Beautiful v-zone combinations courtesy of Men’s Ex JP, that Borrelli is a particularly easy way to bring life to a sober navy chalkstripe/herringbone. 

(Source: Men’s Ex)

STYLETERNITY 

The Tyranny of Fast Fashion (05/12/2013)

A piece that I penned late last December for a publication that shall remain anonymous. Needless to say the initial offering was rejected, so I’ve decided to repost it here blog-side. Although the article makes particular reference to the retail landscape in Brisbane, Australia many of the issues covered can be extrapolated out to any number of global locales. 

Read More

A Special Thank You To All And Here’s To 2014

Over the last 2 days this blog has surpassed something of a small milestone, on a personal level it would be disingenuous of me if I did not admit I am honored by the number of people who voluntarily choose to follow this space.

While my writing on both the Pins and within Tumblr has come to a stop-start over the past weeks (travel is the death of productivity in my case) I will endeavor to remedy this and provide a little content until school starts again in the new year. 

Once again, much gratitude must be sent into the blogosphere for all the love people have shown me over the years.

On a related note, for those so inclined you can follow me through my food and travel lens at styleternity on Instagram. Sometimes - and often frequently - there are also posts about #menswear. 

Happy 2014.

STYLETERNITY 

Spectre & Co New York shirts

We threw an article up on the Pins a little while back (link included at the footer) about newfound shirt start-up Spectre & Co, but I’d like to add some additional less ‘salty’ verbiage to that endorsement of this eminently affordable new shirtmaker. 

As a fully vertically integrated business, the folks over at Spectre & Co keep their costs down by taking a ‘hands on’ approach to manufacturing. Yes, these shirts are made in China, but if you’re the sort of facilely biased arsehole who thinks that makes them unworthy of attention here’s further reading on why you should reconsider, because brands you love clearly have. 

Put aside the fact that even the most expensive style comes in at under $100 USD, and instead divert your attention to the shirts themselves. Made with separately fused collars for a shirt with better ‘stand’ and in over a dozen seasonal styles, these are versatile and affordable staples that go beyond the standard layering-for-work affair. 

More detailed research on the brand also yields the revelation that these shirts are manufactured in Shanghai, with the aid of design personnel who have put in time at famed shirtmaker Ascot Chang. With the slimmed down body and slight taper through the waist, that house’s DNA has transmuted itself into a more modern more accessible brand. 

(Source: Four Pins

STYLETERNITY

A message from Anonymous
Your blog is wonderful and has really gotten me into appreciating menswear. I was always in the "boys are so lucky, they only have about 4 options in the morning" camp, but now i'm really seeing how intricate and beautiful their fashion is as well! Do you have any other menswear blogs that you enjoy or recomend?
A reply from mypantalones

Thanks for the kind words! Much appreciated. 

I have way too many to list, but here are my top 15 on Tumblr:

These people are this list because they have awesome blogs, but they’re also on this list because they’re great dudes. 

Sorry if we’re homies and you don’t see your blog on this list. My bad.

RAPID REBLOGS
- (‘A series where we talk some more about what we decide to reblog’)

I ain’t even about to front with that ‘so nonchalant that I don’t even care’ bullshit: I am honoured to have been mentioned amongst a legion of such veritable #menswear names, and I thank Alex (a.k.a The Yung Troubledour) for his continued support. Many gentlemen have become disillusioned with this phenomena we call ‘mahnswear’ but I remain steadfast in my belief that it is among the most fulfilling experiences in my young adult life. It is through interactions like this, of unwarranted and incalculable generosity, that I have come to respect the things beyond aesthetics that our little slice of the internet has to offer. 

Certain people may remember that I declared Alex’s blog - humorously entitled - The Pantalones one of my favourites in 2013, and I am happy to report that sentiment remains for 2014. Synthesizing design, style and food in a devilishly cool package you owe it to yourself to check out Alex’s blog tout suite (in the event that you haven’t had that pleasure yet). The rest of his list is bang on the money, with appearances ranging from industry professionals to professional cool dudes

STYLETERNITY 

patrickjohnsontailors:

The Design Files 
Feature on Patrick and Tamsin Johnson’s Sydney home.
Swooon… a beautiful sunshine-filled and somewhat envy inducing Sydney apartment for you today!  This beauty belongs to one particularly creative couple – Patrick Johnson of P Johnson Tailors (trending tailor of the moment, I think it would be safe to say?!), and talented interior designer Tamsin Johnson…. Read more

RAPID REBLOGS- (‘A series where we talk some more about what we decide to reblog’)
After my earlier posts - induced by the visual smorgasbord that is Architectural Digest - I thought I’d follow through closer to home with The Design Files’ recent coverage of Patrick and Tasmin Johnson’s newly renovated Sydney home.
Overseen by Patrick’s wife Tasmin (formerly of Meacham Nockles McQualter) this interior overhaul pretty much sums up my idealized version of Australian home design. Use of the Australia’s greatest cultural assets - rich natural light, breathtaking views and coastal accents - make for a very unique space, given further complexity by Mrs Johnson’s eye for one off antique furnishings.
The customized pendant light-plasters in the living room and watermelon stool are just some of the moveables that lend the Johnson’ residence an irreverent energy, and in some way channel Patrick’s office and homebase in Paddington.
STYLETERNITY
patrickjohnsontailors:

The Design Files 
Feature on Patrick and Tamsin Johnson’s Sydney home.
Swooon… a beautiful sunshine-filled and somewhat envy inducing Sydney apartment for you today!  This beauty belongs to one particularly creative couple – Patrick Johnson of P Johnson Tailors (trending tailor of the moment, I think it would be safe to say?!), and talented interior designer Tamsin Johnson…. Read more

RAPID REBLOGS- (‘A series where we talk some more about what we decide to reblog’)
After my earlier posts - induced by the visual smorgasbord that is Architectural Digest - I thought I’d follow through closer to home with The Design Files’ recent coverage of Patrick and Tasmin Johnson’s newly renovated Sydney home.
Overseen by Patrick’s wife Tasmin (formerly of Meacham Nockles McQualter) this interior overhaul pretty much sums up my idealized version of Australian home design. Use of the Australia’s greatest cultural assets - rich natural light, breathtaking views and coastal accents - make for a very unique space, given further complexity by Mrs Johnson’s eye for one off antique furnishings.
The customized pendant light-plasters in the living room and watermelon stool are just some of the moveables that lend the Johnson’ residence an irreverent energy, and in some way channel Patrick’s office and homebase in Paddington.
STYLETERNITY
patrickjohnsontailors:

The Design Files 
Feature on Patrick and Tamsin Johnson’s Sydney home.
Swooon… a beautiful sunshine-filled and somewhat envy inducing Sydney apartment for you today!  This beauty belongs to one particularly creative couple – Patrick Johnson of P Johnson Tailors (trending tailor of the moment, I think it would be safe to say?!), and talented interior designer Tamsin Johnson…. Read more

RAPID REBLOGS- (‘A series where we talk some more about what we decide to reblog’)
After my earlier posts - induced by the visual smorgasbord that is Architectural Digest - I thought I’d follow through closer to home with The Design Files’ recent coverage of Patrick and Tasmin Johnson’s newly renovated Sydney home.
Overseen by Patrick’s wife Tasmin (formerly of Meacham Nockles McQualter) this interior overhaul pretty much sums up my idealized version of Australian home design. Use of the Australia’s greatest cultural assets - rich natural light, breathtaking views and coastal accents - make for a very unique space, given further complexity by Mrs Johnson’s eye for one off antique furnishings.
The customized pendant light-plasters in the living room and watermelon stool are just some of the moveables that lend the Johnson’ residence an irreverent energy, and in some way channel Patrick’s office and homebase in Paddington.
STYLETERNITY

patrickjohnsontailors:

The Design Files 

Feature on Patrick and Tamsin Johnson’s Sydney home.

Swooon… a beautiful sunshine-filled and somewhat envy inducing Sydney apartment for you today!  This beauty belongs to one particularly creative couple – Patrick Johnson of P Johnson Tailors (trending tailor of the moment, I think it would be safe to say?!), and talented interior designer Tamsin Johnson…. Read more

RAPID REBLOGS
- (‘A series where we talk some more about what we decide to reblog’)

After my earlier posts - induced by the visual smorgasbord that is Architectural Digest - I thought I’d follow through closer to home with The Design Files’ recent coverage of Patrick and Tasmin Johnson’s newly renovated Sydney home.

Overseen by Patrick’s wife Tasmin (formerly of Meacham Nockles McQualter) this interior overhaul pretty much sums up my idealized version of Australian home design. Use of the Australia’s greatest cultural assets - rich natural light, breathtaking views and coastal accents - make for a very unique space, given further complexity by Mrs Johnson’s eye for one off antique furnishings.

The customized pendant light-plasters in the living room and watermelon stool are just some of the moveables that lend the Johnson’ residence an irreverent energy, and in some way channel Patrick’s office and homebase in Paddington.

STYLETERNITY

RAPID REBLOGS
- (‘A series where we talk some more about what we decide to reblog’)

Boss man Lassy is on deck with the e-commerce kings MR PORTER to tell you about ‘fashun’ sneakers, the Margiela GAT silhouette and er..Space Jam. The #menswear Illuminati is very real, and they are apparently EVERYWHERE. This is LAS’s beardy face like you’ve never seen it before, fresh off the digital boat so say ‘thank you’ and get into it.

STYLETERNITY

OOTD 07-10-2013
Before I had the pleasure of ever writing for Four Pins, I remember an article penned by Woolfman (Jake and I are onto nickname waves apparently) about the importance of style while nobody is watching.
The essence of this towering literary treatise was about what your usual/any given day outfits say about you, and the image wizard Jeffrey and I went from there when we decided to shoot (sadly) our last round of photos for 2013 before finals kick in. 
One can make the subjective argument that when you go onto campus (ostensibly to study and not to buy really awful overpriced ‘espresso’) people are watching you, that by virtue of your interactions somebody is bound to see you and make an assessment about any number of matters based on how you’re dressed that day. 
For me though, its a matter of comfort. My primary motivation for being on-site in the first place usually involves cramming/furious assignment writing, and consequently the longer I’ve been at university the more I’ve come to appreciate items that convey a more relaxed aesthetic. When the chillier months set in, its all jackets and outerwear, but this being Australia we have precious few opportunities to indulge in the typical fall style of our Italian and North American contemporaries. 
Veering ‘dangerously close to the 3 piece denim tuxedo’ (as a friend of mine would say) this particular outfit - and a number of variations thereof - have formed the basis of my school uniform over the past few days. The weather has officially descended into some sort of hysteria, and most mornings it can get anywhere up to 30 degrees. As a result numerous t-shirts are in order, with my dyed number by Our Legacy featuring heavily in the rotation. It has one of the softest feelings in hand of any tee I’ve owned, and this combined with a high neck line make for a great hot weather basic. 
Having said that, a combination of comfort and low level steez biting have motivated me to try out some of #menswear’s more infamous trends. The cholo style western shirt and technical running sneakers make an appearance, and despite how unimaginatively I executed them they serve their primary function quite well: both are comfortable, hard wearing and provide a level of depth (via layering) usually absent from the wardrobe of most younger Australian dudes during the summer. 
At the end of the day, style is a huge spectrum. While mastery over it is certainly not proportionate to successful attainment of an LLB, doctrate or killer abs, it pays to care about what you wear on your days off. If you’re an undergraduate like me, you really have few reasons to get totally dressed up (just admit that you enjoy it, there’s really no shame) so on days where a more casual hand is required you should cherish those as opportunities to sharpen your sprezz on items other than double monks and untipped grenadines. 
Shades of Grey by Micah Cohen western shirt
Our Legacy sun altered ‘perfect’ tee
A.P.C new standard five pocket ‘denim’ pant (treated for a relaxed and soft feel) 
Nike Free Inneva Wovens (they take a little while to break in, but unlike hardbottoms the pay off is entirely justified)
Randolph Engineering USA aviators
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 07-10-2013STYLETERNITY
OOTD 07-10-2013
Before I had the pleasure of ever writing for Four Pins, I remember an article penned by Woolfman (Jake and I are onto nickname waves apparently) about the importance of style while nobody is watching.
The essence of this towering literary treatise was about what your usual/any given day outfits say about you, and the image wizard Jeffrey and I went from there when we decided to shoot (sadly) our last round of photos for 2013 before finals kick in. 
One can make the subjective argument that when you go onto campus (ostensibly to study and not to buy really awful overpriced ‘espresso’) people are watching you, that by virtue of your interactions somebody is bound to see you and make an assessment about any number of matters based on how you’re dressed that day. 
For me though, its a matter of comfort. My primary motivation for being on-site in the first place usually involves cramming/furious assignment writing, and consequently the longer I’ve been at university the more I’ve come to appreciate items that convey a more relaxed aesthetic. When the chillier months set in, its all jackets and outerwear, but this being Australia we have precious few opportunities to indulge in the typical fall style of our Italian and North American contemporaries. 
Veering ‘dangerously close to the 3 piece denim tuxedo’ (as a friend of mine would say) this particular outfit - and a number of variations thereof - have formed the basis of my school uniform over the past few days. The weather has officially descended into some sort of hysteria, and most mornings it can get anywhere up to 30 degrees. As a result numerous t-shirts are in order, with my dyed number by Our Legacy featuring heavily in the rotation. It has one of the softest feelings in hand of any tee I’ve owned, and this combined with a high neck line make for a great hot weather basic. 
Having said that, a combination of comfort and low level steez biting have motivated me to try out some of #menswear’s more infamous trends. The cholo style western shirt and technical running sneakers make an appearance, and despite how unimaginatively I executed them they serve their primary function quite well: both are comfortable, hard wearing and provide a level of depth (via layering) usually absent from the wardrobe of most younger Australian dudes during the summer. 
At the end of the day, style is a huge spectrum. While mastery over it is certainly not proportionate to successful attainment of an LLB, doctrate or killer abs, it pays to care about what you wear on your days off. If you’re an undergraduate like me, you really have few reasons to get totally dressed up (just admit that you enjoy it, there’s really no shame) so on days where a more casual hand is required you should cherish those as opportunities to sharpen your sprezz on items other than double monks and untipped grenadines. 
Shades of Grey by Micah Cohen western shirt
Our Legacy sun altered ‘perfect’ tee
A.P.C new standard five pocket ‘denim’ pant (treated for a relaxed and soft feel) 
Nike Free Inneva Wovens (they take a little while to break in, but unlike hardbottoms the pay off is entirely justified)
Randolph Engineering USA aviators
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 07-10-2013STYLETERNITY
OOTD 07-10-2013
Before I had the pleasure of ever writing for Four Pins, I remember an article penned by Woolfman (Jake and I are onto nickname waves apparently) about the importance of style while nobody is watching.
The essence of this towering literary treatise was about what your usual/any given day outfits say about you, and the image wizard Jeffrey and I went from there when we decided to shoot (sadly) our last round of photos for 2013 before finals kick in. 
One can make the subjective argument that when you go onto campus (ostensibly to study and not to buy really awful overpriced ‘espresso’) people are watching you, that by virtue of your interactions somebody is bound to see you and make an assessment about any number of matters based on how you’re dressed that day. 
For me though, its a matter of comfort. My primary motivation for being on-site in the first place usually involves cramming/furious assignment writing, and consequently the longer I’ve been at university the more I’ve come to appreciate items that convey a more relaxed aesthetic. When the chillier months set in, its all jackets and outerwear, but this being Australia we have precious few opportunities to indulge in the typical fall style of our Italian and North American contemporaries. 
Veering ‘dangerously close to the 3 piece denim tuxedo’ (as a friend of mine would say) this particular outfit - and a number of variations thereof - have formed the basis of my school uniform over the past few days. The weather has officially descended into some sort of hysteria, and most mornings it can get anywhere up to 30 degrees. As a result numerous t-shirts are in order, with my dyed number by Our Legacy featuring heavily in the rotation. It has one of the softest feelings in hand of any tee I’ve owned, and this combined with a high neck line make for a great hot weather basic. 
Having said that, a combination of comfort and low level steez biting have motivated me to try out some of #menswear’s more infamous trends. The cholo style western shirt and technical running sneakers make an appearance, and despite how unimaginatively I executed them they serve their primary function quite well: both are comfortable, hard wearing and provide a level of depth (via layering) usually absent from the wardrobe of most younger Australian dudes during the summer. 
At the end of the day, style is a huge spectrum. While mastery over it is certainly not proportionate to successful attainment of an LLB, doctrate or killer abs, it pays to care about what you wear on your days off. If you’re an undergraduate like me, you really have few reasons to get totally dressed up (just admit that you enjoy it, there’s really no shame) so on days where a more casual hand is required you should cherish those as opportunities to sharpen your sprezz on items other than double monks and untipped grenadines. 
Shades of Grey by Micah Cohen western shirt
Our Legacy sun altered ‘perfect’ tee
A.P.C new standard five pocket ‘denim’ pant (treated for a relaxed and soft feel) 
Nike Free Inneva Wovens (they take a little while to break in, but unlike hardbottoms the pay off is entirely justified)
Randolph Engineering USA aviators
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 07-10-2013STYLETERNITY
OOTD 07-10-2013
Before I had the pleasure of ever writing for Four Pins, I remember an article penned by Woolfman (Jake and I are onto nickname waves apparently) about the importance of style while nobody is watching.
The essence of this towering literary treatise was about what your usual/any given day outfits say about you, and the image wizard Jeffrey and I went from there when we decided to shoot (sadly) our last round of photos for 2013 before finals kick in. 
One can make the subjective argument that when you go onto campus (ostensibly to study and not to buy really awful overpriced ‘espresso’) people are watching you, that by virtue of your interactions somebody is bound to see you and make an assessment about any number of matters based on how you’re dressed that day. 
For me though, its a matter of comfort. My primary motivation for being on-site in the first place usually involves cramming/furious assignment writing, and consequently the longer I’ve been at university the more I’ve come to appreciate items that convey a more relaxed aesthetic. When the chillier months set in, its all jackets and outerwear, but this being Australia we have precious few opportunities to indulge in the typical fall style of our Italian and North American contemporaries. 
Veering ‘dangerously close to the 3 piece denim tuxedo’ (as a friend of mine would say) this particular outfit - and a number of variations thereof - have formed the basis of my school uniform over the past few days. The weather has officially descended into some sort of hysteria, and most mornings it can get anywhere up to 30 degrees. As a result numerous t-shirts are in order, with my dyed number by Our Legacy featuring heavily in the rotation. It has one of the softest feelings in hand of any tee I’ve owned, and this combined with a high neck line make for a great hot weather basic. 
Having said that, a combination of comfort and low level steez biting have motivated me to try out some of #menswear’s more infamous trends. The cholo style western shirt and technical running sneakers make an appearance, and despite how unimaginatively I executed them they serve their primary function quite well: both are comfortable, hard wearing and provide a level of depth (via layering) usually absent from the wardrobe of most younger Australian dudes during the summer. 
At the end of the day, style is a huge spectrum. While mastery over it is certainly not proportionate to successful attainment of an LLB, doctrate or killer abs, it pays to care about what you wear on your days off. If you’re an undergraduate like me, you really have few reasons to get totally dressed up (just admit that you enjoy it, there’s really no shame) so on days where a more casual hand is required you should cherish those as opportunities to sharpen your sprezz on items other than double monks and untipped grenadines. 
Shades of Grey by Micah Cohen western shirt
Our Legacy sun altered ‘perfect’ tee
A.P.C new standard five pocket ‘denim’ pant (treated for a relaxed and soft feel) 
Nike Free Inneva Wovens (they take a little while to break in, but unlike hardbottoms the pay off is entirely justified)
Randolph Engineering USA aviators
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 07-10-2013STYLETERNITY
OOTD 07-10-2013
Before I had the pleasure of ever writing for Four Pins, I remember an article penned by Woolfman (Jake and I are onto nickname waves apparently) about the importance of style while nobody is watching.
The essence of this towering literary treatise was about what your usual/any given day outfits say about you, and the image wizard Jeffrey and I went from there when we decided to shoot (sadly) our last round of photos for 2013 before finals kick in. 
One can make the subjective argument that when you go onto campus (ostensibly to study and not to buy really awful overpriced ‘espresso’) people are watching you, that by virtue of your interactions somebody is bound to see you and make an assessment about any number of matters based on how you’re dressed that day. 
For me though, its a matter of comfort. My primary motivation for being on-site in the first place usually involves cramming/furious assignment writing, and consequently the longer I’ve been at university the more I’ve come to appreciate items that convey a more relaxed aesthetic. When the chillier months set in, its all jackets and outerwear, but this being Australia we have precious few opportunities to indulge in the typical fall style of our Italian and North American contemporaries. 
Veering ‘dangerously close to the 3 piece denim tuxedo’ (as a friend of mine would say) this particular outfit - and a number of variations thereof - have formed the basis of my school uniform over the past few days. The weather has officially descended into some sort of hysteria, and most mornings it can get anywhere up to 30 degrees. As a result numerous t-shirts are in order, with my dyed number by Our Legacy featuring heavily in the rotation. It has one of the softest feelings in hand of any tee I’ve owned, and this combined with a high neck line make for a great hot weather basic. 
Having said that, a combination of comfort and low level steez biting have motivated me to try out some of #menswear’s more infamous trends. The cholo style western shirt and technical running sneakers make an appearance, and despite how unimaginatively I executed them they serve their primary function quite well: both are comfortable, hard wearing and provide a level of depth (via layering) usually absent from the wardrobe of most younger Australian dudes during the summer. 
At the end of the day, style is a huge spectrum. While mastery over it is certainly not proportionate to successful attainment of an LLB, doctrate or killer abs, it pays to care about what you wear on your days off. If you’re an undergraduate like me, you really have few reasons to get totally dressed up (just admit that you enjoy it, there’s really no shame) so on days where a more casual hand is required you should cherish those as opportunities to sharpen your sprezz on items other than double monks and untipped grenadines. 
Shades of Grey by Micah Cohen western shirt
Our Legacy sun altered ‘perfect’ tee
A.P.C new standard five pocket ‘denim’ pant (treated for a relaxed and soft feel) 
Nike Free Inneva Wovens (they take a little while to break in, but unlike hardbottoms the pay off is entirely justified)
Randolph Engineering USA aviators
All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 07-10-2013STYLETERNITY

OOTD 07-10-2013

Before I had the pleasure of ever writing for Four Pins, I remember an article penned by Woolfman (Jake and I are onto nickname waves apparently) about the importance of style while nobody is watching.

The essence of this towering literary treatise was about what your usual/any given day outfits say about you, and the image wizard Jeffrey and I went from there when we decided to shoot (sadly) our last round of photos for 2013 before finals kick in. 

One can make the subjective argument that when you go onto campus (ostensibly to study and not to buy really awful overpriced ‘espresso’) people are watching you, that by virtue of your interactions somebody is bound to see you and make an assessment about any number of matters based on how you’re dressed that day. 

For me though, its a matter of comfort. My primary motivation for being on-site in the first place usually involves cramming/furious assignment writing, and consequently the longer I’ve been at university the more I’ve come to appreciate items that convey a more relaxed aesthetic. When the chillier months set in, its all jackets and outerwear, but this being Australia we have precious few opportunities to indulge in the typical fall style of our Italian and North American contemporaries. 

Veering ‘dangerously close to the 3 piece denim tuxedo’ (as a friend of mine would say) this particular outfit - and a number of variations thereof - have formed the basis of my school uniform over the past few days. The weather has officially descended into some sort of hysteria, and most mornings it can get anywhere up to 30 degrees. As a result numerous t-shirts are in order, with my dyed number by Our Legacy featuring heavily in the rotation. It has one of the softest feelings in hand of any tee I’ve owned, and this combined with a high neck line make for a great hot weather basic. 

Having said that, a combination of comfort and low level steez biting have motivated me to try out some of #menswear’s more infamous trends. The cholo style western shirt and technical running sneakers make an appearance, and despite how unimaginatively I executed them they serve their primary function quite well: both are comfortable, hard wearing and provide a level of depth (via layering) usually absent from the wardrobe of most younger Australian dudes during the summer. 

At the end of the day, style is a huge spectrum. While mastery over it is certainly not proportionate to successful attainment of an LLB, doctrate or killer abs, it pays to care about what you wear on your days off. If you’re an undergraduate like me, you really have few reasons to get totally dressed up (just admit that you enjoy it, there’s really no shame) so on days where a more casual hand is required you should cherish those as opportunities to sharpen your sprezz on items other than double monks and untipped grenadines. 

Shades of Grey by Micah Cohen western shirt

Our Legacy sun altered ‘perfect’ tee

A.P.C new standard five pocket ‘denim’ pant (treated for a relaxed and soft feel) 

Nike Free Inneva Wovens (they take a little while to break in, but unlike hardbottoms the pay off is entirely justified)

Randolph Engineering USA aviators

All images by Jeffrey Hamilton 07-10-2013
STYLETERNITY

A message from Anonymous
Dear Master of Eternity, What do you make of this? hitchcockpartners.c0m/news/black_t_shirt ....I know you are a fervent supporter of the notion that one does not need oodels of bank to look trendy (hip, cool, wow, SNAZZY!) and I believe this clearly attests to your belief. Thank you.

While I agree with the basic gist of the Hitchcock Partners’ video, it doesn’t really serve to benefit anyone by being hyperbolic. Yes, evidently certain people pay $280 for Prada t-shirts - even if they don’t drape properly - but I guarantee that the majority of these people  do so because they can afford to, price vs. quality for them being a non-issue. The resulting questions become pontifications on responsible expenditure and good taste, and honestly that’s not something I’m willing to comment on. 

Utilizing one item to illustrate brand hysteria is insufficient: if HP really wanted to go for the jugular they’d need to demonstrate this phenomenon over a wide range of different goods. For example, if you were to include brands famed for producing t-shirts (like James Perse California) the reaction again might be substantially different where those tees - admittedly expensive - are concerned. 

Are people going to be able to tell the difference between a ‘leather’ jacket I got at a mall and one manufactured by Schott? Now that’s a whole nother’ kettle. 

STYLETERNITY 

cadeandco:

Ring Jacket, Drake’s, Liverano. 

RAPID REBLOGS- (‘A series where we talk some more about what we decide to reblog’)
Jake from The Armoury has already featured on here a couple of times, but its worth bringing to everyone’s attention (*sigh* again) how well this young man has mastered the art of relaxed and deconstructed Italian dressing. In these images released on Jake’s blog 2 - 3 days ago, he is wearing a combination (in both images) of Ring Jacket suits, Liverano shirts and Drakes tie/pocket square pairings. Both outfits have a very relaxed charm to them, and would work in any number of non-commercial situations (which seems to be where the ‘suit’ is relegated by the wider public). 
Ring Jacket (a smaller Japanese brand stocked outside of its homeland exclusively by The Armoury HK) favor a construction with moderate roping and an unpadded shoulder. It flatters the natural shoulder line and is particularly great for those men who have an already healthy physique. The traditional Neapolitan spalla camicia is also on show, creating the effect of shirt arms on the jacket. The creasing in the forearms is very pleasant and sets a relaxed tone, even for a statement making piece of tailoring like the double breasted. 
Also, of further interest, is Jake’s Liverano shirt. I’m not entirely sure if the same shirt is employed in both images, but the collar is constructed with little to no fusing in a more traditional point style. The formality of the point collar is offset though by an incredibly well executed - and soft looking - collar roll more reminiscent of sport shirts or oxford cloth button downs. 
I’ve always admired the free handedness with which Jake ties his ties, and while this particular style - which is very asymmetrical - might be considered sloppy by members of the Menswear Conservatives Party it has an attractive freeness about it that really helps convey the relaxed tone which permeates the whole outfit. 
Without generalizing, this may be one of the best ‘how to #menswear’ image sets I’ve seen so far this year.
STYLETERNITY
cadeandco:

Ring Jacket, Drake’s, Liverano. 

RAPID REBLOGS- (‘A series where we talk some more about what we decide to reblog’)
Jake from The Armoury has already featured on here a couple of times, but its worth bringing to everyone’s attention (*sigh* again) how well this young man has mastered the art of relaxed and deconstructed Italian dressing. In these images released on Jake’s blog 2 - 3 days ago, he is wearing a combination (in both images) of Ring Jacket suits, Liverano shirts and Drakes tie/pocket square pairings. Both outfits have a very relaxed charm to them, and would work in any number of non-commercial situations (which seems to be where the ‘suit’ is relegated by the wider public). 
Ring Jacket (a smaller Japanese brand stocked outside of its homeland exclusively by The Armoury HK) favor a construction with moderate roping and an unpadded shoulder. It flatters the natural shoulder line and is particularly great for those men who have an already healthy physique. The traditional Neapolitan spalla camicia is also on show, creating the effect of shirt arms on the jacket. The creasing in the forearms is very pleasant and sets a relaxed tone, even for a statement making piece of tailoring like the double breasted. 
Also, of further interest, is Jake’s Liverano shirt. I’m not entirely sure if the same shirt is employed in both images, but the collar is constructed with little to no fusing in a more traditional point style. The formality of the point collar is offset though by an incredibly well executed - and soft looking - collar roll more reminiscent of sport shirts or oxford cloth button downs. 
I’ve always admired the free handedness with which Jake ties his ties, and while this particular style - which is very asymmetrical - might be considered sloppy by members of the Menswear Conservatives Party it has an attractive freeness about it that really helps convey the relaxed tone which permeates the whole outfit. 
Without generalizing, this may be one of the best ‘how to #menswear’ image sets I’ve seen so far this year.
STYLETERNITY

cadeandco:

Ring Jacket, Drake’s, Liverano. 

RAPID REBLOGS
- (‘A series where we talk some more about what we decide to reblog’)

Jake from The Armoury has already featured on here a couple of times, but its worth bringing to everyone’s attention (*sigh* again) how well this young man has mastered the art of relaxed and deconstructed Italian dressing. In these images released on Jake’s blog 2 - 3 days ago, he is wearing a combination (in both images) of Ring Jacket suits, Liverano shirts and Drakes tie/pocket square pairings. Both outfits have a very relaxed charm to them, and would work in any number of non-commercial situations (which seems to be where the ‘suit’ is relegated by the wider public).

Ring Jacket (a smaller Japanese brand stocked outside of its homeland exclusively by The Armoury HK) favor a construction with moderate roping and an unpadded shoulder. It flatters the natural shoulder line and is particularly great for those men who have an already healthy physique. The traditional Neapolitan spalla camicia is also on show, creating the effect of shirt arms on the jacket. The creasing in the forearms is very pleasant and sets a relaxed tone, even for a statement making piece of tailoring like the double breasted.

Also, of further interest, is Jake’s Liverano shirt. I’m not entirely sure if the same shirt is employed in both images, but the collar is constructed with little to no fusing in a more traditional point style. The formality of the point collar is offset though by an incredibly well executed - and soft looking - collar roll more reminiscent of sport shirts or oxford cloth button downs.

I’ve always admired the free handedness with which Jake ties his ties, and while this particular style - which is very asymmetrical - might be considered sloppy by members of the Menswear Conservatives Party it has an attractive freeness about it that really helps convey the relaxed tone which permeates the whole outfit.

Without generalizing, this may be one of the best ‘how to #menswear’ image sets I’ve seen so far this year.

STYLETERNITY

AMI Spring Summer 2014 retrospective Despite one’s initial assumptions, I’ve been writing less and less about fashion week collections since I started on the Pinz. The majority of the collection reviews I conduct are no longer ‘fresh off the presses’ runway stuff and with an almanac of bloggers - each more eloquent than I - who actually get paid to give their opinions, there really isn’t a need for more subjective drivel poisoning the internet. For AMI though, I’ll make an exception and get down to brass tacks, just like the old days (but seriously, don’t ever go through my fucking archive, its embarrassing). 
At present, I only own two pieces (both from FW 2012) by the young French designer, but it would seem to me that Alexandre Mattiussi is hitting a consistent stride. AMI’s brand imagery is already quite strong, conjuring images of the nonchalantly well dressed man. The AMI style has a sort of unfussy and unctuous quality about it that makes the brand’s clothing feel like it exists in the real world, outside the bubble of haute couture and on the backs of real men, each a fleshed out individual. Mattiussi has opted to continue the theme of transportation in his SS 2014 offering, with an emphasis this time round on the sky rather than the ground. These are not the clothes of the movie star jet setting to Cannes, rather they encapsulate a wide array of quietly stylish travellers circa French airports in the 1960’s. 
A number of the collection’s items make repeat appearances, emphasizing the versatility of the sportcoat and trouser separates that pepper this season. Here, Mattiussi envisions a traveller, mixing a limited number of garments he has literally out of his suitcase, breathing new life into his style by mixing old gear in new ways. 
On a personal level, the integral test of good style involves a positive assessment from the everyman. An admission by those not necessarily interested/invested in menswear that a brand’s clothes still look good. Countless people who I have talked to love AMI, men from all walks of life (indeed the many types of men that Mattiussi was influenced by when designing his latest offering) can find some point of attack, whether it be bird prints or smartly tapered dad denim. This figures decisively in my glowing assessment of the brand: almost anybody can pick up an article of AMI clothing and recognise it not as a ‘luxury garment’, ‘a brand’ or ‘fashion’ but simply as relaxed and timeless clothing. Few ‘fashion’ designers are yet to master toeing the line between sincerity and contemporary cool, yet AMI is leaping ahead in this area.
You can peep the entirety of the collection here (including a similarly glowing yet much more succinct review) 
STYLETERNITY
AMI Spring Summer 2014 retrospective Despite one’s initial assumptions, I’ve been writing less and less about fashion week collections since I started on the Pinz. The majority of the collection reviews I conduct are no longer ‘fresh off the presses’ runway stuff and with an almanac of bloggers - each more eloquent than I - who actually get paid to give their opinions, there really isn’t a need for more subjective drivel poisoning the internet. For AMI though, I’ll make an exception and get down to brass tacks, just like the old days (but seriously, don’t ever go through my fucking archive, its embarrassing). 
At present, I only own two pieces (both from FW 2012) by the young French designer, but it would seem to me that Alexandre Mattiussi is hitting a consistent stride. AMI’s brand imagery is already quite strong, conjuring images of the nonchalantly well dressed man. The AMI style has a sort of unfussy and unctuous quality about it that makes the brand’s clothing feel like it exists in the real world, outside the bubble of haute couture and on the backs of real men, each a fleshed out individual. Mattiussi has opted to continue the theme of transportation in his SS 2014 offering, with an emphasis this time round on the sky rather than the ground. These are not the clothes of the movie star jet setting to Cannes, rather they encapsulate a wide array of quietly stylish travellers circa French airports in the 1960’s. 
A number of the collection’s items make repeat appearances, emphasizing the versatility of the sportcoat and trouser separates that pepper this season. Here, Mattiussi envisions a traveller, mixing a limited number of garments he has literally out of his suitcase, breathing new life into his style by mixing old gear in new ways. 
On a personal level, the integral test of good style involves a positive assessment from the everyman. An admission by those not necessarily interested/invested in menswear that a brand’s clothes still look good. Countless people who I have talked to love AMI, men from all walks of life (indeed the many types of men that Mattiussi was influenced by when designing his latest offering) can find some point of attack, whether it be bird prints or smartly tapered dad denim. This figures decisively in my glowing assessment of the brand: almost anybody can pick up an article of AMI clothing and recognise it not as a ‘luxury garment’, ‘a brand’ or ‘fashion’ but simply as relaxed and timeless clothing. Few ‘fashion’ designers are yet to master toeing the line between sincerity and contemporary cool, yet AMI is leaping ahead in this area.
You can peep the entirety of the collection here (including a similarly glowing yet much more succinct review) 
STYLETERNITY
AMI Spring Summer 2014 retrospective Despite one’s initial assumptions, I’ve been writing less and less about fashion week collections since I started on the Pinz. The majority of the collection reviews I conduct are no longer ‘fresh off the presses’ runway stuff and with an almanac of bloggers - each more eloquent than I - who actually get paid to give their opinions, there really isn’t a need for more subjective drivel poisoning the internet. For AMI though, I’ll make an exception and get down to brass tacks, just like the old days (but seriously, don’t ever go through my fucking archive, its embarrassing). 
At present, I only own two pieces (both from FW 2012) by the young French designer, but it would seem to me that Alexandre Mattiussi is hitting a consistent stride. AMI’s brand imagery is already quite strong, conjuring images of the nonchalantly well dressed man. The AMI style has a sort of unfussy and unctuous quality about it that makes the brand’s clothing feel like it exists in the real world, outside the bubble of haute couture and on the backs of real men, each a fleshed out individual. Mattiussi has opted to continue the theme of transportation in his SS 2014 offering, with an emphasis this time round on the sky rather than the ground. These are not the clothes of the movie star jet setting to Cannes, rather they encapsulate a wide array of quietly stylish travellers circa French airports in the 1960’s. 
A number of the collection’s items make repeat appearances, emphasizing the versatility of the sportcoat and trouser separates that pepper this season. Here, Mattiussi envisions a traveller, mixing a limited number of garments he has literally out of his suitcase, breathing new life into his style by mixing old gear in new ways. 
On a personal level, the integral test of good style involves a positive assessment from the everyman. An admission by those not necessarily interested/invested in menswear that a brand’s clothes still look good. Countless people who I have talked to love AMI, men from all walks of life (indeed the many types of men that Mattiussi was influenced by when designing his latest offering) can find some point of attack, whether it be bird prints or smartly tapered dad denim. This figures decisively in my glowing assessment of the brand: almost anybody can pick up an article of AMI clothing and recognise it not as a ‘luxury garment’, ‘a brand’ or ‘fashion’ but simply as relaxed and timeless clothing. Few ‘fashion’ designers are yet to master toeing the line between sincerity and contemporary cool, yet AMI is leaping ahead in this area.
You can peep the entirety of the collection here (including a similarly glowing yet much more succinct review) 
STYLETERNITY
AMI Spring Summer 2014 retrospective Despite one’s initial assumptions, I’ve been writing less and less about fashion week collections since I started on the Pinz. The majority of the collection reviews I conduct are no longer ‘fresh off the presses’ runway stuff and with an almanac of bloggers - each more eloquent than I - who actually get paid to give their opinions, there really isn’t a need for more subjective drivel poisoning the internet. For AMI though, I’ll make an exception and get down to brass tacks, just like the old days (but seriously, don’t ever go through my fucking archive, its embarrassing). 
At present, I only own two pieces (both from FW 2012) by the young French designer, but it would seem to me that Alexandre Mattiussi is hitting a consistent stride. AMI’s brand imagery is already quite strong, conjuring images of the nonchalantly well dressed man. The AMI style has a sort of unfussy and unctuous quality about it that makes the brand’s clothing feel like it exists in the real world, outside the bubble of haute couture and on the backs of real men, each a fleshed out individual. Mattiussi has opted to continue the theme of transportation in his SS 2014 offering, with an emphasis this time round on the sky rather than the ground. These are not the clothes of the movie star jet setting to Cannes, rather they encapsulate a wide array of quietly stylish travellers circa French airports in the 1960’s. 
A number of the collection’s items make repeat appearances, emphasizing the versatility of the sportcoat and trouser separates that pepper this season. Here, Mattiussi envisions a traveller, mixing a limited number of garments he has literally out of his suitcase, breathing new life into his style by mixing old gear in new ways. 
On a personal level, the integral test of good style involves a positive assessment from the everyman. An admission by those not necessarily interested/invested in menswear that a brand’s clothes still look good. Countless people who I have talked to love AMI, men from all walks of life (indeed the many types of men that Mattiussi was influenced by when designing his latest offering) can find some point of attack, whether it be bird prints or smartly tapered dad denim. This figures decisively in my glowing assessment of the brand: almost anybody can pick up an article of AMI clothing and recognise it not as a ‘luxury garment’, ‘a brand’ or ‘fashion’ but simply as relaxed and timeless clothing. Few ‘fashion’ designers are yet to master toeing the line between sincerity and contemporary cool, yet AMI is leaping ahead in this area.
You can peep the entirety of the collection here (including a similarly glowing yet much more succinct review) 
STYLETERNITY
AMI Spring Summer 2014 retrospective Despite one’s initial assumptions, I’ve been writing less and less about fashion week collections since I started on the Pinz. The majority of the collection reviews I conduct are no longer ‘fresh off the presses’ runway stuff and with an almanac of bloggers - each more eloquent than I - who actually get paid to give their opinions, there really isn’t a need for more subjective drivel poisoning the internet. For AMI though, I’ll make an exception and get down to brass tacks, just like the old days (but seriously, don’t ever go through my fucking archive, its embarrassing). 
At present, I only own two pieces (both from FW 2012) by the young French designer, but it would seem to me that Alexandre Mattiussi is hitting a consistent stride. AMI’s brand imagery is already quite strong, conjuring images of the nonchalantly well dressed man. The AMI style has a sort of unfussy and unctuous quality about it that makes the brand’s clothing feel like it exists in the real world, outside the bubble of haute couture and on the backs of real men, each a fleshed out individual. Mattiussi has opted to continue the theme of transportation in his SS 2014 offering, with an emphasis this time round on the sky rather than the ground. These are not the clothes of the movie star jet setting to Cannes, rather they encapsulate a wide array of quietly stylish travellers circa French airports in the 1960’s. 
A number of the collection’s items make repeat appearances, emphasizing the versatility of the sportcoat and trouser separates that pepper this season. Here, Mattiussi envisions a traveller, mixing a limited number of garments he has literally out of his suitcase, breathing new life into his style by mixing old gear in new ways. 
On a personal level, the integral test of good style involves a positive assessment from the everyman. An admission by those not necessarily interested/invested in menswear that a brand’s clothes still look good. Countless people who I have talked to love AMI, men from all walks of life (indeed the many types of men that Mattiussi was influenced by when designing his latest offering) can find some point of attack, whether it be bird prints or smartly tapered dad denim. This figures decisively in my glowing assessment of the brand: almost anybody can pick up an article of AMI clothing and recognise it not as a ‘luxury garment’, ‘a brand’ or ‘fashion’ but simply as relaxed and timeless clothing. Few ‘fashion’ designers are yet to master toeing the line between sincerity and contemporary cool, yet AMI is leaping ahead in this area.
You can peep the entirety of the collection here (including a similarly glowing yet much more succinct review) 
STYLETERNITY
AMI Spring Summer 2014 retrospective Despite one’s initial assumptions, I’ve been writing less and less about fashion week collections since I started on the Pinz. The majority of the collection reviews I conduct are no longer ‘fresh off the presses’ runway stuff and with an almanac of bloggers - each more eloquent than I - who actually get paid to give their opinions, there really isn’t a need for more subjective drivel poisoning the internet. For AMI though, I’ll make an exception and get down to brass tacks, just like the old days (but seriously, don’t ever go through my fucking archive, its embarrassing). 
At present, I only own two pieces (both from FW 2012) by the young French designer, but it would seem to me that Alexandre Mattiussi is hitting a consistent stride. AMI’s brand imagery is already quite strong, conjuring images of the nonchalantly well dressed man. The AMI style has a sort of unfussy and unctuous quality about it that makes the brand’s clothing feel like it exists in the real world, outside the bubble of haute couture and on the backs of real men, each a fleshed out individual. Mattiussi has opted to continue the theme of transportation in his SS 2014 offering, with an emphasis this time round on the sky rather than the ground. These are not the clothes of the movie star jet setting to Cannes, rather they encapsulate a wide array of quietly stylish travellers circa French airports in the 1960’s. 
A number of the collection’s items make repeat appearances, emphasizing the versatility of the sportcoat and trouser separates that pepper this season. Here, Mattiussi envisions a traveller, mixing a limited number of garments he has literally out of his suitcase, breathing new life into his style by mixing old gear in new ways. 
On a personal level, the integral test of good style involves a positive assessment from the everyman. An admission by those not necessarily interested/invested in menswear that a brand’s clothes still look good. Countless people who I have talked to love AMI, men from all walks of life (indeed the many types of men that Mattiussi was influenced by when designing his latest offering) can find some point of attack, whether it be bird prints or smartly tapered dad denim. This figures decisively in my glowing assessment of the brand: almost anybody can pick up an article of AMI clothing and recognise it not as a ‘luxury garment’, ‘a brand’ or ‘fashion’ but simply as relaxed and timeless clothing. Few ‘fashion’ designers are yet to master toeing the line between sincerity and contemporary cool, yet AMI is leaping ahead in this area.
You can peep the entirety of the collection here (including a similarly glowing yet much more succinct review) 
STYLETERNITY

AMI Spring Summer 2014 retrospective 

Despite one’s initial assumptions, I’ve been writing less and less about fashion week collections since I started on the Pinz. The majority of the collection reviews I conduct are no longer ‘fresh off the presses’ runway stuff and with an almanac of bloggers - each more eloquent than I - who actually get paid to give their opinions, there really isn’t a need for more subjective drivel poisoning the internet. For AMI though, I’ll make an exception and get down to brass tacks, just like the old days (but seriously, don’t ever go through my fucking archive, its embarrassing). 

At present, I only own two pieces (both from FW 2012) by the young French designer, but it would seem to me that Alexandre Mattiussi is hitting a consistent stride. AMI’s brand imagery is already quite strong, conjuring images of the nonchalantly well dressed man. The AMI style has a sort of unfussy and unctuous quality about it that makes the brand’s clothing feel like it exists in the real world, outside the bubble of haute couture and on the backs of real men, each a fleshed out individual. Mattiussi has opted to continue the theme of transportation in his SS 2014 offering, with an emphasis this time round on the sky rather than the ground. These are not the clothes of the movie star jet setting to Cannes, rather they encapsulate a wide array of quietly stylish travellers circa French airports in the 1960’s. 

A number of the collection’s items make repeat appearances, emphasizing the versatility of the sportcoat and trouser separates that pepper this season. Here, Mattiussi envisions a traveller, mixing a limited number of garments he has literally out of his suitcase, breathing new life into his style by mixing old gear in new ways. 

On a personal level, the integral test of good style involves a positive assessment from the everyman. An admission by those not necessarily interested/invested in menswear that a brand’s clothes still look good. Countless people who I have talked to love AMI, men from all walks of life (indeed the many types of men that Mattiussi was influenced by when designing his latest offering) can find some point of attack, whether it be bird prints or smartly tapered dad denim. This figures decisively in my glowing assessment of the brand: almost anybody can pick up an article of AMI clothing and recognise it not as a ‘luxury garment’, ‘a brand’ or ‘fashion’ but simply as relaxed and timeless clothing. Few ‘fashion’ designers are yet to master toeing the line between sincerity and contemporary cool, yet AMI is leaping ahead in this area.

You can peep the entirety of the collection here (including a similarly glowing yet much more succinct review) 

STYLETERNITY

The 10 best menswear shops in Australia 
When push comes to shove you gotta pay homage to the #menswear Meccas of the world. Trust me, there’s no shortage of great countries to purchase crisp garments from and when you factor in the hype associated with buying from many of these exotic locales (think North America, Japan and France) your first port of call is unlikely to be Australia. 
We’re famously known for our played out wildlife, friendly immigration policy and drinking before midday but the fact of the matter is that we also have some fucking awesome brick and mortar menswear stores, provided you look hard enough. 
So for my Straya’ side bros and all you well moneyed wannabe influencers, know that I got your back and have provided the definitive list of the 10 best menswear stores down under.
10. Fallow Brisbane
It ain’t Chi-city, but I gotta put some love down for Brisbane, the capital of Australia’s reddest state Queensland. While Brisbane suffers the unfortunate dilemma of not being quite as tapped in to trends as Melbourne and not quite as big as Sydney, it has its own very distinctive niche when it comes to #menswear. Fallow, is a long time institution, located on the 2nd floor of an unassuming walk-up in the city’s nightlife (a.k.a sneak-handjob) district.
The store itself is a nightmarish fusion of local and international Goth Ninja/high fashion type designers (the standout being Silent by Damir Doma) with an emphasis on very drapey very dramatic apparel. While not strictly menswear (they stock Shaman-Goth robes for your auburn haired lady) the store pulls some Union LA type shit with a range of cool curiosities including candles, skull themed accessories and plates worth more than the greasy student food you can afford to put on them.
9. Apartment Brisbane
Located in a quieter part of the city, Apartment is now in its 3rd generation since it originally opened in 2006.  The current store is located in a heritage listed brick and mortar setup and has continued to serve Brisbane with a stable of brands we’re totally unworthy of. It’s the only location in this part of Australia which stocks that coveted White Mountaineering type shit and also is home to the local Carhartt WIP store-in-store. They recently started stocking the Diemme X Carhartt collab, so there’s plenty for heritage nerds and streetwear heads to get excited about.
Apartment lives up to its title with a large and lofty retail space perfect for doing some casual low key money burning. Brothers Nick and Ben Chiu, co-founders of the shop spent a couple years abroad in New York. They honed their taste there so they could come back to Australia and stunt on the bootcut jean and band tee wearing masses with one of the most visually pleasing spaces to buy jawnz in.
8. Dirtbox Brisbane
Located in the rear of an unassuming lame-as-fuck mall in the middle of Brisbane’s very tiny CBD, Dirtbox is a study in the suspension of disbelief. Despite a relatively small layout and its consignment next to mall level mediocrity (think brands like Lee) it has managed to thrive and survive in this locale.  While the store staff is definitely onto the next one with their always on-point apparel, their attitude is down to Earth when it comes to serving customers.
With a grip of brands like Norse Projects, Moscot & Our Legacy this is the equivalent of a mom and pop store for the hypebeast/heritage/streetwear junkie. They were also named one of GQ Australia’s stores of 2013: a feat made even rarer considering Dirtbox is not located in either of Australia’s style capitals. 
7. Someday Store Melbourne
While Someday is not a purely menswear related operation, its stable of brands and total lifestyle approach to product make it a worthy addition to this list. One of the three known locations in which the Australian hypebeast can cop Supreme, the store also stocks a range of luxury shaman garments (Visvim) and thoughtful accoutrements (Original Fake) perfect for young gunz with zero sense of fiscal responsibility.
Moreover, Someday is home to Perks and Mini (P.A.M), the streetwear brainchild of Misha Hollenbach and Shauna T. The label is renowned for its hybridisation of art, utility and fashion and makes some of the realest cosy boy attire I’ve seen this side of the world. It also helps that the P.A.M brand includes a fully fledged men’s and women’s collection in addition to a side of skrong footwear and accessories. Think rustic prints, burnt colours and all that sort of earthy murder.
6. Double Monk Melbourne 
So this list is pretty saturated with streetwear, and a lot of you sprezz monkeys are – no doubt – feeling left out. That’s where Double Monk comes in: as one of the only dedicated artisanal shoe haberdashers in Australia, you can be assured the store is on that CEO/VIP lifestyle trip. In this temple to everything that is Anglo-Italian you’ll find a glut of wealth level footwear including George Cleverley, Crockett & Jones and John Lobb. The store also has its own fully stocked bar: yeah, we’re out here. 
The guys at Double Monk offer footwear customisation, a range of that reparative liquid gold called Saphir and bespoke fittings by appointment. They’ll occasionally host a shoe polishing evening or some sort of menswear get together, making Double Monk less of a store and more of a style movement. While they gear up to join us in the 21st century with e-commerce, peep their very steezy Tumblr.
 5. Incu (Melbourne/Sydney) 
An Australian style institution since 2002, Incu is still going strong a decade on. With stores in both Melbourne and Sydney, and influencer status far beyond the realm of fashunz, Incu is a must visit destination for both local Aussies and discerning overseas shoppers.
I could spend hours getting into the power house of labels that Incu stocks but to do that would be a disservice to the pure joy of exploring their Sydney and Melbourne spaces. Suffice to say, Incu is that rare Australian retailer that nurtures both local and international talent in equal measure, and the result is a stable of brands with something for literally everybody who gives a shit about wearing nice clothes. It’s also worth pointing out that their in-store blog is on the power flex too, with a great mixture of long form articles, cute staff bios and competitions for *gasp* non clothing related prizes (like tickets to concerts at the Sydney motherfucking Opera house).
4. Supply store Sydney 
One of the v rare stores in Australia to stock Supreme (amongst some other household streetwear names), Supply is Mt Rushmore for Australian hypebeasters. With both hands firmly on the trigger, Supply has murked its competition by supplying Sydney’s burgeoning streetwear connoisseurs with some of the best brands in the game. With WTAPS and Nanamica as stand outs, local kids now have a chance at that sweet Japanese steelo we’ve all been hearing so much about.
They also stock those wavy incense burners that Jon Moy is freaking the fuck out over so you know that shit is good. With a great e-commerce front and a very low key physical presence, Supply has built a reputation as one of Sydney’s realest dealers when it comes to streetwear.
3. Chiodo Melbourne 
People who frequently shit on Melbourne’s retail scene need to take a trip to Chiodo, one of the City of Four Season’s greatest triumphs. Located in Melbourne’s heart in an underground walk-in, Chiodo will immediately remind you why being from anywhere else in Australia basically sucks balls.
The whole space is curated with an out of this world taste level, and individual sections of the store frequently are dedicated to rotated brands. The usual array of fashunz insta-cops is available and if CDG, Deemeulemeester and Raf ‘Please Stop Crying’ Simons aren’t your bag there’s also a giant doggie in store that roams around being friendly with customers.  It should also be noted that Chiodo is one of the few physical storefronts that carries Special Edition, and all the very time sensitive fashion parody gear they create.
2. Harrolds (Melbourne/Sydney)
While the majority of Australia’s contemporary menswear scene seems to be riding the streetwear wave (better late than never right) there’s a reason Harrolds clocks it at number 2 on this list. Even getting through the door is an intimidating prospect, as you have to be at least one hundred stacks tall to foot the cost of entry. With wall to wall Kiton, Thom Browne and Saint Laurent on show this is not a store for the faint of heart or the empty of wallet. Designed by Melbourne based Japanese architect Victor Isobe, the Harrolds menswear emporiums are dedicated to providing gentlemen shoppers with the very best that ready to wear clothing has to offer, a myriad of rooms dedicated to clothing for specific lifestyles and occasions (all of them ridiculously wealthy). The customer service is as attentive as you’d expect, and the mixture of classical and directional brands is an indication of the curatorial detail that goes into selecting product.
The crown jewel in the Harrolds dominion however is its association with Tom Ford. Both the Melbourne and Sydney stores house the official Tom Ford menswear boutiques, and are a literal armoury of all things luxe, wealth and baller. Aside from the ready to wear collections and Tom Ford Beauty products available, Harrolds also operates a made to measure service with special guest appearances by Antonio Blazevic, Ford’s master tailor. At upwards of $6000 a piece, you’re encouraged to savour your time in-store.
1. P.Johnson Sydney 
 Located in Paddington, widely considered the steeziest district in Sydney, the original P. Johnson showroom is the epitome of Australia’s contribution to #menswear. While it has a secondary location in Melbourne, nothing beats the original recipe, and when it comes to the subject of tailoring you’ll be hard pressed to find a man as passionate, informed and inspiring as the OG boss don Patrick Johnson. Don’t believe me? Search the P Johnson tag on Tumblr and weep upon the sheer infinite number of notes the name elicits compared to other feeble pretenders.

Patrick’s store embodies the best qualities of the Australian tailoring model: its beginner friendly, flexible, offers a staggering amount of customisation and is genuinely a neat space to set foot in. From the myriad of detail related minutiae that pepper all of his styling, to the many richly coloured Drakes ties that line the store’s walls this is sprezzy menswear in its purest single malt form. Patrick and co work from a number of base models to build your dream suit and despite the glorious luxury of the whole affair he remains one of Australia’s most affordable tailors. P. Johnson nabs the top spot on our list because it is an experience unique to Australia, available only to those who travel to our sandy shark infested shores. Besides, when your product is the subject of praise by Tumblr heavyweights like Ethan Newton and Alessandro Restivo, the rest of us peasants are all but legally obligated to fall in line.  Quit copping those cosy boy/drug dealer type pants, because if you ever want to purchase a made to measure rig it should be from this joint.
STYLETERNITY  
The 10 best menswear shops in Australia 
When push comes to shove you gotta pay homage to the #menswear Meccas of the world. Trust me, there’s no shortage of great countries to purchase crisp garments from and when you factor in the hype associated with buying from many of these exotic locales (think North America, Japan and France) your first port of call is unlikely to be Australia. 
We’re famously known for our played out wildlife, friendly immigration policy and drinking before midday but the fact of the matter is that we also have some fucking awesome brick and mortar menswear stores, provided you look hard enough. 
So for my Straya’ side bros and all you well moneyed wannabe influencers, know that I got your back and have provided the definitive list of the 10 best menswear stores down under.
10. Fallow Brisbane
It ain’t Chi-city, but I gotta put some love down for Brisbane, the capital of Australia’s reddest state Queensland. While Brisbane suffers the unfortunate dilemma of not being quite as tapped in to trends as Melbourne and not quite as big as Sydney, it has its own very distinctive niche when it comes to #menswear. Fallow, is a long time institution, located on the 2nd floor of an unassuming walk-up in the city’s nightlife (a.k.a sneak-handjob) district.
The store itself is a nightmarish fusion of local and international Goth Ninja/high fashion type designers (the standout being Silent by Damir Doma) with an emphasis on very drapey very dramatic apparel. While not strictly menswear (they stock Shaman-Goth robes for your auburn haired lady) the store pulls some Union LA type shit with a range of cool curiosities including candles, skull themed accessories and plates worth more than the greasy student food you can afford to put on them.
9. Apartment Brisbane
Located in a quieter part of the city, Apartment is now in its 3rd generation since it originally opened in 2006.  The current store is located in a heritage listed brick and mortar setup and has continued to serve Brisbane with a stable of brands we’re totally unworthy of. It’s the only location in this part of Australia which stocks that coveted White Mountaineering type shit and also is home to the local Carhartt WIP store-in-store. They recently started stocking the Diemme X Carhartt collab, so there’s plenty for heritage nerds and streetwear heads to get excited about.
Apartment lives up to its title with a large and lofty retail space perfect for doing some casual low key money burning. Brothers Nick and Ben Chiu, co-founders of the shop spent a couple years abroad in New York. They honed their taste there so they could come back to Australia and stunt on the bootcut jean and band tee wearing masses with one of the most visually pleasing spaces to buy jawnz in.
8. Dirtbox Brisbane
Located in the rear of an unassuming lame-as-fuck mall in the middle of Brisbane’s very tiny CBD, Dirtbox is a study in the suspension of disbelief. Despite a relatively small layout and its consignment next to mall level mediocrity (think brands like Lee) it has managed to thrive and survive in this locale.  While the store staff is definitely onto the next one with their always on-point apparel, their attitude is down to Earth when it comes to serving customers.
With a grip of brands like Norse Projects, Moscot & Our Legacy this is the equivalent of a mom and pop store for the hypebeast/heritage/streetwear junkie. They were also named one of GQ Australia’s stores of 2013: a feat made even rarer considering Dirtbox is not located in either of Australia’s style capitals. 
7. Someday Store Melbourne
While Someday is not a purely menswear related operation, its stable of brands and total lifestyle approach to product make it a worthy addition to this list. One of the three known locations in which the Australian hypebeast can cop Supreme, the store also stocks a range of luxury shaman garments (Visvim) and thoughtful accoutrements (Original Fake) perfect for young gunz with zero sense of fiscal responsibility.
Moreover, Someday is home to Perks and Mini (P.A.M), the streetwear brainchild of Misha Hollenbach and Shauna T. The label is renowned for its hybridisation of art, utility and fashion and makes some of the realest cosy boy attire I’ve seen this side of the world. It also helps that the P.A.M brand includes a fully fledged men’s and women’s collection in addition to a side of skrong footwear and accessories. Think rustic prints, burnt colours and all that sort of earthy murder.
6. Double Monk Melbourne 
So this list is pretty saturated with streetwear, and a lot of you sprezz monkeys are – no doubt – feeling left out. That’s where Double Monk comes in: as one of the only dedicated artisanal shoe haberdashers in Australia, you can be assured the store is on that CEO/VIP lifestyle trip. In this temple to everything that is Anglo-Italian you’ll find a glut of wealth level footwear including George Cleverley, Crockett & Jones and John Lobb. The store also has its own fully stocked bar: yeah, we’re out here. 
The guys at Double Monk offer footwear customisation, a range of that reparative liquid gold called Saphir and bespoke fittings by appointment. They’ll occasionally host a shoe polishing evening or some sort of menswear get together, making Double Monk less of a store and more of a style movement. While they gear up to join us in the 21st century with e-commerce, peep their very steezy Tumblr.
 5. Incu (Melbourne/Sydney) 
An Australian style institution since 2002, Incu is still going strong a decade on. With stores in both Melbourne and Sydney, and influencer status far beyond the realm of fashunz, Incu is a must visit destination for both local Aussies and discerning overseas shoppers.
I could spend hours getting into the power house of labels that Incu stocks but to do that would be a disservice to the pure joy of exploring their Sydney and Melbourne spaces. Suffice to say, Incu is that rare Australian retailer that nurtures both local and international talent in equal measure, and the result is a stable of brands with something for literally everybody who gives a shit about wearing nice clothes. It’s also worth pointing out that their in-store blog is on the power flex too, with a great mixture of long form articles, cute staff bios and competitions for *gasp* non clothing related prizes (like tickets to concerts at the Sydney motherfucking Opera house).
4. Supply store Sydney 
One of the v rare stores in Australia to stock Supreme (amongst some other household streetwear names), Supply is Mt Rushmore for Australian hypebeasters. With both hands firmly on the trigger, Supply has murked its competition by supplying Sydney’s burgeoning streetwear connoisseurs with some of the best brands in the game. With WTAPS and Nanamica as stand outs, local kids now have a chance at that sweet Japanese steelo we’ve all been hearing so much about.
They also stock those wavy incense burners that Jon Moy is freaking the fuck out over so you know that shit is good. With a great e-commerce front and a very low key physical presence, Supply has built a reputation as one of Sydney’s realest dealers when it comes to streetwear.
3. Chiodo Melbourne 
People who frequently shit on Melbourne’s retail scene need to take a trip to Chiodo, one of the City of Four Season’s greatest triumphs. Located in Melbourne’s heart in an underground walk-in, Chiodo will immediately remind you why being from anywhere else in Australia basically sucks balls.
The whole space is curated with an out of this world taste level, and individual sections of the store frequently are dedicated to rotated brands. The usual array of fashunz insta-cops is available and if CDG, Deemeulemeester and Raf ‘Please Stop Crying’ Simons aren’t your bag there’s also a giant doggie in store that roams around being friendly with customers.  It should also be noted that Chiodo is one of the few physical storefronts that carries Special Edition, and all the very time sensitive fashion parody gear they create.
2. Harrolds (Melbourne/Sydney)
While the majority of Australia’s contemporary menswear scene seems to be riding the streetwear wave (better late than never right) there’s a reason Harrolds clocks it at number 2 on this list. Even getting through the door is an intimidating prospect, as you have to be at least one hundred stacks tall to foot the cost of entry. With wall to wall Kiton, Thom Browne and Saint Laurent on show this is not a store for the faint of heart or the empty of wallet. Designed by Melbourne based Japanese architect Victor Isobe, the Harrolds menswear emporiums are dedicated to providing gentlemen shoppers with the very best that ready to wear clothing has to offer, a myriad of rooms dedicated to clothing for specific lifestyles and occasions (all of them ridiculously wealthy). The customer service is as attentive as you’d expect, and the mixture of classical and directional brands is an indication of the curatorial detail that goes into selecting product.
The crown jewel in the Harrolds dominion however is its association with Tom Ford. Both the Melbourne and Sydney stores house the official Tom Ford menswear boutiques, and are a literal armoury of all things luxe, wealth and baller. Aside from the ready to wear collections and Tom Ford Beauty products available, Harrolds also operates a made to measure service with special guest appearances by Antonio Blazevic, Ford’s master tailor. At upwards of $6000 a piece, you’re encouraged to savour your time in-store.
1. P.Johnson Sydney 
 Located in Paddington, widely considered the steeziest district in Sydney, the original P. Johnson showroom is the epitome of Australia’s contribution to #menswear. While it has a secondary location in Melbourne, nothing beats the original recipe, and when it comes to the subject of tailoring you’ll be hard pressed to find a man as passionate, informed and inspiring as the OG boss don Patrick Johnson. Don’t believe me? Search the P Johnson tag on Tumblr and weep upon the sheer infinite number of notes the name elicits compared to other feeble pretenders.

Patrick’s store embodies the best qualities of the Australian tailoring model: its beginner friendly, flexible, offers a staggering amount of customisation and is genuinely a neat space to set foot in. From the myriad of detail related minutiae that pepper all of his styling, to the many richly coloured Drakes ties that line the store’s walls this is sprezzy menswear in its purest single malt form. Patrick and co work from a number of base models to build your dream suit and despite the glorious luxury of the whole affair he remains one of Australia’s most affordable tailors. P. Johnson nabs the top spot on our list because it is an experience unique to Australia, available only to those who travel to our sandy shark infested shores. Besides, when your product is the subject of praise by Tumblr heavyweights like Ethan Newton and Alessandro Restivo, the rest of us peasants are all but legally obligated to fall in line.  Quit copping those cosy boy/drug dealer type pants, because if you ever want to purchase a made to measure rig it should be from this joint.
STYLETERNITY  
The 10 best menswear shops in Australia 
When push comes to shove you gotta pay homage to the #menswear Meccas of the world. Trust me, there’s no shortage of great countries to purchase crisp garments from and when you factor in the hype associated with buying from many of these exotic locales (think North America, Japan and France) your first port of call is unlikely to be Australia. 
We’re famously known for our played out wildlife, friendly immigration policy and drinking before midday but the fact of the matter is that we also have some fucking awesome brick and mortar menswear stores, provided you look hard enough. 
So for my Straya’ side bros and all you well moneyed wannabe influencers, know that I got your back and have provided the definitive list of the 10 best menswear stores down under.
10. Fallow Brisbane
It ain’t Chi-city, but I gotta put some love down for Brisbane, the capital of Australia’s reddest state Queensland. While Brisbane suffers the unfortunate dilemma of not being quite as tapped in to trends as Melbourne and not quite as big as Sydney, it has its own very distinctive niche when it comes to #menswear. Fallow, is a long time institution, located on the 2nd floor of an unassuming walk-up in the city’s nightlife (a.k.a sneak-handjob) district.
The store itself is a nightmarish fusion of local and international Goth Ninja/high fashion type designers (the standout being Silent by Damir Doma) with an emphasis on very drapey very dramatic apparel. While not strictly menswear (they stock Shaman-Goth robes for your auburn haired lady) the store pulls some Union LA type shit with a range of cool curiosities including candles, skull themed accessories and plates worth more than the greasy student food you can afford to put on them.
9. Apartment Brisbane
Located in a quieter part of the city, Apartment is now in its 3rd generation since it originally opened in 2006.  The current store is located in a heritage listed brick and mortar setup and has continued to serve Brisbane with a stable of brands we’re totally unworthy of. It’s the only location in this part of Australia which stocks that coveted White Mountaineering type shit and also is home to the local Carhartt WIP store-in-store. They recently started stocking the Diemme X Carhartt collab, so there’s plenty for heritage nerds and streetwear heads to get excited about.
Apartment lives up to its title with a large and lofty retail space perfect for doing some casual low key money burning. Brothers Nick and Ben Chiu, co-founders of the shop spent a couple years abroad in New York. They honed their taste there so they could come back to Australia and stunt on the bootcut jean and band tee wearing masses with one of the most visually pleasing spaces to buy jawnz in.
8. Dirtbox Brisbane
Located in the rear of an unassuming lame-as-fuck mall in the middle of Brisbane’s very tiny CBD, Dirtbox is a study in the suspension of disbelief. Despite a relatively small layout and its consignment next to mall level mediocrity (think brands like Lee) it has managed to thrive and survive in this locale.  While the store staff is definitely onto the next one with their always on-point apparel, their attitude is down to Earth when it comes to serving customers.
With a grip of brands like Norse Projects, Moscot & Our Legacy this is the equivalent of a mom and pop store for the hypebeast/heritage/streetwear junkie. They were also named one of GQ Australia’s stores of 2013: a feat made even rarer considering Dirtbox is not located in either of Australia’s style capitals. 
7. Someday Store Melbourne
While Someday is not a purely menswear related operation, its stable of brands and total lifestyle approach to product make it a worthy addition to this list. One of the three known locations in which the Australian hypebeast can cop Supreme, the store also stocks a range of luxury shaman garments (Visvim) and thoughtful accoutrements (Original Fake) perfect for young gunz with zero sense of fiscal responsibility.
Moreover, Someday is home to Perks and Mini (P.A.M), the streetwear brainchild of Misha Hollenbach and Shauna T. The label is renowned for its hybridisation of art, utility and fashion and makes some of the realest cosy boy attire I’ve seen this side of the world. It also helps that the P.A.M brand includes a fully fledged men’s and women’s collection in addition to a side of skrong footwear and accessories. Think rustic prints, burnt colours and all that sort of earthy murder.
6. Double Monk Melbourne 
So this list is pretty saturated with streetwear, and a lot of you sprezz monkeys are – no doubt – feeling left out. That’s where Double Monk comes in: as one of the only dedicated artisanal shoe haberdashers in Australia, you can be assured the store is on that CEO/VIP lifestyle trip. In this temple to everything that is Anglo-Italian you’ll find a glut of wealth level footwear including George Cleverley, Crockett & Jones and John Lobb. The store also has its own fully stocked bar: yeah, we’re out here. 
The guys at Double Monk offer footwear customisation, a range of that reparative liquid gold called Saphir and bespoke fittings by appointment. They’ll occasionally host a shoe polishing evening or some sort of menswear get together, making Double Monk less of a store and more of a style movement. While they gear up to join us in the 21st century with e-commerce, peep their very steezy Tumblr.
 5. Incu (Melbourne/Sydney) 
An Australian style institution since 2002, Incu is still going strong a decade on. With stores in both Melbourne and Sydney, and influencer status far beyond the realm of fashunz, Incu is a must visit destination for both local Aussies and discerning overseas shoppers.
I could spend hours getting into the power house of labels that Incu stocks but to do that would be a disservice to the pure joy of exploring their Sydney and Melbourne spaces. Suffice to say, Incu is that rare Australian retailer that nurtures both local and international talent in equal measure, and the result is a stable of brands with something for literally everybody who gives a shit about wearing nice clothes. It’s also worth pointing out that their in-store blog is on the power flex too, with a great mixture of long form articles, cute staff bios and competitions for *gasp* non clothing related prizes (like tickets to concerts at the Sydney motherfucking Opera house).
4. Supply store Sydney 
One of the v rare stores in Australia to stock Supreme (amongst some other household streetwear names), Supply is Mt Rushmore for Australian hypebeasters. With both hands firmly on the trigger, Supply has murked its competition by supplying Sydney’s burgeoning streetwear connoisseurs with some of the best brands in the game. With WTAPS and Nanamica as stand outs, local kids now have a chance at that sweet Japanese steelo we’ve all been hearing so much about.
They also stock those wavy incense burners that Jon Moy is freaking the fuck out over so you know that shit is good. With a great e-commerce front and a very low key physical presence, Supply has built a reputation as one of Sydney’s realest dealers when it comes to streetwear.
3. Chiodo Melbourne 
People who frequently shit on Melbourne’s retail scene need to take a trip to Chiodo, one of the City of Four Season’s greatest triumphs. Located in Melbourne’s heart in an underground walk-in, Chiodo will immediately remind you why being from anywhere else in Australia basically sucks balls.
The whole space is curated with an out of this world taste level, and individual sections of the store frequently are dedicated to rotated brands. The usual array of fashunz insta-cops is available and if CDG, Deemeulemeester and Raf ‘Please Stop Crying’ Simons aren’t your bag there’s also a giant doggie in store that roams around being friendly with customers.  It should also be noted that Chiodo is one of the few physical storefronts that carries Special Edition, and all the very time sensitive fashion parody gear they create.
2. Harrolds (Melbourne/Sydney)
While the majority of Australia’s contemporary menswear scene seems to be riding the streetwear wave (better late than never right) there’s a reason Harrolds clocks it at number 2 on this list. Even getting through the door is an intimidating prospect, as you have to be at least one hundred stacks tall to foot the cost of entry. With wall to wall Kiton, Thom Browne and Saint Laurent on show this is not a store for the faint of heart or the empty of wallet. Designed by Melbourne based Japanese architect Victor Isobe, the Harrolds menswear emporiums are dedicated to providing gentlemen shoppers with the very best that ready to wear clothing has to offer, a myriad of rooms dedicated to clothing for specific lifestyles and occasions (all of them ridiculously wealthy). The customer service is as attentive as you’d expect, and the mixture of classical and directional brands is an indication of the curatorial detail that goes into selecting product.
The crown jewel in the Harrolds dominion however is its association with Tom Ford. Both the Melbourne and Sydney stores house the official Tom Ford menswear boutiques, and are a literal armoury of all things luxe, wealth and baller. Aside from the ready to wear collections and Tom Ford Beauty products available, Harrolds also operates a made to measure service with special guest appearances by Antonio Blazevic, Ford’s master tailor. At upwards of $6000 a piece, you’re encouraged to savour your time in-store.
1. P.Johnson Sydney 
 Located in Paddington, widely considered the steeziest district in Sydney, the original P. Johnson showroom is the epitome of Australia’s contribution to #menswear. While it has a secondary location in Melbourne, nothing beats the original recipe, and when it comes to the subject of tailoring you’ll be hard pressed to find a man as passionate, informed and inspiring as the OG boss don Patrick Johnson. Don’t believe me? Search the P Johnson tag on Tumblr and weep upon the sheer infinite number of notes the name elicits compared to other feeble pretenders.

Patrick’s store embodies the best qualities of the Australian tailoring model: its beginner friendly, flexible, offers a staggering amount of customisation and is genuinely a neat space to set foot in. From the myriad of detail related minutiae that pepper all of his styling, to the many richly coloured Drakes ties that line the store’s walls this is sprezzy menswear in its purest single malt form. Patrick and co work from a number of base models to build your dream suit and despite the glorious luxury of the whole affair he remains one of Australia’s most affordable tailors. P. Johnson nabs the top spot on our list because it is an experience unique to Australia, available only to those who travel to our sandy shark infested shores. Besides, when your product is the subject of praise by Tumblr heavyweights like Ethan Newton and Alessandro Restivo, the rest of us peasants are all but legally obligated to fall in line.  Quit copping those cosy boy/drug dealer type pants, because if you ever want to purchase a made to measure rig it should be from this joint.
STYLETERNITY  
The 10 best menswear shops in Australia 
When push comes to shove you gotta pay homage to the #menswear Meccas of the world. Trust me, there’s no shortage of great countries to purchase crisp garments from and when you factor in the hype associated with buying from many of these exotic locales (think North America, Japan and France) your first port of call is unlikely to be Australia. 
We’re famously known for our played out wildlife, friendly immigration policy and drinking before midday but the fact of the matter is that we also have some fucking awesome brick and mortar menswear stores, provided you look hard enough. 
So for my Straya’ side bros and all you well moneyed wannabe influencers, know that I got your back and have provided the definitive list of the 10 best menswear stores down under.
10. Fallow Brisbane
It ain’t Chi-city, but I gotta put some love down for Brisbane, the capital of Australia’s reddest state Queensland. While Brisbane suffers the unfortunate dilemma of not being quite as tapped in to trends as Melbourne and not quite as big as Sydney, it has its own very distinctive niche when it comes to #menswear. Fallow, is a long time institution, located on the 2nd floor of an unassuming walk-up in the city’s nightlife (a.k.a sneak-handjob) district.
The store itself is a nightmarish fusion of local and international Goth Ninja/high fashion type designers (the standout being Silent by Damir Doma) with an emphasis on very drapey very dramatic apparel. While not strictly menswear (they stock Shaman-Goth robes for your auburn haired lady) the store pulls some Union LA type shit with a range of cool curiosities including candles, skull themed accessories and plates worth more than the greasy student food you can afford to put on them.
9. Apartment Brisbane
Located in a quieter part of the city, Apartment is now in its 3rd generation since it originally opened in 2006.  The current store is located in a heritage listed brick and mortar setup and has continued to serve Brisbane with a stable of brands we’re totally unworthy of. It’s the only location in this part of Australia which stocks that coveted White Mountaineering type shit and also is home to the local Carhartt WIP store-in-store. They recently started stocking the Diemme X Carhartt collab, so there’s plenty for heritage nerds and streetwear heads to get excited about.
Apartment lives up to its title with a large and lofty retail space perfect for doing some casual low key money burning. Brothers Nick and Ben Chiu, co-founders of the shop spent a couple years abroad in New York. They honed their taste there so they could come back to Australia and stunt on the bootcut jean and band tee wearing masses with one of the most visually pleasing spaces to buy jawnz in.
8. Dirtbox Brisbane
Located in the rear of an unassuming lame-as-fuck mall in the middle of Brisbane’s very tiny CBD, Dirtbox is a study in the suspension of disbelief. Despite a relatively small layout and its consignment next to mall level mediocrity (think brands like Lee) it has managed to thrive and survive in this locale.  While the store staff is definitely onto the next one with their always on-point apparel, their attitude is down to Earth when it comes to serving customers.
With a grip of brands like Norse Projects, Moscot & Our Legacy this is the equivalent of a mom and pop store for the hypebeast/heritage/streetwear junkie. They were also named one of GQ Australia’s stores of 2013: a feat made even rarer considering Dirtbox is not located in either of Australia’s style capitals. 
7. Someday Store Melbourne
While Someday is not a purely menswear related operation, its stable of brands and total lifestyle approach to product make it a worthy addition to this list. One of the three known locations in which the Australian hypebeast can cop Supreme, the store also stocks a range of luxury shaman garments (Visvim) and thoughtful accoutrements (Original Fake) perfect for young gunz with zero sense of fiscal responsibility.
Moreover, Someday is home to Perks and Mini (P.A.M), the streetwear brainchild of Misha Hollenbach and Shauna T. The label is renowned for its hybridisation of art, utility and fashion and makes some of the realest cosy boy attire I’ve seen this side of the world. It also helps that the P.A.M brand includes a fully fledged men’s and women’s collection in addition to a side of skrong footwear and accessories. Think rustic prints, burnt colours and all that sort of earthy murder.
6. Double Monk Melbourne 
So this list is pretty saturated with streetwear, and a lot of you sprezz monkeys are – no doubt – feeling left out. That’s where Double Monk comes in: as one of the only dedicated artisanal shoe haberdashers in Australia, you can be assured the store is on that CEO/VIP lifestyle trip. In this temple to everything that is Anglo-Italian you’ll find a glut of wealth level footwear including George Cleverley, Crockett & Jones and John Lobb. The store also has its own fully stocked bar: yeah, we’re out here. 
The guys at Double Monk offer footwear customisation, a range of that reparative liquid gold called Saphir and bespoke fittings by appointment. They’ll occasionally host a shoe polishing evening or some sort of menswear get together, making Double Monk less of a store and more of a style movement. While they gear up to join us in the 21st century with e-commerce, peep their very steezy Tumblr.
 5. Incu (Melbourne/Sydney) 
An Australian style institution since 2002, Incu is still going strong a decade on. With stores in both Melbourne and Sydney, and influencer status far beyond the realm of fashunz, Incu is a must visit destination for both local Aussies and discerning overseas shoppers.
I could spend hours getting into the power house of labels that Incu stocks but to do that would be a disservice to the pure joy of exploring their Sydney and Melbourne spaces. Suffice to say, Incu is that rare Australian retailer that nurtures both local and international talent in equal measure, and the result is a stable of brands with something for literally everybody who gives a shit about wearing nice clothes. It’s also worth pointing out that their in-store blog is on the power flex too, with a great mixture of long form articles, cute staff bios and competitions for *gasp* non clothing related prizes (like tickets to concerts at the Sydney motherfucking Opera house).
4. Supply store Sydney 
One of the v rare stores in Australia to stock Supreme (amongst some other household streetwear names), Supply is Mt Rushmore for Australian hypebeasters. With both hands firmly on the trigger, Supply has murked its competition by supplying Sydney’s burgeoning streetwear connoisseurs with some of the best brands in the game. With WTAPS and Nanamica as stand outs, local kids now have a chance at that sweet Japanese steelo we’ve all been hearing so much about.
They also stock those wavy incense burners that Jon Moy is freaking the fuck out over so you know that shit is good. With a great e-commerce front and a very low key physical presence, Supply has built a reputation as one of Sydney’s realest dealers when it comes to streetwear.
3. Chiodo Melbourne 
People who frequently shit on Melbourne’s retail scene need to take a trip to Chiodo, one of the City of Four Season’s greatest triumphs. Located in Melbourne’s heart in an underground walk-in, Chiodo will immediately remind you why being from anywhere else in Australia basically sucks balls.
The whole space is curated with an out of this world taste level, and individual sections of the store frequently are dedicated to rotated brands. The usual array of fashunz insta-cops is available and if CDG, Deemeulemeester and Raf ‘Please Stop Crying’ Simons aren’t your bag there’s also a giant doggie in store that roams around being friendly with customers.  It should also be noted that Chiodo is one of the few physical storefronts that carries Special Edition, and all the very time sensitive fashion parody gear they create.
2. Harrolds (Melbourne/Sydney)
While the majority of Australia’s contemporary menswear scene seems to be riding the streetwear wave (better late than never right) there’s a reason Harrolds clocks it at number 2 on this list. Even getting through the door is an intimidating prospect, as you have to be at least one hundred stacks tall to foot the cost of entry. With wall to wall Kiton, Thom Browne and Saint Laurent on show this is not a store for the faint of heart or the empty of wallet. Designed by Melbourne based Japanese architect Victor Isobe, the Harrolds menswear emporiums are dedicated to providing gentlemen shoppers with the very best that ready to wear clothing has to offer, a myriad of rooms dedicated to clothing for specific lifestyles and occasions (all of them ridiculously wealthy). The customer service is as attentive as you’d expect, and the mixture of classical and directional brands is an indication of the curatorial detail that goes into selecting product.
The crown jewel in the Harrolds dominion however is its association with Tom Ford. Both the Melbourne and Sydney stores house the official Tom Ford menswear boutiques, and are a literal armoury of all things luxe, wealth and baller. Aside from the ready to wear collections and Tom Ford Beauty products available, Harrolds also operates a made to measure service with special guest appearances by Antonio Blazevic, Ford’s master tailor. At upwards of $6000 a piece, you’re encouraged to savour your time in-store.
1. P.Johnson Sydney 
 Located in Paddington, widely considered the steeziest district in Sydney, the original P. Johnson showroom is the epitome of Australia’s contribution to #menswear. While it has a secondary location in Melbourne, nothing beats the original recipe, and when it comes to the subject of tailoring you’ll be hard pressed to find a man as passionate, informed and inspiring as the OG boss don Patrick Johnson. Don’t believe me? Search the P Johnson tag on Tumblr and weep upon the sheer infinite number of notes the name elicits compared to other feeble pretenders.

Patrick’s store embodies the best qualities of the Australian tailoring model: its beginner friendly, flexible, offers a staggering amount of customisation and is genuinely a neat space to set foot in. From the myriad of detail related minutiae that pepper all of his styling, to the many richly coloured Drakes ties that line the store’s walls this is sprezzy menswear in its purest single malt form. Patrick and co work from a number of base models to build your dream suit and despite the glorious luxury of the whole affair he remains one of Australia’s most affordable tailors. P. Johnson nabs the top spot on our list because it is an experience unique to Australia, available only to those who travel to our sandy shark infested shores. Besides, when your product is the subject of praise by Tumblr heavyweights like Ethan Newton and Alessandro Restivo, the rest of us peasants are all but legally obligated to fall in line.  Quit copping those cosy boy/drug dealer type pants, because if you ever want to purchase a made to measure rig it should be from this joint.
STYLETERNITY  
The 10 best menswear shops in Australia 
When push comes to shove you gotta pay homage to the #menswear Meccas of the world. Trust me, there’s no shortage of great countries to purchase crisp garments from and when you factor in the hype associated with buying from many of these exotic locales (think North America, Japan and France) your first port of call is unlikely to be Australia. 
We’re famously known for our played out wildlife, friendly immigration policy and drinking before midday but the fact of the matter is that we also have some fucking awesome brick and mortar menswear stores, provided you look hard enough. 
So for my Straya’ side bros and all you well moneyed wannabe influencers, know that I got your back and have provided the definitive list of the 10 best menswear stores down under.
10. Fallow Brisbane
It ain’t Chi-city, but I gotta put some love down for Brisbane, the capital of Australia’s reddest state Queensland. While Brisbane suffers the unfortunate dilemma of not being quite as tapped in to trends as Melbourne and not quite as big as Sydney, it has its own very distinctive niche when it comes to #menswear. Fallow, is a long time institution, located on the 2nd floor of an unassuming walk-up in the city’s nightlife (a.k.a sneak-handjob) district.
The store itself is a nightmarish fusion of local and international Goth Ninja/high fashion type designers (the standout being Silent by Damir Doma) with an emphasis on very drapey very dramatic apparel. While not strictly menswear (they stock Shaman-Goth robes for your auburn haired lady) the store pulls some Union LA type shit with a range of cool curiosities including candles, skull themed accessories and plates worth more than the greasy student food you can afford to put on them.
9. Apartment Brisbane
Located in a quieter part of the city, Apartment is now in its 3rd generation since it originally opened in 2006.  The current store is located in a heritage listed brick and mortar setup and has continued to serve Brisbane with a stable of brands we’re totally unworthy of. It’s the only location in this part of Australia which stocks that coveted White Mountaineering type shit and also is home to the local Carhartt WIP store-in-store. They recently started stocking the Diemme X Carhartt collab, so there’s plenty for heritage nerds and streetwear heads to get excited about.
Apartment lives up to its title with a large and lofty retail space perfect for doing some casual low key money burning. Brothers Nick and Ben Chiu, co-founders of the shop spent a couple years abroad in New York. They honed their taste there so they could come back to Australia and stunt on the bootcut jean and band tee wearing masses with one of the most visually pleasing spaces to buy jawnz in.
8. Dirtbox Brisbane
Located in the rear of an unassuming lame-as-fuck mall in the middle of Brisbane’s very tiny CBD, Dirtbox is a study in the suspension of disbelief. Despite a relatively small layout and its consignment next to mall level mediocrity (think brands like Lee) it has managed to thrive and survive in this locale.  While the store staff is definitely onto the next one with their always on-point apparel, their attitude is down to Earth when it comes to serving customers.
With a grip of brands like Norse Projects, Moscot & Our Legacy this is the equivalent of a mom and pop store for the hypebeast/heritage/streetwear junkie. They were also named one of GQ Australia’s stores of 2013: a feat made even rarer considering Dirtbox is not located in either of Australia’s style capitals. 
7. Someday Store Melbourne
While Someday is not a purely menswear related operation, its stable of brands and total lifestyle approach to product make it a worthy addition to this list. One of the three known locations in which the Australian hypebeast can cop Supreme, the store also stocks a range of luxury shaman garments (Visvim) and thoughtful accoutrements (Original Fake) perfect for young gunz with zero sense of fiscal responsibility.
Moreover, Someday is home to Perks and Mini (P.A.M), the streetwear brainchild of Misha Hollenbach and Shauna T. The label is renowned for its hybridisation of art, utility and fashion and makes some of the realest cosy boy attire I’ve seen this side of the world. It also helps that the P.A.M brand includes a fully fledged men’s and women’s collection in addition to a side of skrong footwear and accessories. Think rustic prints, burnt colours and all that sort of earthy murder.
6. Double Monk Melbourne 
So this list is pretty saturated with streetwear, and a lot of you sprezz monkeys are – no doubt – feeling left out. That’s where Double Monk comes in: as one of the only dedicated artisanal shoe haberdashers in Australia, you can be assured the store is on that CEO/VIP lifestyle trip. In this temple to everything that is Anglo-Italian you’ll find a glut of wealth level footwear including George Cleverley, Crockett & Jones and John Lobb. The store also has its own fully stocked bar: yeah, we’re out here. 
The guys at Double Monk offer footwear customisation, a range of that reparative liquid gold called Saphir and bespoke fittings by appointment. They’ll occasionally host a shoe polishing evening or some sort of menswear get together, making Double Monk less of a store and more of a style movement. While they gear up to join us in the 21st century with e-commerce, peep their very steezy Tumblr.
 5. Incu (Melbourne/Sydney) 
An Australian style institution since 2002, Incu is still going strong a decade on. With stores in both Melbourne and Sydney, and influencer status far beyond the realm of fashunz, Incu is a must visit destination for both local Aussies and discerning overseas shoppers.
I could spend hours getting into the power house of labels that Incu stocks but to do that would be a disservice to the pure joy of exploring their Sydney and Melbourne spaces. Suffice to say, Incu is that rare Australian retailer that nurtures both local and international talent in equal measure, and the result is a stable of brands with something for literally everybody who gives a shit about wearing nice clothes. It’s also worth pointing out that their in-store blog is on the power flex too, with a great mixture of long form articles, cute staff bios and competitions for *gasp* non clothing related prizes (like tickets to concerts at the Sydney motherfucking Opera house).
4. Supply store Sydney 
One of the v rare stores in Australia to stock Supreme (amongst some other household streetwear names), Supply is Mt Rushmore for Australian hypebeasters. With both hands firmly on the trigger, Supply has murked its competition by supplying Sydney’s burgeoning streetwear connoisseurs with some of the best brands in the game. With WTAPS and Nanamica as stand outs, local kids now have a chance at that sweet Japanese steelo we’ve all been hearing so much about.
They also stock those wavy incense burners that Jon Moy is freaking the fuck out over so you know that shit is good. With a great e-commerce front and a very low key physical presence, Supply has built a reputation as one of Sydney’s realest dealers when it comes to streetwear.
3. Chiodo Melbourne 
People who frequently shit on Melbourne’s retail scene need to take a trip to Chiodo, one of the City of Four Season’s greatest triumphs. Located in Melbourne’s heart in an underground walk-in, Chiodo will immediately remind you why being from anywhere else in Australia basically sucks balls.
The whole space is curated with an out of this world taste level, and individual sections of the store frequently are dedicated to rotated brands. The usual array of fashunz insta-cops is available and if CDG, Deemeulemeester and Raf ‘Please Stop Crying’ Simons aren’t your bag there’s also a giant doggie in store that roams around being friendly with customers.  It should also be noted that Chiodo is one of the few physical storefronts that carries Special Edition, and all the very time sensitive fashion parody gear they create.
2. Harrolds (Melbourne/Sydney)
While the majority of Australia’s contemporary menswear scene seems to be riding the streetwear wave (better late than never right) there’s a reason Harrolds clocks it at number 2 on this list. Even getting through the door is an intimidating prospect, as you have to be at least one hundred stacks tall to foot the cost of entry. With wall to wall Kiton, Thom Browne and Saint Laurent on show this is not a store for the faint of heart or the empty of wallet. Designed by Melbourne based Japanese architect Victor Isobe, the Harrolds menswear emporiums are dedicated to providing gentlemen shoppers with the very best that ready to wear clothing has to offer, a myriad of rooms dedicated to clothing for specific lifestyles and occasions (all of them ridiculously wealthy). The customer service is as attentive as you’d expect, and the mixture of classical and directional brands is an indication of the curatorial detail that goes into selecting product.
The crown jewel in the Harrolds dominion however is its association with Tom Ford. Both the Melbourne and Sydney stores house the official Tom Ford menswear boutiques, and are a literal armoury of all things luxe, wealth and baller. Aside from the ready to wear collections and Tom Ford Beauty products available, Harrolds also operates a made to measure service with special guest appearances by Antonio Blazevic, Ford’s master tailor. At upwards of $6000 a piece, you’re encouraged to savour your time in-store.
1. P.Johnson Sydney 
 Located in Paddington, widely considered the steeziest district in Sydney, the original P. Johnson showroom is the epitome of Australia’s contribution to #menswear. While it has a secondary location in Melbourne, nothing beats the original recipe, and when it comes to the subject of tailoring you’ll be hard pressed to find a man as passionate, informed and inspiring as the OG boss don Patrick Johnson. Don’t believe me? Search the P Johnson tag on Tumblr and weep upon the sheer infinite number of notes the name elicits compared to other feeble pretenders.

Patrick’s store embodies the best qualities of the Australian tailoring model: its beginner friendly, flexible, offers a staggering amount of customisation and is genuinely a neat space to set foot in. From the myriad of detail related minutiae that pepper all of his styling, to the many richly coloured Drakes ties that line the store’s walls this is sprezzy menswear in its purest single malt form. Patrick and co work from a number of base models to build your dream suit and despite the glorious luxury of the whole affair he remains one of Australia’s most affordable tailors. P. Johnson nabs the top spot on our list because it is an experience unique to Australia, available only to those who travel to our sandy shark infested shores. Besides, when your product is the subject of praise by Tumblr heavyweights like Ethan Newton and Alessandro Restivo, the rest of us peasants are all but legally obligated to fall in line.  Quit copping those cosy boy/drug dealer type pants, because if you ever want to purchase a made to measure rig it should be from this joint.
STYLETERNITY  
The 10 best menswear shops in Australia 
When push comes to shove you gotta pay homage to the #menswear Meccas of the world. Trust me, there’s no shortage of great countries to purchase crisp garments from and when you factor in the hype associated with buying from many of these exotic locales (think North America, Japan and France) your first port of call is unlikely to be Australia. 
We’re famously known for our played out wildlife, friendly immigration policy and drinking before midday but the fact of the matter is that we also have some fucking awesome brick and mortar menswear stores, provided you look hard enough. 
So for my Straya’ side bros and all you well moneyed wannabe influencers, know that I got your back and have provided the definitive list of the 10 best menswear stores down under.
10. Fallow Brisbane
It ain’t Chi-city, but I gotta put some love down for Brisbane, the capital of Australia’s reddest state Queensland. While Brisbane suffers the unfortunate dilemma of not being quite as tapped in to trends as Melbourne and not quite as big as Sydney, it has its own very distinctive niche when it comes to #menswear. Fallow, is a long time institution, located on the 2nd floor of an unassuming walk-up in the city’s nightlife (a.k.a sneak-handjob) district.
The store itself is a nightmarish fusion of local and international Goth Ninja/high fashion type designers (the standout being Silent by Damir Doma) with an emphasis on very drapey very dramatic apparel. While not strictly menswear (they stock Shaman-Goth robes for your auburn haired lady) the store pulls some Union LA type shit with a range of cool curiosities including candles, skull themed accessories and plates worth more than the greasy student food you can afford to put on them.
9. Apartment Brisbane
Located in a quieter part of the city, Apartment is now in its 3rd generation since it originally opened in 2006.  The current store is located in a heritage listed brick and mortar setup and has continued to serve Brisbane with a stable of brands we’re totally unworthy of. It’s the only location in this part of Australia which stocks that coveted White Mountaineering type shit and also is home to the local Carhartt WIP store-in-store. They recently started stocking the Diemme X Carhartt collab, so there’s plenty for heritage nerds and streetwear heads to get excited about.
Apartment lives up to its title with a large and lofty retail space perfect for doing some casual low key money burning. Brothers Nick and Ben Chiu, co-founders of the shop spent a couple years abroad in New York. They honed their taste there so they could come back to Australia and stunt on the bootcut jean and band tee wearing masses with one of the most visually pleasing spaces to buy jawnz in.
8. Dirtbox Brisbane
Located in the rear of an unassuming lame-as-fuck mall in the middle of Brisbane’s very tiny CBD, Dirtbox is a study in the suspension of disbelief. Despite a relatively small layout and its consignment next to mall level mediocrity (think brands like Lee) it has managed to thrive and survive in this locale.  While the store staff is definitely onto the next one with their always on-point apparel, their attitude is down to Earth when it comes to serving customers.
With a grip of brands like Norse Projects, Moscot & Our Legacy this is the equivalent of a mom and pop store for the hypebeast/heritage/streetwear junkie. They were also named one of GQ Australia’s stores of 2013: a feat made even rarer considering Dirtbox is not located in either of Australia’s style capitals. 
7. Someday Store Melbourne
While Someday is not a purely menswear related operation, its stable of brands and total lifestyle approach to product make it a worthy addition to this list. One of the three known locations in which the Australian hypebeast can cop Supreme, the store also stocks a range of luxury shaman garments (Visvim) and thoughtful accoutrements (Original Fake) perfect for young gunz with zero sense of fiscal responsibility.
Moreover, Someday is home to Perks and Mini (P.A.M), the streetwear brainchild of Misha Hollenbach and Shauna T. The label is renowned for its hybridisation of art, utility and fashion and makes some of the realest cosy boy attire I’ve seen this side of the world. It also helps that the P.A.M brand includes a fully fledged men’s and women’s collection in addition to a side of skrong footwear and accessories. Think rustic prints, burnt colours and all that sort of earthy murder.
6. Double Monk Melbourne 
So this list is pretty saturated with streetwear, and a lot of you sprezz monkeys are – no doubt – feeling left out. That’s where Double Monk comes in: as one of the only dedicated artisanal shoe haberdashers in Australia, you can be assured the store is on that CEO/VIP lifestyle trip. In this temple to everything that is Anglo-Italian you’ll find a glut of wealth level footwear including George Cleverley, Crockett & Jones and John Lobb. The store also has its own fully stocked bar: yeah, we’re out here. 
The guys at Double Monk offer footwear customisation, a range of that reparative liquid gold called Saphir and bespoke fittings by appointment. They’ll occasionally host a shoe polishing evening or some sort of menswear get together, making Double Monk less of a store and more of a style movement. While they gear up to join us in the 21st century with e-commerce, peep their very steezy Tumblr.
 5. Incu (Melbourne/Sydney) 
An Australian style institution since 2002, Incu is still going strong a decade on. With stores in both Melbourne and Sydney, and influencer status far beyond the realm of fashunz, Incu is a must visit destination for both local Aussies and discerning overseas shoppers.
I could spend hours getting into the power house of labels that Incu stocks but to do that would be a disservice to the pure joy of exploring their Sydney and Melbourne spaces. Suffice to say, Incu is that rare Australian retailer that nurtures both local and international talent in equal measure, and the result is a stable of brands with something for literally everybody who gives a shit about wearing nice clothes. It’s also worth pointing out that their in-store blog is on the power flex too, with a great mixture of long form articles, cute staff bios and competitions for *gasp* non clothing related prizes (like tickets to concerts at the Sydney motherfucking Opera house).
4. Supply store Sydney 
One of the v rare stores in Australia to stock Supreme (amongst some other household streetwear names), Supply is Mt Rushmore for Australian hypebeasters. With both hands firmly on the trigger, Supply has murked its competition by supplying Sydney’s burgeoning streetwear connoisseurs with some of the best brands in the game. With WTAPS and Nanamica as stand outs, local kids now have a chance at that sweet Japanese steelo we’ve all been hearing so much about.
They also stock those wavy incense burners that Jon Moy is freaking the fuck out over so you know that shit is good. With a great e-commerce front and a very low key physical presence, Supply has built a reputation as one of Sydney’s realest dealers when it comes to streetwear.
3. Chiodo Melbourne 
People who frequently shit on Melbourne’s retail scene need to take a trip to Chiodo, one of the City of Four Season’s greatest triumphs. Located in Melbourne’s heart in an underground walk-in, Chiodo will immediately remind you why being from anywhere else in Australia basically sucks balls.
The whole space is curated with an out of this world taste level, and individual sections of the store frequently are dedicated to rotated brands. The usual array of fashunz insta-cops is available and if CDG, Deemeulemeester and Raf ‘Please Stop Crying’ Simons aren’t your bag there’s also a giant doggie in store that roams around being friendly with customers.  It should also be noted that Chiodo is one of the few physical storefronts that carries Special Edition, and all the very time sensitive fashion parody gear they create.
2. Harrolds (Melbourne/Sydney)
While the majority of Australia’s contemporary menswear scene seems to be riding the streetwear wave (better late than never right) there’s a reason Harrolds clocks it at number 2 on this list. Even getting through the door is an intimidating prospect, as you have to be at least one hundred stacks tall to foot the cost of entry. With wall to wall Kiton, Thom Browne and Saint Laurent on show this is not a store for the faint of heart or the empty of wallet. Designed by Melbourne based Japanese architect Victor Isobe, the Harrolds menswear emporiums are dedicated to providing gentlemen shoppers with the very best that ready to wear clothing has to offer, a myriad of rooms dedicated to clothing for specific lifestyles and occasions (all of them ridiculously wealthy). The customer service is as attentive as you’d expect, and the mixture of classical and directional brands is an indication of the curatorial detail that goes into selecting product.
The crown jewel in the Harrolds dominion however is its association with Tom Ford. Both the Melbourne and Sydney stores house the official Tom Ford menswear boutiques, and are a literal armoury of all things luxe, wealth and baller. Aside from the ready to wear collections and Tom Ford Beauty products available, Harrolds also operates a made to measure service with special guest appearances by Antonio Blazevic, Ford’s master tailor. At upwards of $6000 a piece, you’re encouraged to savour your time in-store.
1. P.Johnson Sydney 
 Located in Paddington, widely considered the steeziest district in Sydney, the original P. Johnson showroom is the epitome of Australia’s contribution to #menswear. While it has a secondary location in Melbourne, nothing beats the original recipe, and when it comes to the subject of tailoring you’ll be hard pressed to find a man as passionate, informed and inspiring as the OG boss don Patrick Johnson. Don’t believe me? Search the P Johnson tag on Tumblr and weep upon the sheer infinite number of notes the name elicits compared to other feeble pretenders.

Patrick’s store embodies the best qualities of the Australian tailoring model: its beginner friendly, flexible, offers a staggering amount of customisation and is genuinely a neat space to set foot in. From the myriad of detail related minutiae that pepper all of his styling, to the many richly coloured Drakes ties that line the store’s walls this is sprezzy menswear in its purest single malt form. Patrick and co work from a number of base models to build your dream suit and despite the glorious luxury of the whole affair he remains one of Australia’s most affordable tailors. P. Johnson nabs the top spot on our list because it is an experience unique to Australia, available only to those who travel to our sandy shark infested shores. Besides, when your product is the subject of praise by Tumblr heavyweights like Ethan Newton and Alessandro Restivo, the rest of us peasants are all but legally obligated to fall in line.  Quit copping those cosy boy/drug dealer type pants, because if you ever want to purchase a made to measure rig it should be from this joint.
STYLETERNITY  
The 10 best menswear shops in Australia 
When push comes to shove you gotta pay homage to the #menswear Meccas of the world. Trust me, there’s no shortage of great countries to purchase crisp garments from and when you factor in the hype associated with buying from many of these exotic locales (think North America, Japan and France) your first port of call is unlikely to be Australia. 
We’re famously known for our played out wildlife, friendly immigration policy and drinking before midday but the fact of the matter is that we also have some fucking awesome brick and mortar menswear stores, provided you look hard enough. 
So for my Straya’ side bros and all you well moneyed wannabe influencers, know that I got your back and have provided the definitive list of the 10 best menswear stores down under.
10. Fallow Brisbane
It ain’t Chi-city, but I gotta put some love down for Brisbane, the capital of Australia’s reddest state Queensland. While Brisbane suffers the unfortunate dilemma of not being quite as tapped in to trends as Melbourne and not quite as big as Sydney, it has its own very distinctive niche when it comes to #menswear. Fallow, is a long time institution, located on the 2nd floor of an unassuming walk-up in the city’s nightlife (a.k.a sneak-handjob) district.
The store itself is a nightmarish fusion of local and international Goth Ninja/high fashion type designers (the standout being Silent by Damir Doma) with an emphasis on very drapey very dramatic apparel. While not strictly menswear (they stock Shaman-Goth robes for your auburn haired lady) the store pulls some Union LA type shit with a range of cool curiosities including candles, skull themed accessories and plates worth more than the greasy student food you can afford to put on them.
9. Apartment Brisbane
Located in a quieter part of the city, Apartment is now in its 3rd generation since it originally opened in 2006.  The current store is located in a heritage listed brick and mortar setup and has continued to serve Brisbane with a stable of brands we’re totally unworthy of. It’s the only location in this part of Australia which stocks that coveted White Mountaineering type shit and also is home to the local Carhartt WIP store-in-store. They recently started stocking the Diemme X Carhartt collab, so there’s plenty for heritage nerds and streetwear heads to get excited about.
Apartment lives up to its title with a large and lofty retail space perfect for doing some casual low key money burning. Brothers Nick and Ben Chiu, co-founders of the shop spent a couple years abroad in New York. They honed their taste there so they could come back to Australia and stunt on the bootcut jean and band tee wearing masses with one of the most visually pleasing spaces to buy jawnz in.
8. Dirtbox Brisbane
Located in the rear of an unassuming lame-as-fuck mall in the middle of Brisbane’s very tiny CBD, Dirtbox is a study in the suspension of disbelief. Despite a relatively small layout and its consignment next to mall level mediocrity (think brands like Lee) it has managed to thrive and survive in this locale.  While the store staff is definitely onto the next one with their always on-point apparel, their attitude is down to Earth when it comes to serving customers.
With a grip of brands like Norse Projects, Moscot & Our Legacy this is the equivalent of a mom and pop store for the hypebeast/heritage/streetwear junkie. They were also named one of GQ Australia’s stores of 2013: a feat made even rarer considering Dirtbox is not located in either of Australia’s style capitals. 
7. Someday Store Melbourne
While Someday is not a purely menswear related operation, its stable of brands and total lifestyle approach to product make it a worthy addition to this list. One of the three known locations in which the Australian hypebeast can cop Supreme, the store also stocks a range of luxury shaman garments (Visvim) and thoughtful accoutrements (Original Fake) perfect for young gunz with zero sense of fiscal responsibility.
Moreover, Someday is home to Perks and Mini (P.A.M), the streetwear brainchild of Misha Hollenbach and Shauna T. The label is renowned for its hybridisation of art, utility and fashion and makes some of the realest cosy boy attire I’ve seen this side of the world. It also helps that the P.A.M brand includes a fully fledged men’s and women’s collection in addition to a side of skrong footwear and accessories. Think rustic prints, burnt colours and all that sort of earthy murder.
6. Double Monk Melbourne 
So this list is pretty saturated with streetwear, and a lot of you sprezz monkeys are – no doubt – feeling left out. That’s where Double Monk comes in: as one of the only dedicated artisanal shoe haberdashers in Australia, you can be assured the store is on that CEO/VIP lifestyle trip. In this temple to everything that is Anglo-Italian you’ll find a glut of wealth level footwear including George Cleverley, Crockett & Jones and John Lobb. The store also has its own fully stocked bar: yeah, we’re out here. 
The guys at Double Monk offer footwear customisation, a range of that reparative liquid gold called Saphir and bespoke fittings by appointment. They’ll occasionally host a shoe polishing evening or some sort of menswear get together, making Double Monk less of a store and more of a style movement. While they gear up to join us in the 21st century with e-commerce, peep their very steezy Tumblr.
 5. Incu (Melbourne/Sydney) 
An Australian style institution since 2002, Incu is still going strong a decade on. With stores in both Melbourne and Sydney, and influencer status far beyond the realm of fashunz, Incu is a must visit destination for both local Aussies and discerning overseas shoppers.
I could spend hours getting into the power house of labels that Incu stocks but to do that would be a disservice to the pure joy of exploring their Sydney and Melbourne spaces. Suffice to say, Incu is that rare Australian retailer that nurtures both local and international talent in equal measure, and the result is a stable of brands with something for literally everybody who gives a shit about wearing nice clothes. It’s also worth pointing out that their in-store blog is on the power flex too, with a great mixture of long form articles, cute staff bios and competitions for *gasp* non clothing related prizes (like tickets to concerts at the Sydney motherfucking Opera house).
4. Supply store Sydney 
One of the v rare stores in Australia to stock Supreme (amongst some other household streetwear names), Supply is Mt Rushmore for Australian hypebeasters. With both hands firmly on the trigger, Supply has murked its competition by supplying Sydney’s burgeoning streetwear connoisseurs with some of the best brands in the game. With WTAPS and Nanamica as stand outs, local kids now have a chance at that sweet Japanese steelo we’ve all been hearing so much about.
They also stock those wavy incense burners that Jon Moy is freaking the fuck out over so you know that shit is good. With a great e-commerce front and a very low key physical presence, Supply has built a reputation as one of Sydney’s realest dealers when it comes to streetwear.
3. Chiodo Melbourne 
People who frequently shit on Melbourne’s retail scene need to take a trip to Chiodo, one of the City of Four Season’s greatest triumphs. Located in Melbourne’s heart in an underground walk-in, Chiodo will immediately remind you why being from anywhere else in Australia basically sucks balls.
The whole space is curated with an out of this world taste level, and individual sections of the store frequently are dedicated to rotated brands. The usual array of fashunz insta-cops is available and if CDG, Deemeulemeester and Raf ‘Please Stop Crying’ Simons aren’t your bag there’s also a giant doggie in store that roams around being friendly with customers.  It should also be noted that Chiodo is one of the few physical storefronts that carries Special Edition, and all the very time sensitive fashion parody gear they create.
2. Harrolds (Melbourne/Sydney)
While the majority of Australia’s contemporary menswear scene seems to be riding the streetwear wave (better late than never right) there’s a reason Harrolds clocks it at number 2 on this list. Even getting through the door is an intimidating prospect, as you have to be at least one hundred stacks tall to foot the cost of entry. With wall to wall Kiton, Thom Browne and Saint Laurent on show this is not a store for the faint of heart or the empty of wallet. Designed by Melbourne based Japanese architect Victor Isobe, the Harrolds menswear emporiums are dedicated to providing gentlemen shoppers with the very best that ready to wear clothing has to offer, a myriad of rooms dedicated to clothing for specific lifestyles and occasions (all of them ridiculously wealthy). The customer service is as attentive as you’d expect, and the mixture of classical and directional brands is an indication of the curatorial detail that goes into selecting product.
The crown jewel in the Harrolds dominion however is its association with Tom Ford. Both the Melbourne and Sydney stores house the official Tom Ford menswear boutiques, and are a literal armoury of all things luxe, wealth and baller. Aside from the ready to wear collections and Tom Ford Beauty products available, Harrolds also operates a made to measure service with special guest appearances by Antonio Blazevic, Ford’s master tailor. At upwards of $6000 a piece, you’re encouraged to savour your time in-store.
1. P.Johnson Sydney 
 Located in Paddington, widely considered the steeziest district in Sydney, the original P. Johnson showroom is the epitome of Australia’s contribution to #menswear. While it has a secondary location in Melbourne, nothing beats the original recipe, and when it comes to the subject of tailoring you’ll be hard pressed to find a man as passionate, informed and inspiring as the OG boss don Patrick Johnson. Don’t believe me? Search the P Johnson tag on Tumblr and weep upon the sheer infinite number of notes the name elicits compared to other feeble pretenders.

Patrick’s store embodies the best qualities of the Australian tailoring model: its beginner friendly, flexible, offers a staggering amount of customisation and is genuinely a neat space to set foot in. From the myriad of detail related minutiae that pepper all of his styling, to the many richly coloured Drakes ties that line the store’s walls this is sprezzy menswear in its purest single malt form. Patrick and co work from a number of base models to build your dream suit and despite the glorious luxury of the whole affair he remains one of Australia’s most affordable tailors. P. Johnson nabs the top spot on our list because it is an experience unique to Australia, available only to those who travel to our sandy shark infested shores. Besides, when your product is the subject of praise by Tumblr heavyweights like Ethan Newton and Alessandro Restivo, the rest of us peasants are all but legally obligated to fall in line.  Quit copping those cosy boy/drug dealer type pants, because if you ever want to purchase a made to measure rig it should be from this joint.
STYLETERNITY  
The 10 best menswear shops in Australia 
When push comes to shove you gotta pay homage to the #menswear Meccas of the world. Trust me, there’s no shortage of great countries to purchase crisp garments from and when you factor in the hype associated with buying from many of these exotic locales (think North America, Japan and France) your first port of call is unlikely to be Australia. 
We’re famously known for our played out wildlife, friendly immigration policy and drinking before midday but the fact of the matter is that we also have some fucking awesome brick and mortar menswear stores, provided you look hard enough. 
So for my Straya’ side bros and all you well moneyed wannabe influencers, know that I got your back and have provided the definitive list of the 10 best menswear stores down under.
10. Fallow Brisbane
It ain’t Chi-city, but I gotta put some love down for Brisbane, the capital of Australia’s reddest state Queensland. While Brisbane suffers the unfortunate dilemma of not being quite as tapped in to trends as Melbourne and not quite as big as Sydney, it has its own very distinctive niche when it comes to #menswear. Fallow, is a long time institution, located on the 2nd floor of an unassuming walk-up in the city’s nightlife (a.k.a sneak-handjob) district.
The store itself is a nightmarish fusion of local and international Goth Ninja/high fashion type designers (the standout being Silent by Damir Doma) with an emphasis on very drapey very dramatic apparel. While not strictly menswear (they stock Shaman-Goth robes for your auburn haired lady) the store pulls some Union LA type shit with a range of cool curiosities including candles, skull themed accessories and plates worth more than the greasy student food you can afford to put on them.
9. Apartment Brisbane
Located in a quieter part of the city, Apartment is now in its 3rd generation since it originally opened in 2006.  The current store is located in a heritage listed brick and mortar setup and has continued to serve Brisbane with a stable of brands we’re totally unworthy of. It’s the only location in this part of Australia which stocks that coveted White Mountaineering type shit and also is home to the local Carhartt WIP store-in-store. They recently started stocking the Diemme X Carhartt collab, so there’s plenty for heritage nerds and streetwear heads to get excited about.
Apartment lives up to its title with a large and lofty retail space perfect for doing some casual low key money burning. Brothers Nick and Ben Chiu, co-founders of the shop spent a couple years abroad in New York. They honed their taste there so they could come back to Australia and stunt on the bootcut jean and band tee wearing masses with one of the most visually pleasing spaces to buy jawnz in.
8. Dirtbox Brisbane
Located in the rear of an unassuming lame-as-fuck mall in the middle of Brisbane’s very tiny CBD, Dirtbox is a study in the suspension of disbelief. Despite a relatively small layout and its consignment next to mall level mediocrity (think brands like Lee) it has managed to thrive and survive in this locale.  While the store staff is definitely onto the next one with their always on-point apparel, their attitude is down to Earth when it comes to serving customers.
With a grip of brands like Norse Projects, Moscot & Our Legacy this is the equivalent of a mom and pop store for the hypebeast/heritage/streetwear junkie. They were also named one of GQ Australia’s stores of 2013: a feat made even rarer considering Dirtbox is not located in either of Australia’s style capitals. 
7. Someday Store Melbourne
While Someday is not a purely menswear related operation, its stable of brands and total lifestyle approach to product make it a worthy addition to this list. One of the three known locations in which the Australian hypebeast can cop Supreme, the store also stocks a range of luxury shaman garments (Visvim) and thoughtful accoutrements (Original Fake) perfect for young gunz with zero sense of fiscal responsibility.
Moreover, Someday is home to Perks and Mini (P.A.M), the streetwear brainchild of Misha Hollenbach and Shauna T. The label is renowned for its hybridisation of art, utility and fashion and makes some of the realest cosy boy attire I’ve seen this side of the world. It also helps that the P.A.M brand includes a fully fledged men’s and women’s collection in addition to a side of skrong footwear and accessories. Think rustic prints, burnt colours and all that sort of earthy murder.
6. Double Monk Melbourne 
So this list is pretty saturated with streetwear, and a lot of you sprezz monkeys are – no doubt – feeling left out. That’s where Double Monk comes in: as one of the only dedicated artisanal shoe haberdashers in Australia, you can be assured the store is on that CEO/VIP lifestyle trip. In this temple to everything that is Anglo-Italian you’ll find a glut of wealth level footwear including George Cleverley, Crockett & Jones and John Lobb. The store also has its own fully stocked bar: yeah, we’re out here. 
The guys at Double Monk offer footwear customisation, a range of that reparative liquid gold called Saphir and bespoke fittings by appointment. They’ll occasionally host a shoe polishing evening or some sort of menswear get together, making Double Monk less of a store and more of a style movement. While they gear up to join us in the 21st century with e-commerce, peep their very steezy Tumblr.
 5. Incu (Melbourne/Sydney) 
An Australian style institution since 2002, Incu is still going strong a decade on. With stores in both Melbourne and Sydney, and influencer status far beyond the realm of fashunz, Incu is a must visit destination for both local Aussies and discerning overseas shoppers.
I could spend hours getting into the power house of labels that Incu stocks but to do that would be a disservice to the pure joy of exploring their Sydney and Melbourne spaces. Suffice to say, Incu is that rare Australian retailer that nurtures both local and international talent in equal measure, and the result is a stable of brands with something for literally everybody who gives a shit about wearing nice clothes. It’s also worth pointing out that their in-store blog is on the power flex too, with a great mixture of long form articles, cute staff bios and competitions for *gasp* non clothing related prizes (like tickets to concerts at the Sydney motherfucking Opera house).
4. Supply store Sydney 
One of the v rare stores in Australia to stock Supreme (amongst some other household streetwear names), Supply is Mt Rushmore for Australian hypebeasters. With both hands firmly on the trigger, Supply has murked its competition by supplying Sydney’s burgeoning streetwear connoisseurs with some of the best brands in the game. With WTAPS and Nanamica as stand outs, local kids now have a chance at that sweet Japanese steelo we’ve all been hearing so much about.
They also stock those wavy incense burners that Jon Moy is freaking the fuck out over so you know that shit is good. With a great e-commerce front and a very low key physical presence, Supply has built a reputation as one of Sydney’s realest dealers when it comes to streetwear.
3. Chiodo Melbourne 
People who frequently shit on Melbourne’s retail scene need to take a trip to Chiodo, one of the City of Four Season’s greatest triumphs. Located in Melbourne’s heart in an underground walk-in, Chiodo will immediately remind you why being from anywhere else in Australia basically sucks balls.
The whole space is curated with an out of this world taste level, and individual sections of the store frequently are dedicated to rotated brands. The usual array of fashunz insta-cops is available and if CDG, Deemeulemeester and Raf ‘Please Stop Crying’ Simons aren’t your bag there’s also a giant doggie in store that roams around being friendly with customers.  It should also be noted that Chiodo is one of the few physical storefronts that carries Special Edition, and all the very time sensitive fashion parody gear they create.
2. Harrolds (Melbourne/Sydney)
While the majority of Australia’s contemporary menswear scene seems to be riding the streetwear wave (better late than never right) there’s a reason Harrolds clocks it at number 2 on this list. Even getting through the door is an intimidating prospect, as you have to be at least one hundred stacks tall to foot the cost of entry. With wall to wall Kiton, Thom Browne and Saint Laurent on show this is not a store for the faint of heart or the empty of wallet. Designed by Melbourne based Japanese architect Victor Isobe, the Harrolds menswear emporiums are dedicated to providing gentlemen shoppers with the very best that ready to wear clothing has to offer, a myriad of rooms dedicated to clothing for specific lifestyles and occasions (all of them ridiculously wealthy). The customer service is as attentive as you’d expect, and the mixture of classical and directional brands is an indication of the curatorial detail that goes into selecting product.
The crown jewel in the Harrolds dominion however is its association with Tom Ford. Both the Melbourne and Sydney stores house the official Tom Ford menswear boutiques, and are a literal armoury of all things luxe, wealth and baller. Aside from the ready to wear collections and Tom Ford Beauty products available, Harrolds also operates a made to measure service with special guest appearances by Antonio Blazevic, Ford’s master tailor. At upwards of $6000 a piece, you’re encouraged to savour your time in-store.
1. P.Johnson Sydney 
 Located in Paddington, widely considered the steeziest district in Sydney, the original P. Johnson showroom is the epitome of Australia’s contribution to #menswear. While it has a secondary location in Melbourne, nothing beats the original recipe, and when it comes to the subject of tailoring you’ll be hard pressed to find a man as passionate, informed and inspiring as the OG boss don Patrick Johnson. Don’t believe me? Search the P Johnson tag on Tumblr and weep upon the sheer infinite number of notes the name elicits compared to other feeble pretenders.

Patrick’s store embodies the best qualities of the Australian tailoring model: its beginner friendly, flexible, offers a staggering amount of customisation and is genuinely a neat space to set foot in. From the myriad of detail related minutiae that pepper all of his styling, to the many richly coloured Drakes ties that line the store’s walls this is sprezzy menswear in its purest single malt form. Patrick and co work from a number of base models to build your dream suit and despite the glorious luxury of the whole affair he remains one of Australia’s most affordable tailors. P. Johnson nabs the top spot on our list because it is an experience unique to Australia, available only to those who travel to our sandy shark infested shores. Besides, when your product is the subject of praise by Tumblr heavyweights like Ethan Newton and Alessandro Restivo, the rest of us peasants are all but legally obligated to fall in line.  Quit copping those cosy boy/drug dealer type pants, because if you ever want to purchase a made to measure rig it should be from this joint.
STYLETERNITY  
The 10 best menswear shops in Australia 
When push comes to shove you gotta pay homage to the #menswear Meccas of the world. Trust me, there’s no shortage of great countries to purchase crisp garments from and when you factor in the hype associated with buying from many of these exotic locales (think North America, Japan and France) your first port of call is unlikely to be Australia. 
We’re famously known for our played out wildlife, friendly immigration policy and drinking before midday but the fact of the matter is that we also have some fucking awesome brick and mortar menswear stores, provided you look hard enough. 
So for my Straya’ side bros and all you well moneyed wannabe influencers, know that I got your back and have provided the definitive list of the 10 best menswear stores down under.
10. Fallow Brisbane
It ain’t Chi-city, but I gotta put some love down for Brisbane, the capital of Australia’s reddest state Queensland. While Brisbane suffers the unfortunate dilemma of not being quite as tapped in to trends as Melbourne and not quite as big as Sydney, it has its own very distinctive niche when it comes to #menswear. Fallow, is a long time institution, located on the 2nd floor of an unassuming walk-up in the city’s nightlife (a.k.a sneak-handjob) district.
The store itself is a nightmarish fusion of local and international Goth Ninja/high fashion type designers (the standout being Silent by Damir Doma) with an emphasis on very drapey very dramatic apparel. While not strictly menswear (they stock Shaman-Goth robes for your auburn haired lady) the store pulls some Union LA type shit with a range of cool curiosities including candles, skull themed accessories and plates worth more than the greasy student food you can afford to put on them.
9. Apartment Brisbane
Located in a quieter part of the city, Apartment is now in its 3rd generation since it originally opened in 2006.  The current store is located in a heritage listed brick and mortar setup and has continued to serve Brisbane with a stable of brands we’re totally unworthy of. It’s the only location in this part of Australia which stocks that coveted White Mountaineering type shit and also is home to the local Carhartt WIP store-in-store. They recently started stocking the Diemme X Carhartt collab, so there’s plenty for heritage nerds and streetwear heads to get excited about.
Apartment lives up to its title with a large and lofty retail space perfect for doing some casual low key money burning. Brothers Nick and Ben Chiu, co-founders of the shop spent a couple years abroad in New York. They honed their taste there so they could come back to Australia and stunt on the bootcut jean and band tee wearing masses with one of the most visually pleasing spaces to buy jawnz in.
8. Dirtbox Brisbane
Located in the rear of an unassuming lame-as-fuck mall in the middle of Brisbane’s very tiny CBD, Dirtbox is a study in the suspension of disbelief. Despite a relatively small layout and its consignment next to mall level mediocrity (think brands like Lee) it has managed to thrive and survive in this locale.  While the store staff is definitely onto the next one with their always on-point apparel, their attitude is down to Earth when it comes to serving customers.
With a grip of brands like Norse Projects, Moscot & Our Legacy this is the equivalent of a mom and pop store for the hypebeast/heritage/streetwear junkie. They were also named one of GQ Australia’s stores of 2013: a feat made even rarer considering Dirtbox is not located in either of Australia’s style capitals. 
7. Someday Store Melbourne
While Someday is not a purely menswear related operation, its stable of brands and total lifestyle approach to product make it a worthy addition to this list. One of the three known locations in which the Australian hypebeast can cop Supreme, the store also stocks a range of luxury shaman garments (Visvim) and thoughtful accoutrements (Original Fake) perfect for young gunz with zero sense of fiscal responsibility.
Moreover, Someday is home to Perks and Mini (P.A.M), the streetwear brainchild of Misha Hollenbach and Shauna T. The label is renowned for its hybridisation of art, utility and fashion and makes some of the realest cosy boy attire I’ve seen this side of the world. It also helps that the P.A.M brand includes a fully fledged men’s and women’s collection in addition to a side of skrong footwear and accessories. Think rustic prints, burnt colours and all that sort of earthy murder.
6. Double Monk Melbourne 
So this list is pretty saturated with streetwear, and a lot of you sprezz monkeys are – no doubt – feeling left out. That’s where Double Monk comes in: as one of the only dedicated artisanal shoe haberdashers in Australia, you can be assured the store is on that CEO/VIP lifestyle trip. In this temple to everything that is Anglo-Italian you’ll find a glut of wealth level footwear including George Cleverley, Crockett & Jones and John Lobb. The store also has its own fully stocked bar: yeah, we’re out here. 
The guys at Double Monk offer footwear customisation, a range of that reparative liquid gold called Saphir and bespoke fittings by appointment. They’ll occasionally host a shoe polishing evening or some sort of menswear get together, making Double Monk less of a store and more of a style movement. While they gear up to join us in the 21st century with e-commerce, peep their very steezy Tumblr.
 5. Incu (Melbourne/Sydney) 
An Australian style institution since 2002, Incu is still going strong a decade on. With stores in both Melbourne and Sydney, and influencer status far beyond the realm of fashunz, Incu is a must visit destination for both local Aussies and discerning overseas shoppers.
I could spend hours getting into the power house of labels that Incu stocks but to do that would be a disservice to the pure joy of exploring their Sydney and Melbourne spaces. Suffice to say, Incu is that rare Australian retailer that nurtures both local and international talent in equal measure, and the result is a stable of brands with something for literally everybody who gives a shit about wearing nice clothes. It’s also worth pointing out that their in-store blog is on the power flex too, with a great mixture of long form articles, cute staff bios and competitions for *gasp* non clothing related prizes (like tickets to concerts at the Sydney motherfucking Opera house).
4. Supply store Sydney 
One of the v rare stores in Australia to stock Supreme (amongst some other household streetwear names), Supply is Mt Rushmore for Australian hypebeasters. With both hands firmly on the trigger, Supply has murked its competition by supplying Sydney’s burgeoning streetwear connoisseurs with some of the best brands in the game. With WTAPS and Nanamica as stand outs, local kids now have a chance at that sweet Japanese steelo we’ve all been hearing so much about.
They also stock those wavy incense burners that Jon Moy is freaking the fuck out over so you know that shit is good. With a great e-commerce front and a very low key physical presence, Supply has built a reputation as one of Sydney’s realest dealers when it comes to streetwear.
3. Chiodo Melbourne 
People who frequently shit on Melbourne’s retail scene need to take a trip to Chiodo, one of the City of Four Season’s greatest triumphs. Located in Melbourne’s heart in an underground walk-in, Chiodo will immediately remind you why being from anywhere else in Australia basically sucks balls.
The whole space is curated with an out of this world taste level, and individual sections of the store frequently are dedicated to rotated brands. The usual array of fashunz insta-cops is available and if CDG, Deemeulemeester and Raf ‘Please Stop Crying’ Simons aren’t your bag there’s also a giant doggie in store that roams around being friendly with customers.  It should also be noted that Chiodo is one of the few physical storefronts that carries Special Edition, and all the very time sensitive fashion parody gear they create.
2. Harrolds (Melbourne/Sydney)
While the majority of Australia’s contemporary menswear scene seems to be riding the streetwear wave (better late than never right) there’s a reason Harrolds clocks it at number 2 on this list. Even getting through the door is an intimidating prospect, as you have to be at least one hundred stacks tall to foot the cost of entry. With wall to wall Kiton, Thom Browne and Saint Laurent on show this is not a store for the faint of heart or the empty of wallet. Designed by Melbourne based Japanese architect Victor Isobe, the Harrolds menswear emporiums are dedicated to providing gentlemen shoppers with the very best that ready to wear clothing has to offer, a myriad of rooms dedicated to clothing for specific lifestyles and occasions (all of them ridiculously wealthy). The customer service is as attentive as you’d expect, and the mixture of classical and directional brands is an indication of the curatorial detail that goes into selecting product.
The crown jewel in the Harrolds dominion however is its association with Tom Ford. Both the Melbourne and Sydney stores house the official Tom Ford menswear boutiques, and are a literal armoury of all things luxe, wealth and baller. Aside from the ready to wear collections and Tom Ford Beauty products available, Harrolds also operates a made to measure service with special guest appearances by Antonio Blazevic, Ford’s master tailor. At upwards of $6000 a piece, you’re encouraged to savour your time in-store.
1. P.Johnson Sydney 
 Located in Paddington, widely considered the steeziest district in Sydney, the original P. Johnson showroom is the epitome of Australia’s contribution to #menswear. While it has a secondary location in Melbourne, nothing beats the original recipe, and when it comes to the subject of tailoring you’ll be hard pressed to find a man as passionate, informed and inspiring as the OG boss don Patrick Johnson. Don’t believe me? Search the P Johnson tag on Tumblr and weep upon the sheer infinite number of notes the name elicits compared to other feeble pretenders.

Patrick’s store embodies the best qualities of the Australian tailoring model: its beginner friendly, flexible, offers a staggering amount of customisation and is genuinely a neat space to set foot in. From the myriad of detail related minutiae that pepper all of his styling, to the many richly coloured Drakes ties that line the store’s walls this is sprezzy menswear in its purest single malt form. Patrick and co work from a number of base models to build your dream suit and despite the glorious luxury of the whole affair he remains one of Australia’s most affordable tailors. P. Johnson nabs the top spot on our list because it is an experience unique to Australia, available only to those who travel to our sandy shark infested shores. Besides, when your product is the subject of praise by Tumblr heavyweights like Ethan Newton and Alessandro Restivo, the rest of us peasants are all but legally obligated to fall in line.  Quit copping those cosy boy/drug dealer type pants, because if you ever want to purchase a made to measure rig it should be from this joint.
STYLETERNITY  
The 10 best menswear shops in Australia 
When push comes to shove you gotta pay homage to the #menswear Meccas of the world. Trust me, there’s no shortage of great countries to purchase crisp garments from and when you factor in the hype associated with buying from many of these exotic locales (think North America, Japan and France) your first port of call is unlikely to be Australia. 
We’re famously known for our played out wildlife, friendly immigration policy and drinking before midday but the fact of the matter is that we also have some fucking awesome brick and mortar menswear stores, provided you look hard enough. 
So for my Straya’ side bros and all you well moneyed wannabe influencers, know that I got your back and have provided the definitive list of the 10 best menswear stores down under.
10. Fallow Brisbane
It ain’t Chi-city, but I gotta put some love down for Brisbane, the capital of Australia’s reddest state Queensland. While Brisbane suffers the unfortunate dilemma of not being quite as tapped in to trends as Melbourne and not quite as big as Sydney, it has its own very distinctive niche when it comes to #menswear. Fallow, is a long time institution, located on the 2nd floor of an unassuming walk-up in the city’s nightlife (a.k.a sneak-handjob) district.
The store itself is a nightmarish fusion of local and international Goth Ninja/high fashion type designers (the standout being Silent by Damir Doma) with an emphasis on very drapey very dramatic apparel. While not strictly menswear (they stock Shaman-Goth robes for your auburn haired lady) the store pulls some Union LA type shit with a range of cool curiosities including candles, skull themed accessories and plates worth more than the greasy student food you can afford to put on them.
9. Apartment Brisbane
Located in a quieter part of the city, Apartment is now in its 3rd generation since it originally opened in 2006.  The current store is located in a heritage listed brick and mortar setup and has continued to serve Brisbane with a stable of brands we’re totally unworthy of. It’s the only location in this part of Australia which stocks that coveted White Mountaineering type shit and also is home to the local Carhartt WIP store-in-store. They recently started stocking the Diemme X Carhartt collab, so there’s plenty for heritage nerds and streetwear heads to get excited about.
Apartment lives up to its title with a large and lofty retail space perfect for doing some casual low key money burning. Brothers Nick and Ben Chiu, co-founders of the shop spent a couple years abroad in New York. They honed their taste there so they could come back to Australia and stunt on the bootcut jean and band tee wearing masses with one of the most visually pleasing spaces to buy jawnz in.
8. Dirtbox Brisbane
Located in the rear of an unassuming lame-as-fuck mall in the middle of Brisbane’s very tiny CBD, Dirtbox is a study in the suspension of disbelief. Despite a relatively small layout and its consignment next to mall level mediocrity (think brands like Lee) it has managed to thrive and survive in this locale.  While the store staff is definitely onto the next one with their always on-point apparel, their attitude is down to Earth when it comes to serving customers.
With a grip of brands like Norse Projects, Moscot & Our Legacy this is the equivalent of a mom and pop store for the hypebeast/heritage/streetwear junkie. They were also named one of GQ Australia’s stores of 2013: a feat made even rarer considering Dirtbox is not located in either of Australia’s style capitals. 
7. Someday Store Melbourne
While Someday is not a purely menswear related operation, its stable of brands and total lifestyle approach to product make it a worthy addition to this list. One of the three known locations in which the Australian hypebeast can cop Supreme, the store also stocks a range of luxury shaman garments (Visvim) and thoughtful accoutrements (Original Fake) perfect for young gunz with zero sense of fiscal responsibility.
Moreover, Someday is home to Perks and Mini (P.A.M), the streetwear brainchild of Misha Hollenbach and Shauna T. The label is renowned for its hybridisation of art, utility and fashion and makes some of the realest cosy boy attire I’ve seen this side of the world. It also helps that the P.A.M brand includes a fully fledged men’s and women’s collection in addition to a side of skrong footwear and accessories. Think rustic prints, burnt colours and all that sort of earthy murder.
6. Double Monk Melbourne 
So this list is pretty saturated with streetwear, and a lot of you sprezz monkeys are – no doubt – feeling left out. That’s where Double Monk comes in: as one of the only dedicated artisanal shoe haberdashers in Australia, you can be assured the store is on that CEO/VIP lifestyle trip. In this temple to everything that is Anglo-Italian you’ll find a glut of wealth level footwear including George Cleverley, Crockett & Jones and John Lobb. The store also has its own fully stocked bar: yeah, we’re out here. 
The guys at Double Monk offer footwear customisation, a range of that reparative liquid gold called Saphir and bespoke fittings by appointment. They’ll occasionally host a shoe polishing evening or some sort of menswear get together, making Double Monk less of a store and more of a style movement. While they gear up to join us in the 21st century with e-commerce, peep their very steezy Tumblr.
 5. Incu (Melbourne/Sydney) 
An Australian style institution since 2002, Incu is still going strong a decade on. With stores in both Melbourne and Sydney, and influencer status far beyond the realm of fashunz, Incu is a must visit destination for both local Aussies and discerning overseas shoppers.
I could spend hours getting into the power house of labels that Incu stocks but to do that would be a disservice to the pure joy of exploring their Sydney and Melbourne spaces. Suffice to say, Incu is that rare Australian retailer that nurtures both local and international talent in equal measure, and the result is a stable of brands with something for literally everybody who gives a shit about wearing nice clothes. It’s also worth pointing out that their in-store blog is on the power flex too, with a great mixture of long form articles, cute staff bios and competitions for *gasp* non clothing related prizes (like tickets to concerts at the Sydney motherfucking Opera house).
4. Supply store Sydney 
One of the v rare stores in Australia to stock Supreme (amongst some other household streetwear names), Supply is Mt Rushmore for Australian hypebeasters. With both hands firmly on the trigger, Supply has murked its competition by supplying Sydney’s burgeoning streetwear connoisseurs with some of the best brands in the game. With WTAPS and Nanamica as stand outs, local kids now have a chance at that sweet Japanese steelo we’ve all been hearing so much about.
They also stock those wavy incense burners that Jon Moy is freaking the fuck out over so you know that shit is good. With a great e-commerce front and a very low key physical presence, Supply has built a reputation as one of Sydney’s realest dealers when it comes to streetwear.
3. Chiodo Melbourne 
People who frequently shit on Melbourne’s retail scene need to take a trip to Chiodo, one of the City of Four Season’s greatest triumphs. Located in Melbourne’s heart in an underground walk-in, Chiodo will immediately remind you why being from anywhere else in Australia basically sucks balls.
The whole space is curated with an out of this world taste level, and individual sections of the store frequently are dedicated to rotated brands. The usual array of fashunz insta-cops is available and if CDG, Deemeulemeester and Raf ‘Please Stop Crying’ Simons aren’t your bag there’s also a giant doggie in store that roams around being friendly with customers.  It should also be noted that Chiodo is one of the few physical storefronts that carries Special Edition, and all the very time sensitive fashion parody gear they create.
2. Harrolds (Melbourne/Sydney)
While the majority of Australia’s contemporary menswear scene seems to be riding the streetwear wave (better late than never right) there’s a reason Harrolds clocks it at number 2 on this list. Even getting through the door is an intimidating prospect, as you have to be at least one hundred stacks tall to foot the cost of entry. With wall to wall Kiton, Thom Browne and Saint Laurent on show this is not a store for the faint of heart or the empty of wallet. Designed by Melbourne based Japanese architect Victor Isobe, the Harrolds menswear emporiums are dedicated to providing gentlemen shoppers with the very best that ready to wear clothing has to offer, a myriad of rooms dedicated to clothing for specific lifestyles and occasions (all of them ridiculously wealthy). The customer service is as attentive as you’d expect, and the mixture of classical and directional brands is an indication of the curatorial detail that goes into selecting product.
The crown jewel in the Harrolds dominion however is its association with Tom Ford. Both the Melbourne and Sydney stores house the official Tom Ford menswear boutiques, and are a literal armoury of all things luxe, wealth and baller. Aside from the ready to wear collections and Tom Ford Beauty products available, Harrolds also operates a made to measure service with special guest appearances by Antonio Blazevic, Ford’s master tailor. At upwards of $6000 a piece, you’re encouraged to savour your time in-store.
1. P.Johnson Sydney 
 Located in Paddington, widely considered the steeziest district in Sydney, the original P. Johnson showroom is the epitome of Australia’s contribution to #menswear. While it has a secondary location in Melbourne, nothing beats the original recipe, and when it comes to the subject of tailoring you’ll be hard pressed to find a man as passionate, informed and inspiring as the OG boss don Patrick Johnson. Don’t believe me? Search the P Johnson tag on Tumblr and weep upon the sheer infinite number of notes the name elicits compared to other feeble pretenders.

Patrick’s store embodies the best qualities of the Australian tailoring model: its beginner friendly, flexible, offers a staggering amount of customisation and is genuinely a neat space to set foot in. From the myriad of detail related minutiae that pepper all of his styling, to the many richly coloured Drakes ties that line the store’s walls this is sprezzy menswear in its purest single malt form. Patrick and co work from a number of base models to build your dream suit and despite the glorious luxury of the whole affair he remains one of Australia’s most affordable tailors. P. Johnson nabs the top spot on our list because it is an experience unique to Australia, available only to those who travel to our sandy shark infested shores. Besides, when your product is the subject of praise by Tumblr heavyweights like Ethan Newton and Alessandro Restivo, the rest of us peasants are all but legally obligated to fall in line.  Quit copping those cosy boy/drug dealer type pants, because if you ever want to purchase a made to measure rig it should be from this joint.
STYLETERNITY  

The 10 best menswear shops in Australia

When push comes to shove you gotta pay homage to the #menswear Meccas of the world. Trust me, there’s no shortage of great countries to purchase crisp garments from and when you factor in the hype associated with buying from many of these exotic locales (think North America, Japan and France) your first port of call is unlikely to be Australia.

We’re famously known for our played out wildlife, friendly immigration policy and drinking before midday but the fact of the matter is that we also have some fucking awesome brick and mortar menswear stores, provided you look hard enough.

So for my Straya’ side bros and all you well moneyed wannabe influencers, know that I got your back and have provided the definitive list of the 10 best menswear stores down under.

10. Fallow Brisbane

It ain’t Chi-city, but I gotta put some love down for Brisbane, the capital of Australia’s reddest state Queensland. While Brisbane suffers the unfortunate dilemma of not being quite as tapped in to trends as Melbourne and not quite as big as Sydney, it has its own very distinctive niche when it comes to #menswear. Fallow, is a long time institution, located on the 2nd floor of an unassuming walk-up in the city’s nightlife (a.k.a sneak-handjob) district.

The store itself is a nightmarish fusion of local and international Goth Ninja/high fashion type designers (the standout being Silent by Damir Doma) with an emphasis on very drapey very dramatic apparel. While not strictly menswear (they stock Shaman-Goth robes for your auburn haired lady) the store pulls some Union LA type shit with a range of cool curiosities including candles, skull themed accessories and plates worth more than the greasy student food you can afford to put on them.

9. Apartment Brisbane

Located in a quieter part of the city, Apartment is now in its 3rd generation since it originally opened in 2006.  The current store is located in a heritage listed brick and mortar setup and has continued to serve Brisbane with a stable of brands we’re totally unworthy of. It’s the only location in this part of Australia which stocks that coveted White Mountaineering type shit and also is home to the local Carhartt WIP store-in-store. They recently started stocking the Diemme X Carhartt collab, so there’s plenty for heritage nerds and streetwear heads to get excited about.

Apartment lives up to its title with a large and lofty retail space perfect for doing some casual low key money burning. Brothers Nick and Ben Chiu, co-founders of the shop spent a couple years abroad in New York. They honed their taste there so they could come back to Australia and stunt on the bootcut jean and band tee wearing masses with one of the most visually pleasing spaces to buy jawnz in.

8. Dirtbox Brisbane

Located in the rear of an unassuming lame-as-fuck mall in the middle of Brisbane’s very tiny CBD, Dirtbox is a study in the suspension of disbelief. Despite a relatively small layout and its consignment next to mall level mediocrity (think brands like Lee) it has managed to thrive and survive in this locale.  While the store staff is definitely onto the next one with their always on-point apparel, their attitude is down to Earth when it comes to serving customers.

With a grip of brands like Norse Projects, Moscot & Our Legacy this is the equivalent of a mom and pop store for the hypebeast/heritage/streetwear junkie. They were also named one of GQ Australia’s stores of 2013: a feat made even rarer considering Dirtbox is not located in either of Australia’s style capitals. 

7. Someday Store Melbourne

While Someday is not a purely menswear related operation, its stable of brands and total lifestyle approach to product make it a worthy addition to this list. One of the three known locations in which the Australian hypebeast can cop Supreme, the store also stocks a range of luxury shaman garments (Visvim) and thoughtful accoutrements (Original Fake) perfect for young gunz with zero sense of fiscal responsibility.

Moreover, Someday is home to Perks and Mini (P.A.M), the streetwear brainchild of Misha Hollenbach and Shauna T. The label is renowned for its hybridisation of art, utility and fashion and makes some of the realest cosy boy attire I’ve seen this side of the world. It also helps that the P.A.M brand includes a fully fledged men’s and women’s collection in addition to a side of skrong footwear and accessories. Think rustic prints, burnt colours and all that sort of earthy murder.

6. Double Monk Melbourne

So this list is pretty saturated with streetwear, and a lot of you sprezz monkeys are – no doubt – feeling left out. That’s where Double Monk comes in: as one of the only dedicated artisanal shoe haberdashers in Australia, you can be assured the store is on that CEO/VIP lifestyle trip. In this temple to everything that is Anglo-Italian you’ll find a glut of wealth level footwear including George Cleverley, Crockett & Jones and John Lobb. The store also has its own fully stocked bar: yeah, we’re out here. 

The guys at Double Monk offer footwear customisation, a range of that reparative liquid gold called Saphir and bespoke fittings by appointment. They’ll occasionally host a shoe polishing evening or some sort of menswear get together, making Double Monk less of a store and more of a style movement. While they gear up to join us in the 21st century with e-commerce, peep their very steezy Tumblr.

 5. Incu (Melbourne/Sydney)

An Australian style institution since 2002, Incu is still going strong a decade on. With stores in both Melbourne and Sydney, and influencer status far beyond the realm of fashunz, Incu is a must visit destination for both local Aussies and discerning overseas shoppers.

I could spend hours getting into the power house of labels that Incu stocks but to do that would be a disservice to the pure joy of exploring their Sydney and Melbourne spaces. Suffice to say, Incu is that rare Australian retailer that nurtures both local and international talent in equal measure, and the result is a stable of brands with something for literally everybody who gives a shit about wearing nice clothes. It’s also worth pointing out that their in-store blog is on the power flex too, with a great mixture of long form articles, cute staff bios and competitions for *gasp* non clothing related prizes (like tickets to concerts at the Sydney motherfucking Opera house).

4. Supply store Sydney

One of the v rare stores in Australia to stock Supreme (amongst some other household streetwear names), Supply is Mt Rushmore for Australian hypebeasters. With both hands firmly on the trigger, Supply has murked its competition by supplying Sydney’s burgeoning streetwear connoisseurs with some of the best brands in the game. With WTAPS and Nanamica as stand outs, local kids now have a chance at that sweet Japanese steelo we’ve all been hearing so much about.

They also stock those wavy incense burners that Jon Moy is freaking the fuck out over so you know that shit is good. With a great e-commerce front and a very low key physical presence, Supply has built a reputation as one of Sydney’s realest dealers when it comes to streetwear.

3. Chiodo Melbourne

People who frequently shit on Melbourne’s retail scene need to take a trip to Chiodo, one of the City of Four Season’s greatest triumphs. Located in Melbourne’s heart in an underground walk-in, Chiodo will immediately remind you why being from anywhere else in Australia basically sucks balls.

The whole space is curated with an out of this world taste level, and individual sections of the store frequently are dedicated to rotated brands. The usual array of fashunz insta-cops is available and if CDG, Deemeulemeester and Raf ‘Please Stop Crying’ Simons aren’t your bag there’s also a giant doggie in store that roams around being friendly with customers.  It should also be noted that Chiodo is one of the few physical storefronts that carries Special Edition, and all the very time sensitive fashion parody gear they create.

2. Harrolds (Melbourne/Sydney)

While the majority of Australia’s contemporary menswear scene seems to be riding the streetwear wave (better late than never right) there’s a reason Harrolds clocks it at number 2 on this list. Even getting through the door is an intimidating prospect, as you have to be at least one hundred stacks tall to foot the cost of entry. With wall to wall Kiton, Thom Browne and Saint Laurent on show this is not a store for the faint of heart or the empty of wallet. Designed by Melbourne based Japanese architect Victor Isobe, the Harrolds menswear emporiums are dedicated to providing gentlemen shoppers with the very best that ready to wear clothing has to offer, a myriad of rooms dedicated to clothing for specific lifestyles and occasions (all of them ridiculously wealthy). The customer service is as attentive as you’d expect, and the mixture of classical and directional brands is an indication of the curatorial detail that goes into selecting product.

The crown jewel in the Harrolds dominion however is its association with Tom Ford. Both the Melbourne and Sydney stores house the official Tom Ford menswear boutiques, and are a literal armoury of all things luxe, wealth and baller. Aside from the ready to wear collections and Tom Ford Beauty products available, Harrolds also operates a made to measure service with special guest appearances by Antonio Blazevic, Ford’s master tailor. At upwards of $6000 a piece, you’re encouraged to savour your time in-store.

1. P.Johnson Sydney

 Located in Paddington, widely considered the steeziest district in Sydney, the original P. Johnson showroom is the epitome of Australia’s contribution to #menswear. While it has a secondary location in Melbourne, nothing beats the original recipe, and when it comes to the subject of tailoring you’ll be hard pressed to find a man as passionate, informed and inspiring as the OG boss don Patrick Johnson. Don’t believe me? Search the P Johnson tag on Tumblr and weep upon the sheer infinite number of notes the name elicits compared to other feeble pretenders.

Patrick’s store embodies the best qualities of the Australian tailoring model: its beginner friendly, flexible, offers a staggering amount of customisation and is genuinely a neat space to set foot in. From the myriad of detail related minutiae that pepper all of his styling, to the many richly coloured Drakes ties that line the store’s walls this is sprezzy menswear in its purest single malt form. Patrick and co work from a number of base models to build your dream suit and despite the glorious luxury of the whole affair he remains one of Australia’s most affordable tailors. P. Johnson nabs the top spot on our list because it is an experience unique to Australia, available only to those who travel to our sandy shark infested shores. Besides, when your product is the subject of praise by Tumblr heavyweights like Ethan Newton and Alessandro Restivo, the rest of us peasants are all but legally obligated to fall in line.  Quit copping those cosy boy/drug dealer type pants, because if you ever want to purchase a made to measure rig it should be from this joint.

STYLETERNITY  

In case you missed it, I blew a full clip on the go-hard types on Lookbook (all in good fun of course), now waiting for the hate mail to punch through my screen

In the mean time, click through and have a good old chuckle on the Pinz

STYLETERNITY