OOTD 12-10-2013
As I edge toward the end of my initial brush with tertiary study its important to stay active in the blogosphere. Just as cramming and daily morning coffee have become a routinized part of my life, so too has musing on well made things and the intersection between fashion and style. I haven’t delivered an outfit post for over 3 months now, and it is with this imbalance in mind that me and master Jeffrey set out to get back into a healthy content making routine. 
I recently managed to extract from Yoox a - relatively - inexpensive Piombo sportcoat. I can’t believe its taken me this long to supplement my wardrobe with such an essential, but in the midst of all my seasonal outerwear fervor priorities fell by the wayside. The navy blazer, in its various iterations, has long been a part of every #menswear subset. Here in Australia, its doubly important to find such an essential in the appropriate material. Piombo makes this incredibly comfortable double breasted version, in washed cotton twill suited to the temperate climate that permeates our everyday lives. Its no surprise that their take embodies the relaxed aesthetic Southern Italians are now (in)famous for but it is exactly this casualness that make it suitable for just about any occasion (I even paired it with sweatpants on one occasion and was no worse for wear). In the interest of posterity, I will echo what has already been said by mypantalones regarding Piombo’s fit: SIZE UP. As a label with serious ‘fashion’ credentials Piombo can be quite slim and short. 
Thanks to Japanese menswear publications like Free & Easy, I also have an interest in white that has exploded into full on fetishism. I decided therefore to wear the Piombo DB with my white cotton trousers from Band of Outsiders. Again, these are incredibly slim and the bunching in my knee as the pants taper is evidence to that fact. But you could easily substitute these with something with a straight leg opening and flat front (Ambrosi anyone?). 
If the navy/mid gray color combination is affectionately termed ‘security guard’ then it stands to reason that navy/white could just as easily be dubbed ‘prep school mariner’. Regardless of its more traditionalist connotations, I’m always incredibly at ease wearing these two colors together. ‘Safe’ color combinations yield payoffs in other areas: say the ability to deploy a suitably rakish pocket square or go for the loudest madder tie. Far from disturbing how good your ensemble looks, such affectations add points of interest to the outfit. They add visual interest to the interplay between navy and white, also helping to offset the ‘preppy’ or ‘trad’ overtones that can often drown such an outfit. 
As for the umbrella: a thoughtful gift, borne of utilitarian necessity, begs appreciation. That and I owe it to my girlfriend to more often use the things she buys me in public, good taste loves (though it might not necessarily need) an audience. 
Piombo double breasted jacket (6 x 2)
Kamakura oxford (spread collar) 
Christian Kimber ‘Melbourne’ pocket square
Drakes x The Armoury ink grenadine (tied w/ a reverse 4-in-hand..easily my favorite tie)
Band Of Outsiders cotton chinos 
Meermin austerity brogue on museum calf (MTO) 
Garrett Leight California Optical sunglasses
Lifestudio umbrella
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 12-03-2014STYLETERNITY
OOTD 12-10-2013
As I edge toward the end of my initial brush with tertiary study its important to stay active in the blogosphere. Just as cramming and daily morning coffee have become a routinized part of my life, so too has musing on well made things and the intersection between fashion and style. I haven’t delivered an outfit post for over 3 months now, and it is with this imbalance in mind that me and master Jeffrey set out to get back into a healthy content making routine. 
I recently managed to extract from Yoox a - relatively - inexpensive Piombo sportcoat. I can’t believe its taken me this long to supplement my wardrobe with such an essential, but in the midst of all my seasonal outerwear fervor priorities fell by the wayside. The navy blazer, in its various iterations, has long been a part of every #menswear subset. Here in Australia, its doubly important to find such an essential in the appropriate material. Piombo makes this incredibly comfortable double breasted version, in washed cotton twill suited to the temperate climate that permeates our everyday lives. Its no surprise that their take embodies the relaxed aesthetic Southern Italians are now (in)famous for but it is exactly this casualness that make it suitable for just about any occasion (I even paired it with sweatpants on one occasion and was no worse for wear). In the interest of posterity, I will echo what has already been said by mypantalones regarding Piombo’s fit: SIZE UP. As a label with serious ‘fashion’ credentials Piombo can be quite slim and short. 
Thanks to Japanese menswear publications like Free & Easy, I also have an interest in white that has exploded into full on fetishism. I decided therefore to wear the Piombo DB with my white cotton trousers from Band of Outsiders. Again, these are incredibly slim and the bunching in my knee as the pants taper is evidence to that fact. But you could easily substitute these with something with a straight leg opening and flat front (Ambrosi anyone?). 
If the navy/mid gray color combination is affectionately termed ‘security guard’ then it stands to reason that navy/white could just as easily be dubbed ‘prep school mariner’. Regardless of its more traditionalist connotations, I’m always incredibly at ease wearing these two colors together. ‘Safe’ color combinations yield payoffs in other areas: say the ability to deploy a suitably rakish pocket square or go for the loudest madder tie. Far from disturbing how good your ensemble looks, such affectations add points of interest to the outfit. They add visual interest to the interplay between navy and white, also helping to offset the ‘preppy’ or ‘trad’ overtones that can often drown such an outfit. 
As for the umbrella: a thoughtful gift, borne of utilitarian necessity, begs appreciation. That and I owe it to my girlfriend to more often use the things she buys me in public, good taste loves (though it might not necessarily need) an audience. 
Piombo double breasted jacket (6 x 2)
Kamakura oxford (spread collar) 
Christian Kimber ‘Melbourne’ pocket square
Drakes x The Armoury ink grenadine (tied w/ a reverse 4-in-hand..easily my favorite tie)
Band Of Outsiders cotton chinos 
Meermin austerity brogue on museum calf (MTO) 
Garrett Leight California Optical sunglasses
Lifestudio umbrella
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 12-03-2014STYLETERNITY
OOTD 12-10-2013
As I edge toward the end of my initial brush with tertiary study its important to stay active in the blogosphere. Just as cramming and daily morning coffee have become a routinized part of my life, so too has musing on well made things and the intersection between fashion and style. I haven’t delivered an outfit post for over 3 months now, and it is with this imbalance in mind that me and master Jeffrey set out to get back into a healthy content making routine. 
I recently managed to extract from Yoox a - relatively - inexpensive Piombo sportcoat. I can’t believe its taken me this long to supplement my wardrobe with such an essential, but in the midst of all my seasonal outerwear fervor priorities fell by the wayside. The navy blazer, in its various iterations, has long been a part of every #menswear subset. Here in Australia, its doubly important to find such an essential in the appropriate material. Piombo makes this incredibly comfortable double breasted version, in washed cotton twill suited to the temperate climate that permeates our everyday lives. Its no surprise that their take embodies the relaxed aesthetic Southern Italians are now (in)famous for but it is exactly this casualness that make it suitable for just about any occasion (I even paired it with sweatpants on one occasion and was no worse for wear). In the interest of posterity, I will echo what has already been said by mypantalones regarding Piombo’s fit: SIZE UP. As a label with serious ‘fashion’ credentials Piombo can be quite slim and short. 
Thanks to Japanese menswear publications like Free & Easy, I also have an interest in white that has exploded into full on fetishism. I decided therefore to wear the Piombo DB with my white cotton trousers from Band of Outsiders. Again, these are incredibly slim and the bunching in my knee as the pants taper is evidence to that fact. But you could easily substitute these with something with a straight leg opening and flat front (Ambrosi anyone?). 
If the navy/mid gray color combination is affectionately termed ‘security guard’ then it stands to reason that navy/white could just as easily be dubbed ‘prep school mariner’. Regardless of its more traditionalist connotations, I’m always incredibly at ease wearing these two colors together. ‘Safe’ color combinations yield payoffs in other areas: say the ability to deploy a suitably rakish pocket square or go for the loudest madder tie. Far from disturbing how good your ensemble looks, such affectations add points of interest to the outfit. They add visual interest to the interplay between navy and white, also helping to offset the ‘preppy’ or ‘trad’ overtones that can often drown such an outfit. 
As for the umbrella: a thoughtful gift, borne of utilitarian necessity, begs appreciation. That and I owe it to my girlfriend to more often use the things she buys me in public, good taste loves (though it might not necessarily need) an audience. 
Piombo double breasted jacket (6 x 2)
Kamakura oxford (spread collar) 
Christian Kimber ‘Melbourne’ pocket square
Drakes x The Armoury ink grenadine (tied w/ a reverse 4-in-hand..easily my favorite tie)
Band Of Outsiders cotton chinos 
Meermin austerity brogue on museum calf (MTO) 
Garrett Leight California Optical sunglasses
Lifestudio umbrella
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 12-03-2014STYLETERNITY
OOTD 12-10-2013
As I edge toward the end of my initial brush with tertiary study its important to stay active in the blogosphere. Just as cramming and daily morning coffee have become a routinized part of my life, so too has musing on well made things and the intersection between fashion and style. I haven’t delivered an outfit post for over 3 months now, and it is with this imbalance in mind that me and master Jeffrey set out to get back into a healthy content making routine. 
I recently managed to extract from Yoox a - relatively - inexpensive Piombo sportcoat. I can’t believe its taken me this long to supplement my wardrobe with such an essential, but in the midst of all my seasonal outerwear fervor priorities fell by the wayside. The navy blazer, in its various iterations, has long been a part of every #menswear subset. Here in Australia, its doubly important to find such an essential in the appropriate material. Piombo makes this incredibly comfortable double breasted version, in washed cotton twill suited to the temperate climate that permeates our everyday lives. Its no surprise that their take embodies the relaxed aesthetic Southern Italians are now (in)famous for but it is exactly this casualness that make it suitable for just about any occasion (I even paired it with sweatpants on one occasion and was no worse for wear). In the interest of posterity, I will echo what has already been said by mypantalones regarding Piombo’s fit: SIZE UP. As a label with serious ‘fashion’ credentials Piombo can be quite slim and short. 
Thanks to Japanese menswear publications like Free & Easy, I also have an interest in white that has exploded into full on fetishism. I decided therefore to wear the Piombo DB with my white cotton trousers from Band of Outsiders. Again, these are incredibly slim and the bunching in my knee as the pants taper is evidence to that fact. But you could easily substitute these with something with a straight leg opening and flat front (Ambrosi anyone?). 
If the navy/mid gray color combination is affectionately termed ‘security guard’ then it stands to reason that navy/white could just as easily be dubbed ‘prep school mariner’. Regardless of its more traditionalist connotations, I’m always incredibly at ease wearing these two colors together. ‘Safe’ color combinations yield payoffs in other areas: say the ability to deploy a suitably rakish pocket square or go for the loudest madder tie. Far from disturbing how good your ensemble looks, such affectations add points of interest to the outfit. They add visual interest to the interplay between navy and white, also helping to offset the ‘preppy’ or ‘trad’ overtones that can often drown such an outfit. 
As for the umbrella: a thoughtful gift, borne of utilitarian necessity, begs appreciation. That and I owe it to my girlfriend to more often use the things she buys me in public, good taste loves (though it might not necessarily need) an audience. 
Piombo double breasted jacket (6 x 2)
Kamakura oxford (spread collar) 
Christian Kimber ‘Melbourne’ pocket square
Drakes x The Armoury ink grenadine (tied w/ a reverse 4-in-hand..easily my favorite tie)
Band Of Outsiders cotton chinos 
Meermin austerity brogue on museum calf (MTO) 
Garrett Leight California Optical sunglasses
Lifestudio umbrella
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 12-03-2014STYLETERNITY

OOTD 12-10-2013

As I edge toward the end of my initial brush with tertiary study its important to stay active in the blogosphere. Just as cramming and daily morning coffee have become a routinized part of my life, so too has musing on well made things and the intersection between fashion and style. I haven’t delivered an outfit post for over 3 months now, and it is with this imbalance in mind that me and master Jeffrey set out to get back into a healthy content making routine. 

I recently managed to extract from Yoox a - relatively - inexpensive Piombo sportcoat. I can’t believe its taken me this long to supplement my wardrobe with such an essential, but in the midst of all my seasonal outerwear fervor priorities fell by the wayside. The navy blazer, in its various iterations, has long been a part of every #menswear subset. Here in Australia, its doubly important to find such an essential in the appropriate material. Piombo makes this incredibly comfortable double breasted version, in washed cotton twill suited to the temperate climate that permeates our everyday lives. Its no surprise that their take embodies the relaxed aesthetic Southern Italians are now (in)famous for but it is exactly this casualness that make it suitable for just about any occasion (I even paired it with sweatpants on one occasion and was no worse for wear). In the interest of posterity, I will echo what has already been said by mypantalones regarding Piombo’s fit: SIZE UP. As a label with serious ‘fashion’ credentials Piombo can be quite slim and short. 

Thanks to Japanese menswear publications like Free & Easy, I also have an interest in white that has exploded into full on fetishism. I decided therefore to wear the Piombo DB with my white cotton trousers from Band of Outsiders. Again, these are incredibly slim and the bunching in my knee as the pants taper is evidence to that fact. But you could easily substitute these with something with a straight leg opening and flat front (Ambrosi anyone?). 

If the navy/mid gray color combination is affectionately termed ‘security guard’ then it stands to reason that navy/white could just as easily be dubbed ‘prep school mariner’. Regardless of its more traditionalist connotations, I’m always incredibly at ease wearing these two colors together. ‘Safe’ color combinations yield payoffs in other areas: say the ability to deploy a suitably rakish pocket square or go for the loudest madder tie. Far from disturbing how good your ensemble looks, such affectations add points of interest to the outfit. They add visual interest to the interplay between navy and white, also helping to offset the ‘preppy’ or ‘trad’ overtones that can often drown such an outfit. 

As for the umbrella: a thoughtful gift, borne of utilitarian necessity, begs appreciation. That and I owe it to my girlfriend to more often use the things she buys me in public, good taste loves (though it might not necessarily need) an audience. 

Piombo double breasted jacket (6 x 2)

Kamakura oxford (spread collar) 

Christian Kimber ‘Melbourne’ pocket square

Drakes x The Armoury ink grenadine (tied w/ a reverse 4-in-hand..easily my favorite tie)

Band Of Outsiders cotton chinos 

Meermin austerity brogue on museum calf (MTO) 

Garrett Leight California Optical sunglasses

Lifestudio umbrella

All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 12-03-2014
STYLETERNITY

Product In Review: Owen & James Popover X OOTD 16-08-2013
Due to the rigours of tertiary study (certified #firstworldproblems lament right there) I have been finding myself so inundated as to have succumbed (almost) completely to reblog culture. In an effort to remedy that I thought I’d do another outfit complete with a mini review of the Owen & James popovers I was so graciously sent by Rob Blythe (of Suit Shop fame).  
While there are myriad historical details regarding the popover that I could address - in a no doubt long winded and obscure diatribe - I shall simply refer you an excellent article on the aforementioned matters by Jake Gallagher of Wax Wane. Remember what I said about reblog culture? Okay, technically this is an example of hyperlink culture but the same reasoning applies. 
Where my loyalties previously once lay with the oxford cloth button down the popover is fast becoming a dear friend and an item that will see heavy rotation in the summer wardrobe. Falling somewhere between a shirt and a polo, these iterations by Owen & James are an excellent staple: not aggressively over styled, durably manufactured and versatile as all hell. 
The shirt itself is woven from strong pliable cotton, with an unfused collar and hand made details. The hand made touches include green stitching on the gussets (a signature of O & J), non-machined button holes and a meticulously measured length so that the shirt may be worn tucked and untucked. Wearing this either way is easy and there’s no ballooning of excess shirt fabric. There are also the obligatory collar stays in the shirt so you can give it more structure, on the occasion you decide to dress your popover up, each to his own. True to its Ivy heritage, the Owen & James version is made exclusively in New England, quality controls are evidently quite strict. 
Because the popover is an East Coast tradition, and more commonly associated with the great dressage of Ivy brats I felt it unnecessary to ‘mahnswear’ the item up. Paired with a simple club blazer - with an updated body close fit courtesy of Scott Sternberg - summer chinos and beat up Superga plimsolls, this is a look that can be peeled back as spring gives way to summer. Its a simple matter of removing one’s sportcoat and untucking your shirt, comfort at its most rewarding. 
A great halfway house between full on sprezz and total sportswear, the O & J popover is the perfect elixir for those suffering a chronic case of shirt based indecision. Look dressed up, without dressing up. 
Band of Outsiders ‘schoolboy’ blazer 
Owen & James ‘Agnelli’ popover 
Drake’s square w/hand rolled edges
Gant Rugger summer chinos (blessed be the Bast-God)
Superga Cotu 2750 (that I bodied at an A$AP Rocky concert) 
Garrett Leight ‘Ashland’ sunglasses
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 26-07-2013STYLETERNITY 
Product In Review: Owen & James Popover X OOTD 16-08-2013
Due to the rigours of tertiary study (certified #firstworldproblems lament right there) I have been finding myself so inundated as to have succumbed (almost) completely to reblog culture. In an effort to remedy that I thought I’d do another outfit complete with a mini review of the Owen & James popovers I was so graciously sent by Rob Blythe (of Suit Shop fame).  
While there are myriad historical details regarding the popover that I could address - in a no doubt long winded and obscure diatribe - I shall simply refer you an excellent article on the aforementioned matters by Jake Gallagher of Wax Wane. Remember what I said about reblog culture? Okay, technically this is an example of hyperlink culture but the same reasoning applies. 
Where my loyalties previously once lay with the oxford cloth button down the popover is fast becoming a dear friend and an item that will see heavy rotation in the summer wardrobe. Falling somewhere between a shirt and a polo, these iterations by Owen & James are an excellent staple: not aggressively over styled, durably manufactured and versatile as all hell. 
The shirt itself is woven from strong pliable cotton, with an unfused collar and hand made details. The hand made touches include green stitching on the gussets (a signature of O & J), non-machined button holes and a meticulously measured length so that the shirt may be worn tucked and untucked. Wearing this either way is easy and there’s no ballooning of excess shirt fabric. There are also the obligatory collar stays in the shirt so you can give it more structure, on the occasion you decide to dress your popover up, each to his own. True to its Ivy heritage, the Owen & James version is made exclusively in New England, quality controls are evidently quite strict. 
Because the popover is an East Coast tradition, and more commonly associated with the great dressage of Ivy brats I felt it unnecessary to ‘mahnswear’ the item up. Paired with a simple club blazer - with an updated body close fit courtesy of Scott Sternberg - summer chinos and beat up Superga plimsolls, this is a look that can be peeled back as spring gives way to summer. Its a simple matter of removing one’s sportcoat and untucking your shirt, comfort at its most rewarding. 
A great halfway house between full on sprezz and total sportswear, the O & J popover is the perfect elixir for those suffering a chronic case of shirt based indecision. Look dressed up, without dressing up. 
Band of Outsiders ‘schoolboy’ blazer 
Owen & James ‘Agnelli’ popover 
Drake’s square w/hand rolled edges
Gant Rugger summer chinos (blessed be the Bast-God)
Superga Cotu 2750 (that I bodied at an A$AP Rocky concert) 
Garrett Leight ‘Ashland’ sunglasses
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 26-07-2013STYLETERNITY 
Product In Review: Owen & James Popover X OOTD 16-08-2013
Due to the rigours of tertiary study (certified #firstworldproblems lament right there) I have been finding myself so inundated as to have succumbed (almost) completely to reblog culture. In an effort to remedy that I thought I’d do another outfit complete with a mini review of the Owen & James popovers I was so graciously sent by Rob Blythe (of Suit Shop fame).  
While there are myriad historical details regarding the popover that I could address - in a no doubt long winded and obscure diatribe - I shall simply refer you an excellent article on the aforementioned matters by Jake Gallagher of Wax Wane. Remember what I said about reblog culture? Okay, technically this is an example of hyperlink culture but the same reasoning applies. 
Where my loyalties previously once lay with the oxford cloth button down the popover is fast becoming a dear friend and an item that will see heavy rotation in the summer wardrobe. Falling somewhere between a shirt and a polo, these iterations by Owen & James are an excellent staple: not aggressively over styled, durably manufactured and versatile as all hell. 
The shirt itself is woven from strong pliable cotton, with an unfused collar and hand made details. The hand made touches include green stitching on the gussets (a signature of O & J), non-machined button holes and a meticulously measured length so that the shirt may be worn tucked and untucked. Wearing this either way is easy and there’s no ballooning of excess shirt fabric. There are also the obligatory collar stays in the shirt so you can give it more structure, on the occasion you decide to dress your popover up, each to his own. True to its Ivy heritage, the Owen & James version is made exclusively in New England, quality controls are evidently quite strict. 
Because the popover is an East Coast tradition, and more commonly associated with the great dressage of Ivy brats I felt it unnecessary to ‘mahnswear’ the item up. Paired with a simple club blazer - with an updated body close fit courtesy of Scott Sternberg - summer chinos and beat up Superga plimsolls, this is a look that can be peeled back as spring gives way to summer. Its a simple matter of removing one’s sportcoat and untucking your shirt, comfort at its most rewarding. 
A great halfway house between full on sprezz and total sportswear, the O & J popover is the perfect elixir for those suffering a chronic case of shirt based indecision. Look dressed up, without dressing up. 
Band of Outsiders ‘schoolboy’ blazer 
Owen & James ‘Agnelli’ popover 
Drake’s square w/hand rolled edges
Gant Rugger summer chinos (blessed be the Bast-God)
Superga Cotu 2750 (that I bodied at an A$AP Rocky concert) 
Garrett Leight ‘Ashland’ sunglasses
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 26-07-2013STYLETERNITY 
Product In Review: Owen & James Popover X OOTD 16-08-2013
Due to the rigours of tertiary study (certified #firstworldproblems lament right there) I have been finding myself so inundated as to have succumbed (almost) completely to reblog culture. In an effort to remedy that I thought I’d do another outfit complete with a mini review of the Owen & James popovers I was so graciously sent by Rob Blythe (of Suit Shop fame).  
While there are myriad historical details regarding the popover that I could address - in a no doubt long winded and obscure diatribe - I shall simply refer you an excellent article on the aforementioned matters by Jake Gallagher of Wax Wane. Remember what I said about reblog culture? Okay, technically this is an example of hyperlink culture but the same reasoning applies. 
Where my loyalties previously once lay with the oxford cloth button down the popover is fast becoming a dear friend and an item that will see heavy rotation in the summer wardrobe. Falling somewhere between a shirt and a polo, these iterations by Owen & James are an excellent staple: not aggressively over styled, durably manufactured and versatile as all hell. 
The shirt itself is woven from strong pliable cotton, with an unfused collar and hand made details. The hand made touches include green stitching on the gussets (a signature of O & J), non-machined button holes and a meticulously measured length so that the shirt may be worn tucked and untucked. Wearing this either way is easy and there’s no ballooning of excess shirt fabric. There are also the obligatory collar stays in the shirt so you can give it more structure, on the occasion you decide to dress your popover up, each to his own. True to its Ivy heritage, the Owen & James version is made exclusively in New England, quality controls are evidently quite strict. 
Because the popover is an East Coast tradition, and more commonly associated with the great dressage of Ivy brats I felt it unnecessary to ‘mahnswear’ the item up. Paired with a simple club blazer - with an updated body close fit courtesy of Scott Sternberg - summer chinos and beat up Superga plimsolls, this is a look that can be peeled back as spring gives way to summer. Its a simple matter of removing one’s sportcoat and untucking your shirt, comfort at its most rewarding. 
A great halfway house between full on sprezz and total sportswear, the O & J popover is the perfect elixir for those suffering a chronic case of shirt based indecision. Look dressed up, without dressing up. 
Band of Outsiders ‘schoolboy’ blazer 
Owen & James ‘Agnelli’ popover 
Drake’s square w/hand rolled edges
Gant Rugger summer chinos (blessed be the Bast-God)
Superga Cotu 2750 (that I bodied at an A$AP Rocky concert) 
Garrett Leight ‘Ashland’ sunglasses
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 26-07-2013STYLETERNITY 

Product In Review: Owen & James Popover X OOTD 16-08-2013

Due to the rigours of tertiary study (certified #firstworldproblems lament right there) I have been finding myself so inundated as to have succumbed (almost) completely to reblog culture. In an effort to remedy that I thought I’d do another outfit complete with a mini review of the Owen & James popovers I was so graciously sent by Rob Blythe (of Suit Shop fame).  

While there are myriad historical details regarding the popover that I could address - in a no doubt long winded and obscure diatribe - I shall simply refer you an excellent article on the aforementioned matters by Jake Gallagher of Wax Wane. Remember what I said about reblog culture? Okay, technically this is an example of hyperlink culture but the same reasoning applies. 

Where my loyalties previously once lay with the oxford cloth button down the popover is fast becoming a dear friend and an item that will see heavy rotation in the summer wardrobe. Falling somewhere between a shirt and a polo, these iterations by Owen & James are an excellent staple: not aggressively over styled, durably manufactured and versatile as all hell. 

The shirt itself is woven from strong pliable cotton, with an unfused collar and hand made details. The hand made touches include green stitching on the gussets (a signature of O & J), non-machined button holes and a meticulously measured length so that the shirt may be worn tucked and untucked. Wearing this either way is easy and there’s no ballooning of excess shirt fabric. There are also the obligatory collar stays in the shirt so you can give it more structure, on the occasion you decide to dress your popover up, each to his own. True to its Ivy heritage, the Owen & James version is made exclusively in New England, quality controls are evidently quite strict. 

Because the popover is an East Coast tradition, and more commonly associated with the great dressage of Ivy brats I felt it unnecessary to ‘mahnswear’ the item up. Paired with a simple club blazer - with an updated body close fit courtesy of Scott Sternberg - summer chinos and beat up Superga plimsolls, this is a look that can be peeled back as spring gives way to summer. Its a simple matter of removing one’s sportcoat and untucking your shirt, comfort at its most rewarding. 

A great halfway house between full on sprezz and total sportswear, the O & J popover is the perfect elixir for those suffering a chronic case of shirt based indecision. Look dressed up, without dressing up. 

Band of Outsiders ‘schoolboy’ blazer 

Owen & James ‘Agnelli’ popover 

Drake’s square w/hand rolled edges

Gant Rugger summer chinos (blessed be the Bast-God)

Superga Cotu 2750 (that I bodied at an A$AP Rocky concert) 

Garrett Leight ‘Ashland’ sunglasses

All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 26-07-2013
STYLETERNITY 

Band Of Outsiders Waffle Sweatshirt

(Source: Four Pins

OOTD 09-04-2013
In between attempting to find a working DDL link for the Mad Men season 6 premier and furiously cramming for my intergovernmental immunities examination Jeffrey and I found time to head to the city. In the course of our other work he took some quickly staged snaps of me as we went about our business.
This part of Australia is finally laying off the whole 'Dante's Inferno' tip and is becoming pleasantly cool. So today I thought I’d share - for your amusement - a very casual lazyboy outfit I donned.
This cold weather kit can be improved with the addition of wide wale cords (my favourite in a forest green - Ovadia & Sons are doing great takes on the corduroy trouser), a large knitted scarf and a ribbed sweater. I really just wanted an excuse to throw on my CP chukkas and Club Monaco gloves to be real though. 
Supreme cotton jersey shirt 
Thrifted plaid hunting vest 
Band of Outsiders cotton chino trousers 
Common Projects chukka boot
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 09-04-2013STYLETERNITY
OOTD 09-04-2013
In between attempting to find a working DDL link for the Mad Men season 6 premier and furiously cramming for my intergovernmental immunities examination Jeffrey and I found time to head to the city. In the course of our other work he took some quickly staged snaps of me as we went about our business.
This part of Australia is finally laying off the whole 'Dante's Inferno' tip and is becoming pleasantly cool. So today I thought I’d share - for your amusement - a very casual lazyboy outfit I donned.
This cold weather kit can be improved with the addition of wide wale cords (my favourite in a forest green - Ovadia & Sons are doing great takes on the corduroy trouser), a large knitted scarf and a ribbed sweater. I really just wanted an excuse to throw on my CP chukkas and Club Monaco gloves to be real though. 
Supreme cotton jersey shirt 
Thrifted plaid hunting vest 
Band of Outsiders cotton chino trousers 
Common Projects chukka boot
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 09-04-2013STYLETERNITY
OOTD 09-04-2013
In between attempting to find a working DDL link for the Mad Men season 6 premier and furiously cramming for my intergovernmental immunities examination Jeffrey and I found time to head to the city. In the course of our other work he took some quickly staged snaps of me as we went about our business.
This part of Australia is finally laying off the whole 'Dante's Inferno' tip and is becoming pleasantly cool. So today I thought I’d share - for your amusement - a very casual lazyboy outfit I donned.
This cold weather kit can be improved with the addition of wide wale cords (my favourite in a forest green - Ovadia & Sons are doing great takes on the corduroy trouser), a large knitted scarf and a ribbed sweater. I really just wanted an excuse to throw on my CP chukkas and Club Monaco gloves to be real though. 
Supreme cotton jersey shirt 
Thrifted plaid hunting vest 
Band of Outsiders cotton chino trousers 
Common Projects chukka boot
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 09-04-2013STYLETERNITY
OOTD 09-04-2013
In between attempting to find a working DDL link for the Mad Men season 6 premier and furiously cramming for my intergovernmental immunities examination Jeffrey and I found time to head to the city. In the course of our other work he took some quickly staged snaps of me as we went about our business.
This part of Australia is finally laying off the whole 'Dante's Inferno' tip and is becoming pleasantly cool. So today I thought I’d share - for your amusement - a very casual lazyboy outfit I donned.
This cold weather kit can be improved with the addition of wide wale cords (my favourite in a forest green - Ovadia & Sons are doing great takes on the corduroy trouser), a large knitted scarf and a ribbed sweater. I really just wanted an excuse to throw on my CP chukkas and Club Monaco gloves to be real though. 
Supreme cotton jersey shirt 
Thrifted plaid hunting vest 
Band of Outsiders cotton chino trousers 
Common Projects chukka boot
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 09-04-2013STYLETERNITY

OOTD 09-04-2013

In between attempting to find a working DDL link for the Mad Men season 6 premier and furiously cramming for my intergovernmental immunities examination Jeffrey and I found time to head to the city. In the course of our other work he took some quickly staged snaps of me as we went about our business.

This part of Australia is finally laying off the whole 'Dante's Inferno' tip and is becoming pleasantly cool. So today I thought I’d share - for your amusement - a very casual lazyboy outfit I donned.

This cold weather kit can be improved with the addition of wide wale cords (my favourite in a forest green - Ovadia & Sons are doing great takes on the corduroy trouser), a large knitted scarf and a ribbed sweater. I really just wanted an excuse to throw on my CP chukkas and Club Monaco gloves to be real though. 

Supreme cotton jersey shirt 

Thrifted plaid hunting vest 

Band of Outsiders cotton chino trousers 

Common Projects chukka boot

All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 09-04-2013
STYLETERNITY

STYLE ABROAD ROUND-UP PT 3. AEGIS MENSWEAR SHANGHAIIts hardly difficult to find a bevy of the world’s great luxury brands in and around one of China’s most populous and economically powerful cities, but Shanghai currently lacks a thoughtfully curated and dynamic local fashion circle which fashion capitals such as New York and London boast in spades (think B Store, Opening Ceremony et cetera).
Project Aegis plugs this substantial gap by providing menswear devotees with a selection of thoughtfully selected brands in an environment that evokes touches of both old Shanghai and contemporary classicism. With labels like Band of Outsiders, rag & bone, Steven Alan and Common Projects, the store immediately sets itself apart with its focus on relaxed and contemporary menswear (with a couple of ‘spanners in the works’ in the form of Norse Projects et cetera). The store also stocks a number of very reliable and understated Shanghainese brands including S2VS (designed by graduates from the Parsons Fashion School), Initial et cetera. However these brands remain high on quality, and lower on price meaning that swagging travellers can sample some of Shanghai’s more low-key local fashion at the highest of quality. 
The experience at Aegis will immediately impress, located on a lonely stretch of road on Fumin Lu (in Shanghai’s old quarter) the entrance is gilded with low hanging trees and cobbled walkways. Upon entry, customers are greeted by fleet footed attendants who (despite a crutch in less than stellar English) know their brands inside and out. The store itself is lit warmly and given ample touches to contribute to its one-of-a-kind experience. Every product is styled on a weekly basis by the residing staff so that the store feels less like a shopfront and more like someone’s library, a backstage wardrobe and an indoor street walk up combined, oh yeah did I mention there’s a secret change room behind the shoe displays? Its as brilliant as it sounds….
STYLETERNITY
STYLE ABROAD ROUND-UP PT 3. AEGIS MENSWEAR SHANGHAIIts hardly difficult to find a bevy of the world’s great luxury brands in and around one of China’s most populous and economically powerful cities, but Shanghai currently lacks a thoughtfully curated and dynamic local fashion circle which fashion capitals such as New York and London boast in spades (think B Store, Opening Ceremony et cetera).
Project Aegis plugs this substantial gap by providing menswear devotees with a selection of thoughtfully selected brands in an environment that evokes touches of both old Shanghai and contemporary classicism. With labels like Band of Outsiders, rag & bone, Steven Alan and Common Projects, the store immediately sets itself apart with its focus on relaxed and contemporary menswear (with a couple of ‘spanners in the works’ in the form of Norse Projects et cetera). The store also stocks a number of very reliable and understated Shanghainese brands including S2VS (designed by graduates from the Parsons Fashion School), Initial et cetera. However these brands remain high on quality, and lower on price meaning that swagging travellers can sample some of Shanghai’s more low-key local fashion at the highest of quality. 
The experience at Aegis will immediately impress, located on a lonely stretch of road on Fumin Lu (in Shanghai’s old quarter) the entrance is gilded with low hanging trees and cobbled walkways. Upon entry, customers are greeted by fleet footed attendants who (despite a crutch in less than stellar English) know their brands inside and out. The store itself is lit warmly and given ample touches to contribute to its one-of-a-kind experience. Every product is styled on a weekly basis by the residing staff so that the store feels less like a shopfront and more like someone’s library, a backstage wardrobe and an indoor street walk up combined, oh yeah did I mention there’s a secret change room behind the shoe displays? Its as brilliant as it sounds….
STYLETERNITY
STYLE ABROAD ROUND-UP PT 3. AEGIS MENSWEAR SHANGHAIIts hardly difficult to find a bevy of the world’s great luxury brands in and around one of China’s most populous and economically powerful cities, but Shanghai currently lacks a thoughtfully curated and dynamic local fashion circle which fashion capitals such as New York and London boast in spades (think B Store, Opening Ceremony et cetera).
Project Aegis plugs this substantial gap by providing menswear devotees with a selection of thoughtfully selected brands in an environment that evokes touches of both old Shanghai and contemporary classicism. With labels like Band of Outsiders, rag & bone, Steven Alan and Common Projects, the store immediately sets itself apart with its focus on relaxed and contemporary menswear (with a couple of ‘spanners in the works’ in the form of Norse Projects et cetera). The store also stocks a number of very reliable and understated Shanghainese brands including S2VS (designed by graduates from the Parsons Fashion School), Initial et cetera. However these brands remain high on quality, and lower on price meaning that swagging travellers can sample some of Shanghai’s more low-key local fashion at the highest of quality. 
The experience at Aegis will immediately impress, located on a lonely stretch of road on Fumin Lu (in Shanghai’s old quarter) the entrance is gilded with low hanging trees and cobbled walkways. Upon entry, customers are greeted by fleet footed attendants who (despite a crutch in less than stellar English) know their brands inside and out. The store itself is lit warmly and given ample touches to contribute to its one-of-a-kind experience. Every product is styled on a weekly basis by the residing staff so that the store feels less like a shopfront and more like someone’s library, a backstage wardrobe and an indoor street walk up combined, oh yeah did I mention there’s a secret change room behind the shoe displays? Its as brilliant as it sounds….
STYLETERNITY
STYLE ABROAD ROUND-UP PT 3. AEGIS MENSWEAR SHANGHAIIts hardly difficult to find a bevy of the world’s great luxury brands in and around one of China’s most populous and economically powerful cities, but Shanghai currently lacks a thoughtfully curated and dynamic local fashion circle which fashion capitals such as New York and London boast in spades (think B Store, Opening Ceremony et cetera).
Project Aegis plugs this substantial gap by providing menswear devotees with a selection of thoughtfully selected brands in an environment that evokes touches of both old Shanghai and contemporary classicism. With labels like Band of Outsiders, rag & bone, Steven Alan and Common Projects, the store immediately sets itself apart with its focus on relaxed and contemporary menswear (with a couple of ‘spanners in the works’ in the form of Norse Projects et cetera). The store also stocks a number of very reliable and understated Shanghainese brands including S2VS (designed by graduates from the Parsons Fashion School), Initial et cetera. However these brands remain high on quality, and lower on price meaning that swagging travellers can sample some of Shanghai’s more low-key local fashion at the highest of quality. 
The experience at Aegis will immediately impress, located on a lonely stretch of road on Fumin Lu (in Shanghai’s old quarter) the entrance is gilded with low hanging trees and cobbled walkways. Upon entry, customers are greeted by fleet footed attendants who (despite a crutch in less than stellar English) know their brands inside and out. The store itself is lit warmly and given ample touches to contribute to its one-of-a-kind experience. Every product is styled on a weekly basis by the residing staff so that the store feels less like a shopfront and more like someone’s library, a backstage wardrobe and an indoor street walk up combined, oh yeah did I mention there’s a secret change room behind the shoe displays? Its as brilliant as it sounds….
STYLETERNITY

STYLE ABROAD ROUND-UP PT 3. AEGIS MENSWEAR SHANGHAI

Its hardly difficult to find a bevy of the world’s great luxury brands in and around one of China’s most populous and economically powerful cities, but Shanghai currently lacks a thoughtfully curated and dynamic local fashion circle which fashion capitals such as New York and London boast in spades (think B Store, Opening Ceremony et cetera).

Project Aegis plugs this substantial gap by providing menswear devotees with a selection of thoughtfully selected brands in an environment that evokes touches of both old Shanghai and contemporary classicism. With labels like Band of Outsiders, rag & bone, Steven Alan and Common Projects, the store immediately sets itself apart with its focus on relaxed and contemporary menswear (with a couple of ‘spanners in the works’ in the form of Norse Projects et cetera). The store also stocks a number of very reliable and understated Shanghainese brands including S2VS (designed by graduates from the Parsons Fashion School), Initial et cetera. However these brands remain high on quality, and lower on price meaning that swagging travellers can sample some of Shanghai’s more low-key local fashion at the highest of quality. 

The experience at Aegis will immediately impress, located on a lonely stretch of road on Fumin Lu (in Shanghai’s old quarter) the entrance is gilded with low hanging trees and cobbled walkways. Upon entry, customers are greeted by fleet footed attendants who (despite a crutch in less than stellar English) know their brands inside and out. The store itself is lit warmly and given ample touches to contribute to its one-of-a-kind experience. Every product is styled on a weekly basis by the residing staff so that the store feels less like a shopfront and more like someone’s library, a backstage wardrobe and an indoor street walk up combined, oh yeah did I mention there’s a secret change room behind the shoe displays? Its as brilliant as it sounds….

STYLETERNITY

OUR PICK OF THE WEEK- BAND OF OUTSIDERS ZIPUP HOODIE

A hooded sweatshirt- alongside good selvedge denim and stubborn loafers- is one of few wardrobe staples that a man can take true pride in breaking in.  As an essential ingredient of comfortable dressing the hoodie can take you from the gym to the cafe with relative ease, and the more you wear it the more character it develops. To this end, this essential piece of attire (informed by the aesthetic and practicality of active-wear) needs to pack a quality punch to survive the rigors of the gym and the street. Styleternity offers a little assistance by suggesting this luxurious zip-up ‘geek chic’ hoodie by Band of Outsiders. 

More than your average sweatshirt, Band Of Outsider’s update on this classic piece of casualwear comes in a speckled pattern in a luxurious cotton texture: perfect for those frosty morning jogs to the gym. A versatile wardrobe staple, this lightly coloured hoodie can be paired with a polo and chinos as easily as shorts and a pair of New Balance 576

Available now from MR PORTER

Styleternity