury garment’, ‘a brand’ or ‘fashion’ but simply as relaxed and timeless clothing. Few ‘fashion’ designers are yet to master toeing the line between sincerity and contemporary cool, yet AMI is leaping ahead in this area.

You can peep the entirety of the collection here (including a similarly glowing yet much more succinct review) 

STYLETERNITY

RELEVANCE X MODERNITY
January 22, 2012
Lanvin has debuted its 2012 Fall collection, and as always creative director Alber Elbaz has displayed his fondness for Lanvin’s mastery over both heritage and relevance. "Its not modernity that’s important, its relevance" said Elbaz at the outset of the show, setting the tone for this season’s must have look: the suit.
But as per usual, Lanvin are not interested in the simple extension of men’s suiting traditions and have turned to sport and the elements to infuse their latest fall collection. Under the creative direction of Mr Lucas Ossendrijver, this Lanvin collection combines the aesthetic of vintage boxers, mountaineers and street style with that of the traditional Lanvin suiting luxury. Alongside the overcoats and denim, the collection included souped-up boxer’s boots and puffer coats to clothe the suited homme against the elements of Paris (and indeed Europe’s) cold windy January. 
Though this collection caps a period of creative reserve in Lanvin’s recent years, Ossendrijver and Elbaz prove once again that they understand to an exacting toll what the Lanvin aesthetic is famed for: elegant pared back luxury reinforced by one or two stand-out items that give added depth to the ensemble. 
RELEVANCE X MODERNITY
January 22, 2012
Lanvin has debuted its 2012 Fall collection, and as always creative director Alber Elbaz has displayed his fondness for Lanvin’s mastery over both heritage and relevance. "Its not modernity that’s important, its relevance" said Elbaz at the outset of the show, setting the tone for this season’s must have look: the suit.
But as per usual, Lanvin are not interested in the simple extension of men’s suiting traditions and have turned to sport and the elements to infuse their latest fall collection. Under the creative direction of Mr Lucas Ossendrijver, this Lanvin collection combines the aesthetic of vintage boxers, mountaineers and street style with that of the traditional Lanvin suiting luxury. Alongside the overcoats and denim, the collection included souped-up boxer’s boots and puffer coats to clothe the suited homme against the elements of Paris (and indeed Europe’s) cold windy January. 
Though this collection caps a period of creative reserve in Lanvin’s recent years, Ossendrijver and Elbaz prove once again that they understand to an exacting toll what the Lanvin aesthetic is famed for: elegant pared back luxury reinforced by one or two stand-out items that give added depth to the ensemble. 
RELEVANCE X MODERNITY
January 22, 2012
Lanvin has debuted its 2012 Fall collection, and as always creative director Alber Elbaz has displayed his fondness for Lanvin’s mastery over both heritage and relevance. "Its not modernity that’s important, its relevance" said Elbaz at the outset of the show, setting the tone for this season’s must have look: the suit.
But as per usual, Lanvin are not interested in the simple extension of men’s suiting traditions and have turned to sport and the elements to infuse their latest fall collection. Under the creative direction of Mr Lucas Ossendrijver, this Lanvin collection combines the aesthetic of vintage boxers, mountaineers and street style with that of the traditional Lanvin suiting luxury. Alongside the overcoats and denim, the collection included souped-up boxer’s boots and puffer coats to clothe the suited homme against the elements of Paris (and indeed Europe’s) cold windy January. 
Though this collection caps a period of creative reserve in Lanvin’s recent years, Ossendrijver and Elbaz prove once again that they understand to an exacting toll what the Lanvin aesthetic is famed for: elegant pared back luxury reinforced by one or two stand-out items that give added depth to the ensemble. 
RELEVANCE X MODERNITY
January 22, 2012
Lanvin has debuted its 2012 Fall collection, and as always creative director Alber Elbaz has displayed his fondness for Lanvin’s mastery over both heritage and relevance. "Its not modernity that’s important, its relevance" said Elbaz at the outset of the show, setting the tone for this season’s must have look: the suit.
But as per usual, Lanvin are not interested in the simple extension of men’s suiting traditions and have turned to sport and the elements to infuse their latest fall collection. Under the creative direction of Mr Lucas Ossendrijver, this Lanvin collection combines the aesthetic of vintage boxers, mountaineers and street style with that of the traditional Lanvin suiting luxury. Alongside the overcoats and denim, the collection included souped-up boxer’s boots and puffer coats to clothe the suited homme against the elements of Paris (and indeed Europe’s) cold windy January. 
Though this collection caps a period of creative reserve in Lanvin’s recent years, Ossendrijver and Elbaz prove once again that they understand to an exacting toll what the Lanvin aesthetic is famed for: elegant pared back luxury reinforced by one or two stand-out items that give added depth to the ensemble. 
RELEVANCE X MODERNITY
January 22, 2012
Lanvin has debuted its 2012 Fall collection, and as always creative director Alber Elbaz has displayed his fondness for Lanvin’s mastery over both heritage and relevance. "Its not modernity that’s important, its relevance" said Elbaz at the outset of the show, setting the tone for this season’s must have look: the suit.
But as per usual, Lanvin are not interested in the simple extension of men’s suiting traditions and have turned to sport and the elements to infuse their latest fall collection. Under the creative direction of Mr Lucas Ossendrijver, this Lanvin collection combines the aesthetic of vintage boxers, mountaineers and street style with that of the traditional Lanvin suiting luxury. Alongside the overcoats and denim, the collection included souped-up boxer’s boots and puffer coats to clothe the suited homme against the elements of Paris (and indeed Europe’s) cold windy January. 
Though this collection caps a period of creative reserve in Lanvin’s recent years, Ossendrijver and Elbaz prove once again that they understand to an exacting toll what the Lanvin aesthetic is famed for: elegant pared back luxury reinforced by one or two stand-out items that give added depth to the ensemble. 
RELEVANCE X MODERNITY
January 22, 2012
Lanvin has debuted its 2012 Fall collection, and as always creative director Alber Elbaz has displayed his fondness for Lanvin’s mastery over both heritage and relevance. "Its not modernity that’s important, its relevance" said Elbaz at the outset of the show, setting the tone for this season’s must have look: the suit.
But as per usual, Lanvin are not interested in the simple extension of men’s suiting traditions and have turned to sport and the elements to infuse their latest fall collection. Under the creative direction of Mr Lucas Ossendrijver, this Lanvin collection combines the aesthetic of vintage boxers, mountaineers and street style with that of the traditional Lanvin suiting luxury. Alongside the overcoats and denim, the collection included souped-up boxer’s boots and puffer coats to clothe the suited homme against the elements of Paris (and indeed Europe’s) cold windy January. 
Though this collection caps a period of creative reserve in Lanvin’s recent years, Ossendrijver and Elbaz prove once again that they understand to an exacting toll what the Lanvin aesthetic is famed for: elegant pared back luxury reinforced by one or two stand-out items that give added depth to the ensemble. 
RELEVANCE X MODERNITY
January 22, 2012
Lanvin has debuted its 2012 Fall collection, and as always creative director Alber Elbaz has displayed his fondness for Lanvin’s mastery over both heritage and relevance. "Its not modernity that’s important, its relevance" said Elbaz at the outset of the show, setting the tone for this season’s must have look: the suit.
But as per usual, Lanvin are not interested in the simple extension of men’s suiting traditions and have turned to sport and the elements to infuse their latest fall collection. Under the creative direction of Mr Lucas Ossendrijver, this Lanvin collection combines the aesthetic of vintage boxers, mountaineers and street style with that of the traditional Lanvin suiting luxury. Alongside the overcoats and denim, the collection included souped-up boxer’s boots and puffer coats to clothe the suited homme against the elements of Paris (and indeed Europe’s) cold windy January. 
Though this collection caps a period of creative reserve in Lanvin’s recent years, Ossendrijver and Elbaz prove once again that they understand to an exacting toll what the Lanvin aesthetic is famed for: elegant pared back luxury reinforced by one or two stand-out items that give added depth to the ensemble. 
RELEVANCE X MODERNITY
January 22, 2012
Lanvin has debuted its 2012 Fall collection, and as always creative director Alber Elbaz has displayed his fondness for Lanvin’s mastery over both heritage and relevance. "Its not modernity that’s important, its relevance" said Elbaz at the outset of the show, setting the tone for this season’s must have look: the suit.
But as per usual, Lanvin are not interested in the simple extension of men’s suiting traditions and have turned to sport and the elements to infuse their latest fall collection. Under the creative direction of Mr Lucas Ossendrijver, this Lanvin collection combines the aesthetic of vintage boxers, mountaineers and street style with that of the traditional Lanvin suiting luxury. Alongside the overcoats and denim, the collection included souped-up boxer’s boots and puffer coats to clothe the suited homme against the elements of Paris (and indeed Europe’s) cold windy January. 
Though this collection caps a period of creative reserve in Lanvin’s recent years, Ossendrijver and Elbaz prove once again that they understand to an exacting toll what the Lanvin aesthetic is famed for: elegant pared back luxury reinforced by one or two stand-out items that give added depth to the ensemble. 
RELEVANCE X MODERNITY
January 22, 2012
Lanvin has debuted its 2012 Fall collection, and as always creative director Alber Elbaz has displayed his fondness for Lanvin’s mastery over both heritage and relevance. "Its not modernity that’s important, its relevance" said Elbaz at the outset of the show, setting the tone for this season’s must have look: the suit.
But as per usual, Lanvin are not interested in the simple extension of men’s suiting traditions and have turned to sport and the elements to infuse their latest fall collection. Under the creative direction of Mr Lucas Ossendrijver, this Lanvin collection combines the aesthetic of vintage boxers, mountaineers and street style with that of the traditional Lanvin suiting luxury. Alongside the overcoats and denim, the collection included souped-up boxer’s boots and puffer coats to clothe the suited homme against the elements of Paris (and indeed Europe’s) cold windy January. 
Though this collection caps a period of creative reserve in Lanvin’s recent years, Ossendrijver and Elbaz prove once again that they understand to an exacting toll what the Lanvin aesthetic is famed for: elegant pared back luxury reinforced by one or two stand-out items that give added depth to the ensemble. 
RELEVANCE X MODERNITY
January 22, 2012
Lanvin has debuted its 2012 Fall collection, and as always creative director Alber Elbaz has displayed his fondness for Lanvin’s mastery over both heritage and relevance. "Its not modernity that’s important, its relevance" said Elbaz at the outset of the show, setting the tone for this season’s must have look: the suit.
But as per usual, Lanvin are not interested in the simple extension of men’s suiting traditions and have turned to sport and the elements to infuse their latest fall collection. Under the creative direction of Mr Lucas Ossendrijver, this Lanvin collection combines the aesthetic of vintage boxers, mountaineers and street style with that of the traditional Lanvin suiting luxury. Alongside the overcoats and denim, the collection included souped-up boxer’s boots and puffer coats to clothe the suited homme against the elements of Paris (and indeed Europe’s) cold windy January. 
Though this collection caps a period of creative reserve in Lanvin’s recent years, Ossendrijver and Elbaz prove once again that they understand to an exacting toll what the Lanvin aesthetic is famed for: elegant pared back luxury reinforced by one or two stand-out items that give added depth to the ensemble. 

RELEVANCE X MODERNITY

January 22, 2012

Lanvin has debuted its 2012 Fall collection, and as always creative director Alber Elbaz has displayed his fondness for Lanvin’s mastery over both heritage and relevance. "Its not modernity that’s important, its relevance" said Elbaz at the outset of the show, setting the tone for this season’s must have look: the suit.

But as per usual, Lanvin are not interested in the simple extension of men’s suiting traditions and have turned to sport and the elements to infuse their latest fall collection. Under the creative direction of Mr Lucas Ossendrijver, this Lanvin collection combines the aesthetic of vintage boxers, mountaineers and street style with that of the traditional Lanvin suiting luxury. Alongside the overcoats and denim, the collection included souped-up boxer’s boots and puffer coats to clothe the suited homme against the elements of Paris (and indeed Europe’s) cold windy January. 

Though this collection caps a period of creative reserve in Lanvin’s recent years, Ossendrijver and Elbaz prove once again that they understand to an exacting toll what the Lanvin aesthetic is famed for: elegant pared back luxury reinforced by one or two stand-out items that give added depth to the ensemble. 

Fan Bingbing- madame of China’s new age silver screen

March 2011, Paris, for V Magazine

Junya Watanabe Spring 2012 RTW collection 
- Watanabe’s Latin American influences are out in force this year, with the designer’s trademark perfecto reconfigured as a bolero and avian headgear designed to evoke feelings of the modern day ‘Latin Dandy’.

Junya Watanabe Spring 2012 RTW collection 

- Watanabe’s Latin American influences are out in force this year, with the designer’s trademark perfecto reconfigured as a bolero and avian headgear designed to evoke feelings of the modern day ‘Latin Dandy’.

So I haven’t had much time as of late to update Style Ist Eternal: but since Milan fashion week is heating up and  summer is around the corner (here in Australia)…now is the perfect time to reflect on some of the most evocative designer runway pieces exhibited this year in menswear at Paris and London fashion week! 
So I haven’t had much time as of late to update Style Ist Eternal: but since Milan fashion week is heating up and  summer is around the corner (here in Australia)…now is the perfect time to reflect on some of the most evocative designer runway pieces exhibited this year in menswear at Paris and London fashion week! 
So I haven’t had much time as of late to update Style Ist Eternal: but since Milan fashion week is heating up and  summer is around the corner (here in Australia)…now is the perfect time to reflect on some of the most evocative designer runway pieces exhibited this year in menswear at Paris and London fashion week! 
So I haven’t had much time as of late to update Style Ist Eternal: but since Milan fashion week is heating up and  summer is around the corner (here in Australia)…now is the perfect time to reflect on some of the most evocative designer runway pieces exhibited this year in menswear at Paris and London fashion week! 
So I haven’t had much time as of late to update Style Ist Eternal: but since Milan fashion week is heating up and  summer is around the corner (here in Australia)…now is the perfect time to reflect on some of the most evocative designer runway pieces exhibited this year in menswear at Paris and London fashion week! 
So I haven’t had much time as of late to update Style Ist Eternal: but since Milan fashion week is heating up and  summer is around the corner (here in Australia)…now is the perfect time to reflect on some of the most evocative designer runway pieces exhibited this year in menswear at Paris and London fashion week! 
So I haven’t had much time as of late to update Style Ist Eternal: but since Milan fashion week is heating up and  summer is around the corner (here in Australia)…now is the perfect time to reflect on some of the most evocative designer runway pieces exhibited this year in menswear at Paris and London fashion week! 
So I haven’t had much time as of late to update Style Ist Eternal: but since Milan fashion week is heating up and  summer is around the corner (here in Australia)…now is the perfect time to reflect on some of the most evocative designer runway pieces exhibited this year in menswear at Paris and London fashion week! 
So I haven’t had much time as of late to update Style Ist Eternal: but since Milan fashion week is heating up and  summer is around the corner (here in Australia)…now is the perfect time to reflect on some of the most evocative designer runway pieces exhibited this year in menswear at Paris and London fashion week! 
So I haven’t had much time as of late to update Style Ist Eternal: but since Milan fashion week is heating up and  summer is around the corner (here in Australia)…now is the perfect time to reflect on some of the most evocative designer runway pieces exhibited this year in menswear at Paris and London fashion week! 

So I haven’t had much time as of late to update Style Ist Eternal: but since Milan fashion week is heating up and  summer is around the corner (here in Australia)…now is the perfect time to reflect on some of the most evocative designer runway pieces exhibited this year in menswear at Paris and London fashion week!