Woof, swoosh, swish

Its the Lunarglide 6

(Source: Mr Porter)

STYLE | ETERNITY 

Distinctive lasts featuring striking detail, in this case toe medallions

Henders Scheme

Corthay

(Source: GQ Japan)

STYLETERNITY

Diemme 
The hiking boot details on the white court shoe are great, though I’m not as enthusiastic about the addition of vibram to classic silhouettes like the Chelsea.
(Source: A Continuous Lean) 
STYLETERNITY 
Diemme 
The hiking boot details on the white court shoe are great, though I’m not as enthusiastic about the addition of vibram to classic silhouettes like the Chelsea.
(Source: A Continuous Lean) 
STYLETERNITY 
Diemme 
The hiking boot details on the white court shoe are great, though I’m not as enthusiastic about the addition of vibram to classic silhouettes like the Chelsea.
(Source: A Continuous Lean) 
STYLETERNITY 

Diemme 

The hiking boot details on the white court shoe are great, though I’m not as enthusiastic about the addition of vibram to classic silhouettes like the Chelsea.

(Source: A Continuous Lean

STYLETERNITY 

Canon EOS 5D Mark III

OG Stan Smiths

Long live the King 

(Source: GQ Japan)

STYLETERNITY

Quota of Quality Footwear
3 artisans from across the globe, their products worn by 3 distinctive distinguished and deserving clothiers…
Zonkey Boot cordovan at BnTailor 
Carmina at The Armoury HK
Santoni at Rose & Born 
STYLETERNITY
Quota of Quality Footwear
3 artisans from across the globe, their products worn by 3 distinctive distinguished and deserving clothiers…
Zonkey Boot cordovan at BnTailor 
Carmina at The Armoury HK
Santoni at Rose & Born 
STYLETERNITY
Quota of Quality Footwear
3 artisans from across the globe, their products worn by 3 distinctive distinguished and deserving clothiers…
Zonkey Boot cordovan at BnTailor 
Carmina at The Armoury HK
Santoni at Rose & Born 
STYLETERNITY

Quota of Quality Footwear

3 artisans from across the globe, their products worn by 3 distinctive distinguished and deserving clothiers…

Zonkey Boot cordovan at BnTailor 

Carmina at The Armoury HK

Santoni at Rose & Born 

STYLETERNITY

While I - not unlike 99% of the internet equipped #menswear circlejerk - have always appreciated the stylistic leanings of Public School NYC the brand has always existed on my radar for purely inspirational purposes. Their use of leather, tonally darker shades of color and ‘fashion conscious’ fits have combined to make them a brand that would look suitably wasted upon someone like me. Throw in Australia’s unbearably moist air temperatures, and what you have is a recipe for “exhibit (a): expectation, exhibit (b): reality”. That is, except for these here Public School Jordans  sorry, I mean hi-tops, these are pulling me from the realm of ‘inspirational’ into that of fiscal recklessness.
I should note that I’ve never really been a sneaker guy, and that the closest thing I own to dope kicks is a pair of OG Stan Smiths in the navy/white colorway, nothing special. 
In my mind, the color proportions on this sneaker are close to perfect, and the use of waxed laces + ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) soles provides a distinctive look reminiscent of the patina you’d more readily associate with bespoke shoemakers. 
Truly the downsides of buying these are what we’ve come to expect from proportionate luxury sneaker makers (say ‘hello’ Common Projects): namely, the amount of maintenance you’ll need to do on these coupled with a staggering $490 USD cost of admission.
Assuming you’re crazy you can cop these from Kith NYC, but do tag me in your Instagram struggle-cop pictures so I can live vicariously through you. 
Available at Kith NYC
While I - not unlike 99% of the internet equipped #menswear circlejerk - have always appreciated the stylistic leanings of Public School NYC the brand has always existed on my radar for purely inspirational purposes. Their use of leather, tonally darker shades of color and ‘fashion conscious’ fits have combined to make them a brand that would look suitably wasted upon someone like me. Throw in Australia’s unbearably moist air temperatures, and what you have is a recipe for “exhibit (a): expectation, exhibit (b): reality”. That is, except for these here Public School Jordans  sorry, I mean hi-tops, these are pulling me from the realm of ‘inspirational’ into that of fiscal recklessness.
I should note that I’ve never really been a sneaker guy, and that the closest thing I own to dope kicks is a pair of OG Stan Smiths in the navy/white colorway, nothing special. 
In my mind, the color proportions on this sneaker are close to perfect, and the use of waxed laces + ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) soles provides a distinctive look reminiscent of the patina you’d more readily associate with bespoke shoemakers. 
Truly the downsides of buying these are what we’ve come to expect from proportionate luxury sneaker makers (say ‘hello’ Common Projects): namely, the amount of maintenance you’ll need to do on these coupled with a staggering $490 USD cost of admission.
Assuming you’re crazy you can cop these from Kith NYC, but do tag me in your Instagram struggle-cop pictures so I can live vicariously through you. 
Available at Kith NYC

While I - not unlike 99% of the internet equipped #menswear circlejerk - have always appreciated the stylistic leanings of Public School NYC the brand has always existed on my radar for purely inspirational purposes. Their use of leather, tonally darker shades of color and ‘fashion conscious’ fits have combined to make them a brand that would look suitably wasted upon someone like me. Throw in Australia’s unbearably moist air temperatures, and what you have is a recipe for “exhibit (a): expectation, exhibit (b): reality”. That is, except for these here Public School Jordans  sorry, I mean hi-tops, these are pulling me from the realm of ‘inspirational’ into that of fiscal recklessness.

I should note that I’ve never really been a sneaker guy, and that the closest thing I own to dope kicks is a pair of OG Stan Smiths in the navy/white colorway, nothing special. 

In my mind, the color proportions on this sneaker are close to perfect, and the use of waxed laces + ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) soles provides a distinctive look reminiscent of the patina you’d more readily associate with bespoke shoemakers. 

Truly the downsides of buying these are what we’ve come to expect from proportionate luxury sneaker makers (say ‘hello’ Common Projects): namely, the amount of maintenance you’ll need to do on these coupled with a staggering $490 USD cost of admission.

Assuming you’re crazy you can cop these from Kith NYC, but do tag me in your Instagram struggle-cop pictures so I can live vicariously through you. 

Available at Kith NYC

Christian Kimber ‘East Australia Trading Company’ collection + exclusive interview
Fresh from the release of his newest collection (available online) entitled ‘East Australia Trading Company’, I took the time to catch up with Melbourne based designer Christian Kimber for an exclusive interview. 
As a generous bonus, Christian also provided me with previews of the new and handsome styles you can obtain online (or in select Henry Bucks retailers). 
You held your first pop-up event in Melbourne recently, what was local reception to that like?
It was insane really, it was the second event I have had like this in Melbourne - which ended up mostly attracting a great group of dudes who just like menswear and want to chat about it. Menswear in Melbourne is something that is growing, especially with a younger generation of enthusiasts creating new businesses locally. There seems to be a revolution in Australia spear-headed by a handful of well-dressed dudes. The reception has been wonderful so far - Melbournians celebrate local start-ups and I’ve been very lucky so far.
What are some of your must visit destinations in Melbourne?
Melbourne is a beautiful city with some of the best food and coffee in Australia. From the city, it’s a very short drive to the Yarra Valley wineries. I’ve taken up surfing recently so my most memorable times in Australia have been around the Great Ocean Road. Cafe - located in Collingwood – they serve the best coffee and are really close to my office, I know that seems lazy but I would drive there if needed. As far as food goes there’s a great joint called Brother Burger I’ve been to every week for a month, their specialty is self-explanatory. As for Bars, definitely try out Siglo. 
Melbourne has a few killer #menswear temples. Double Monk is a shoe store owned by two good buddies of mine, dudes with considerable skill: one was a brain surgeon; the other a lawyer and I reckon they’ve assembled some of the world’s best footwear in a single place. Sneaker boy are another great joint, and will hopefully be stocking my sneakers sometime in the future. 
The guys at P. Johnson are another must stop for me: Tom and Porter (who run the Melbourne outfit) just get it. Then there’s Henry Bucks – the Australian equivalent of Paul Stuart – who are going through a renovation at the moment, definitely Australia’s oldest and most classical men’s outfitter. 
You’ve been hard at work on the new collection; tell us about some of the new styles you’ve introduced and what the inspiration for this particular run was.
The new collection includes a couple more tassel loafers, some riffs on classic penny loafers (sans eyelets) and new boots. I’m also looking at launching a sneaker range by March next year which I have been developing for a while, that’s particularly exciting since I’ve always been a huge sneakerhead. I’ll also have some sunglasses and bracelets made in LA by Christmas, so there are a lot of things in the pipeline. We’ve been taking things very slowly initially but we’re starting to pick up momentum.  
The inspiration for this collection is the East India Trading Company. I love the idea of the stylish traveling salesman, which is kind of what I felt like when I moved to Australia. The idea of a merchant vessel coming into a town with exotic fabrics, teas etc. which people haven’t before is something I have been interested in for a while. The influence of travel actually extends to our logo, which resembles a colonial goods and cargo seal. 
Do you have any rules or tips that you swear by when it comes to clothing? 
Fit is the most important thing for me, which I was always weird about as a young chap in the UK. Growing up I was obsessed with clothes and shoes, which was hard on my poor mother. It’s also crucial to develop an understanding of your own style, don’t dress to imitate, just because one dude wears bracelets on his ankle that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s going to work for you.  Menswear is undoubtedly something I’m passionate about, but girls are more important. 
If I had to avoid one piece of clothing it’d be white jackets, there’s a great line from Jeeves & Wooster where Stephen Fry assumes the only way a white jacket could make its way into a gentleman’s wardrobe is if “it had been placed there by enemies”. Wear what makes you happy but try not to disappoint Stephen Fry. 
To those unfortunate people not yet in the know how would you describe the Christian Kimber brand? 
Christian Kimber designs casual footwear and accessories with a neoteric twist. Most of my designs are based on classical construction or historic designs. I design things your grandpa would have worn, but pull them into 2013. 
STYLETERNITY
Christian Kimber ‘East Australia Trading Company’ collection + exclusive interview
Fresh from the release of his newest collection (available online) entitled ‘East Australia Trading Company’, I took the time to catch up with Melbourne based designer Christian Kimber for an exclusive interview. 
As a generous bonus, Christian also provided me with previews of the new and handsome styles you can obtain online (or in select Henry Bucks retailers). 
You held your first pop-up event in Melbourne recently, what was local reception to that like?
It was insane really, it was the second event I have had like this in Melbourne - which ended up mostly attracting a great group of dudes who just like menswear and want to chat about it. Menswear in Melbourne is something that is growing, especially with a younger generation of enthusiasts creating new businesses locally. There seems to be a revolution in Australia spear-headed by a handful of well-dressed dudes. The reception has been wonderful so far - Melbournians celebrate local start-ups and I’ve been very lucky so far.
What are some of your must visit destinations in Melbourne?
Melbourne is a beautiful city with some of the best food and coffee in Australia. From the city, it’s a very short drive to the Yarra Valley wineries. I’ve taken up surfing recently so my most memorable times in Australia have been around the Great Ocean Road. Cafe - located in Collingwood – they serve the best coffee and are really close to my office, I know that seems lazy but I would drive there if needed. As far as food goes there’s a great joint called Brother Burger I’ve been to every week for a month, their specialty is self-explanatory. As for Bars, definitely try out Siglo. 
Melbourne has a few killer #menswear temples. Double Monk is a shoe store owned by two good buddies of mine, dudes with considerable skill: one was a brain surgeon; the other a lawyer and I reckon they’ve assembled some of the world’s best footwear in a single place. Sneaker boy are another great joint, and will hopefully be stocking my sneakers sometime in the future. 
The guys at P. Johnson are another must stop for me: Tom and Porter (who run the Melbourne outfit) just get it. Then there’s Henry Bucks – the Australian equivalent of Paul Stuart – who are going through a renovation at the moment, definitely Australia’s oldest and most classical men’s outfitter. 
You’ve been hard at work on the new collection; tell us about some of the new styles you’ve introduced and what the inspiration for this particular run was.
The new collection includes a couple more tassel loafers, some riffs on classic penny loafers (sans eyelets) and new boots. I’m also looking at launching a sneaker range by March next year which I have been developing for a while, that’s particularly exciting since I’ve always been a huge sneakerhead. I’ll also have some sunglasses and bracelets made in LA by Christmas, so there are a lot of things in the pipeline. We’ve been taking things very slowly initially but we’re starting to pick up momentum.  
The inspiration for this collection is the East India Trading Company. I love the idea of the stylish traveling salesman, which is kind of what I felt like when I moved to Australia. The idea of a merchant vessel coming into a town with exotic fabrics, teas etc. which people haven’t before is something I have been interested in for a while. The influence of travel actually extends to our logo, which resembles a colonial goods and cargo seal. 
Do you have any rules or tips that you swear by when it comes to clothing? 
Fit is the most important thing for me, which I was always weird about as a young chap in the UK. Growing up I was obsessed with clothes and shoes, which was hard on my poor mother. It’s also crucial to develop an understanding of your own style, don’t dress to imitate, just because one dude wears bracelets on his ankle that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s going to work for you.  Menswear is undoubtedly something I’m passionate about, but girls are more important. 
If I had to avoid one piece of clothing it’d be white jackets, there’s a great line from Jeeves & Wooster where Stephen Fry assumes the only way a white jacket could make its way into a gentleman’s wardrobe is if “it had been placed there by enemies”. Wear what makes you happy but try not to disappoint Stephen Fry. 
To those unfortunate people not yet in the know how would you describe the Christian Kimber brand? 
Christian Kimber designs casual footwear and accessories with a neoteric twist. Most of my designs are based on classical construction or historic designs. I design things your grandpa would have worn, but pull them into 2013. 
STYLETERNITY
Christian Kimber ‘East Australia Trading Company’ collection + exclusive interview
Fresh from the release of his newest collection (available online) entitled ‘East Australia Trading Company’, I took the time to catch up with Melbourne based designer Christian Kimber for an exclusive interview. 
As a generous bonus, Christian also provided me with previews of the new and handsome styles you can obtain online (or in select Henry Bucks retailers). 
You held your first pop-up event in Melbourne recently, what was local reception to that like?
It was insane really, it was the second event I have had like this in Melbourne - which ended up mostly attracting a great group of dudes who just like menswear and want to chat about it. Menswear in Melbourne is something that is growing, especially with a younger generation of enthusiasts creating new businesses locally. There seems to be a revolution in Australia spear-headed by a handful of well-dressed dudes. The reception has been wonderful so far - Melbournians celebrate local start-ups and I’ve been very lucky so far.
What are some of your must visit destinations in Melbourne?
Melbourne is a beautiful city with some of the best food and coffee in Australia. From the city, it’s a very short drive to the Yarra Valley wineries. I’ve taken up surfing recently so my most memorable times in Australia have been around the Great Ocean Road. Cafe - located in Collingwood – they serve the best coffee and are really close to my office, I know that seems lazy but I would drive there if needed. As far as food goes there’s a great joint called Brother Burger I’ve been to every week for a month, their specialty is self-explanatory. As for Bars, definitely try out Siglo. 
Melbourne has a few killer #menswear temples. Double Monk is a shoe store owned by two good buddies of mine, dudes with considerable skill: one was a brain surgeon; the other a lawyer and I reckon they’ve assembled some of the world’s best footwear in a single place. Sneaker boy are another great joint, and will hopefully be stocking my sneakers sometime in the future. 
The guys at P. Johnson are another must stop for me: Tom and Porter (who run the Melbourne outfit) just get it. Then there’s Henry Bucks – the Australian equivalent of Paul Stuart – who are going through a renovation at the moment, definitely Australia’s oldest and most classical men’s outfitter. 
You’ve been hard at work on the new collection; tell us about some of the new styles you’ve introduced and what the inspiration for this particular run was.
The new collection includes a couple more tassel loafers, some riffs on classic penny loafers (sans eyelets) and new boots. I’m also looking at launching a sneaker range by March next year which I have been developing for a while, that’s particularly exciting since I’ve always been a huge sneakerhead. I’ll also have some sunglasses and bracelets made in LA by Christmas, so there are a lot of things in the pipeline. We’ve been taking things very slowly initially but we’re starting to pick up momentum.  
The inspiration for this collection is the East India Trading Company. I love the idea of the stylish traveling salesman, which is kind of what I felt like when I moved to Australia. The idea of a merchant vessel coming into a town with exotic fabrics, teas etc. which people haven’t before is something I have been interested in for a while. The influence of travel actually extends to our logo, which resembles a colonial goods and cargo seal. 
Do you have any rules or tips that you swear by when it comes to clothing? 
Fit is the most important thing for me, which I was always weird about as a young chap in the UK. Growing up I was obsessed with clothes and shoes, which was hard on my poor mother. It’s also crucial to develop an understanding of your own style, don’t dress to imitate, just because one dude wears bracelets on his ankle that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s going to work for you.  Menswear is undoubtedly something I’m passionate about, but girls are more important. 
If I had to avoid one piece of clothing it’d be white jackets, there’s a great line from Jeeves & Wooster where Stephen Fry assumes the only way a white jacket could make its way into a gentleman’s wardrobe is if “it had been placed there by enemies”. Wear what makes you happy but try not to disappoint Stephen Fry. 
To those unfortunate people not yet in the know how would you describe the Christian Kimber brand? 
Christian Kimber designs casual footwear and accessories with a neoteric twist. Most of my designs are based on classical construction or historic designs. I design things your grandpa would have worn, but pull them into 2013. 
STYLETERNITY

Christian Kimber ‘East Australia Trading Company’ collection + exclusive interview

Fresh from the release of his newest collection (available online) entitled ‘East Australia Trading Company’, I took the time to catch up with Melbourne based designer Christian Kimber for an exclusive interview. 

As a generous bonus, Christian also provided me with previews of the new and handsome styles you can obtain online (or in select Henry Bucks retailers). 

You held your first pop-up event in Melbourne recently, what was local reception to that like?

It was insane really, it was the second event I have had like this in Melbourne - which ended up mostly attracting a great group of dudes who just like menswear and want to chat about it. Menswear in Melbourne is something that is growing, especially with a younger generation of enthusiasts creating new businesses locally. There seems to be a revolution in Australia spear-headed by a handful of well-dressed dudes. The reception has been wonderful so far - Melbournians celebrate local start-ups and I’ve been very lucky so far.

What are some of your must visit destinations in Melbourne?

Melbourne is a beautiful city with some of the best food and coffee in Australia. From the city, it’s a very short drive to the Yarra Valley wineries. I’ve taken up surfing recently so my most memorable times in Australia have been around the Great Ocean Road. Cafe - located in Collingwood – they serve the best coffee and are really close to my office, I know that seems lazy but I would drive there if needed. As far as food goes there’s a great joint called Brother Burger I’ve been to every week for a month, their specialty is self-explanatory. As for Bars, definitely try out Siglo.

Melbourne has a few killer #menswear temples. Double Monk is a shoe store owned by two good buddies of mine, dudes with considerable skill: one was a brain surgeon; the other a lawyer and I reckon they’ve assembled some of the world’s best footwear in a single place. Sneaker boy are another great joint, and will hopefully be stocking my sneakers sometime in the future.

The guys at P. Johnson are another must stop for me: Tom and Porter (who run the Melbourne outfit) just get it. Then there’s Henry Bucks – the Australian equivalent of Paul Stuart – who are going through a renovation at the moment, definitely Australia’s oldest and most classical men’s outfitter.

You’ve been hard at work on the new collection; tell us about some of the new styles you’ve introduced and what the inspiration for this particular run was.

The new collection includes a couple more tassel loafers, some riffs on classic penny loafers (sans eyelets) and new boots. I’m also looking at launching a sneaker range by March next year which I have been developing for a while, that’s particularly exciting since I’ve always been a huge sneakerhead. I’ll also have some sunglasses and bracelets made in LA by Christmas, so there are a lot of things in the pipeline. We’ve been taking things very slowly initially but we’re starting to pick up momentum. 

The inspiration for this collection is the East India Trading Company. I love the idea of the stylish traveling salesman, which is kind of what I felt like when I moved to Australia. The idea of a merchant vessel coming into a town with exotic fabrics, teas etc. which people haven’t before is something I have been interested in for a while. The influence of travel actually extends to our logo, which resembles a colonial goods and cargo seal.

Do you have any rules or tips that you swear by when it comes to clothing? 

Fit is the most important thing for me, which I was always weird about as a young chap in the UK. Growing up I was obsessed with clothes and shoes, which was hard on my poor mother. It’s also crucial to develop an understanding of your own style, don’t dress to imitate, just because one dude wears bracelets on his ankle that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s going to work for you.  Menswear is undoubtedly something I’m passionate about, but girls are more important.

If I had to avoid one piece of clothing it’d be white jackets, there’s a great line from Jeeves & Wooster where Stephen Fry assumes the only way a white jacket could make its way into a gentleman’s wardrobe is if “it had been placed there by enemies”. Wear what makes you happy but try not to disappoint Stephen Fry.

To those unfortunate people not yet in the know how would you describe the Christian Kimber brand? 

Christian Kimber designs casual footwear and accessories with a neoteric twist. Most of my designs are based on classical construction or historic designs. I design things your grandpa would have worn, but pull them into 2013.

STYLETERNITY

Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III

Made to be worn almost exclusively sockless the Feit hand sewn low is an interesting take on the ‘luxury sneaker’ phenomenon. 

Made with the last of an athletic court shoe, the footbed is attached into the sole of the shoe. This produces a sneaker with greater absorption and - ostensibly - comfort. 

The vegetable tanned, minimally pigmented leather is then left to tighten over the last for a 10 day period. Included is a controlled steam release used to insure the shoe takes shape slowly and durably, no short cuts involved. 

For those of you looking for a bang-for-your-buck luxury sneaker, this is a worthy alternative to Common Projects or any of the aspirationally priced pieces coming out of Saint Laurent, Givenchy, fashun fashun etc. It also incorporates a Goodyear welt, further increasing the longevity of what already looks like a versatile and ageless shoe. 

Currently in stock at Feit Direct 

Congrats to Christian on his latest pop-up event and on the release of the new collection. Always heart warming to see a bunch of well dressed guys turn out to support this small - albeit crucial - industry that’s growing in Australia. 
Can’t wait to get my hands on the new releases, that pebbled loafer with the contrasting vamp strap makes me very happy. 
(Source: Acclaim Magazine) 
Congrats to Christian on his latest pop-up event and on the release of the new collection. Always heart warming to see a bunch of well dressed guys turn out to support this small - albeit crucial - industry that’s growing in Australia. 
Can’t wait to get my hands on the new releases, that pebbled loafer with the contrasting vamp strap makes me very happy. 
(Source: Acclaim Magazine) 
Congrats to Christian on his latest pop-up event and on the release of the new collection. Always heart warming to see a bunch of well dressed guys turn out to support this small - albeit crucial - industry that’s growing in Australia. 
Can’t wait to get my hands on the new releases, that pebbled loafer with the contrasting vamp strap makes me very happy. 
(Source: Acclaim Magazine) 
Congrats to Christian on his latest pop-up event and on the release of the new collection. Always heart warming to see a bunch of well dressed guys turn out to support this small - albeit crucial - industry that’s growing in Australia. 
Can’t wait to get my hands on the new releases, that pebbled loafer with the contrasting vamp strap makes me very happy. 
(Source: Acclaim Magazine) 

Congrats to Christian on his latest pop-up event and on the release of the new collection. Always heart warming to see a bunch of well dressed guys turn out to support this small - albeit crucial - industry that’s growing in Australia. 

Can’t wait to get my hands on the new releases, that pebbled loafer with the contrasting vamp strap makes me very happy. 

(Source: Acclaim Magazine

Interesting stacked slipper/loafer by Church’s

Made with a hybrid linen and canvas upper. 

And they even have my size…

Fujifilm FinePix X100

If you’re part of the Australian menswear crew, best be proud.

There’s a skrong footwear movement going on in Melbourne, click through to see what I have to say about one of its up and coming champions: Christian Kimber, over at Four Pins. 

STYLETERNITY 

Alpine wingtip boot in the ‘Barrie’ last by Alden, now $545, complete with Commando sole

(Source: Leather Soul Hawaii)

OUR PICK OF THE WEEK - Saphir Renovateur

Here at Styleternity, I’m all about that long lasting sartorial quality. As somebody caught up in this whole #menswear thing I think we sometimes attach too much importance to the ‘next’ big purchase. The problem with this obsession is that your closet fills up with a whole bunch of stank product that you thought it was an appropriate idea to purchase ‘at the time’ while the things that are heavy in your day to day rotation get worn into the ground without proper maintenance/alteration.

Nowhere is the problem more apparent than footwear: the foundation of any solid kit, fresh footwear sets the scene for a correspondingly great outfit. Unfortunately many of us lack the time and patience to really care for our shoes the way we should, and while Saphir Renovateur will not make a regular and thorough cleaning of your favorite C & J unnecessary its a pretty good temporary fix when you don’t have the time to stomp out a proper shoe shine.

Made with mink oil, the Saphir renovateur is the very very next level version of an all points leather treatment. Throw that ratchet Zanolin Kiwi shit into your nearest incinerator because Saphir is the benchmark when it comes to footwear maintenance. This oil based cleaner re-hydrates and cleans leather while simultaneously giving it a low matte shine. Used alone its a great temporary fix or as part of a routine (with separate polish and buffing) will result in that glass like patina the lads at The Armoury have been on for some time already.

Available at Kent Wang

STYLETERNITY

Product In Review: Meermin Black Calf Doublemonk Straps

image

An irrefutably iconic part of the whole Tumblr #menswear shit storm, the black doublemonk is a shoe that is as versatile as it is infamous. With a polished captoe, rakish straps and quite a unique silhouette I am unashamed to say it was this shoe that drew me into the good life. 

And here 3 years into the game, I’ve finally got my shit together and present you with the latest segment in the ‘Product In Review’ series. This time starring everybody’s favourite shoemaker Meermin Mallorca and their iteration of one of the cornerstones of the crispy gentleman’s wardrobe. 

MORE AFTER THE DROP.

Read More

Alden Chromexcel Plaza Wingtip Boot, featuring a waterlock leather sole and all metal eyelets. 

Source: Leather Soul Hawaii 

STYLETERNITY